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Discussion Starter #1
Found the power line that goes to the relay that I think has the diode in it.
I used the diode test function on the meter, and it came back dead one way, 1616 or 1615 the other way. I suppose this means the diode is working.

tell me... what does 1616 mean??:mad:

I am getting 10 volts instead of the full battery power to the RR, and it is the same amount at the alternator. I don't know if this is right or not.
 

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Found the power line that goes to the relay that I think has the diode in it.
Relay? Or rectifier?
I used the diode test function on the meter, and it came back dead one way, 1616 or 1615 the other way. I suppose this means the diode is working.

tell me... what does 1616 mean??:mad:
By dead, do you mean open circuit, as though you weren't touching it with the probes? If yes, that, combined with the 1616 reading indicates a working rectifiier. What 1616 means depends on your meter; on mine, it means there are two diodes in series, or a resistance in series with a diode. Do you have a link to your schematic, so I may give a better answer?
I am getting 10 volts instead of the full battery power to the RR, and it is the same amount at the alternator. I don't know if this is right or not.
Not sure where this measurement is taken. Is the key on, engine off? A schematic would help a lot here, too.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
diodes, are like gateways that are open only one way, and closed the other.
they keep current in a line while a device uses it, rahter than draining it to ground. It is used in low power situations where the power must be constant for the device to deliver a proper reading, like an electronic tach.
They are also used in rectifier circuits to keep the power flowing in one direction only.
 

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Son, I've worked with diodes since 1967, so I know fully well how they work, and how various meters give different readings of them. Also, there are more kinds of diodes, used for different functions, than you mentioned.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
K sorry.
The wiring paper I got for it, does not have 2 relays on it, my bike has 2 relays. the first one I think is suposed to power on the instrument panel, and the other I think is supposed to power on the starting relay from the kill switch.
I think they are supposed to be different. I took the old ones apart to see if there is a difference, and one switches the diode in a different direction. because there is no diagram to look at, I can't tell which goes where.
there is a 3h5 omcron and 4h7 omcron 1981 XS1100 yamaha. anybody know?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
two diodes...

If there is an inline diode, and a diode in the relay that would account for the 1616 reading huh...

So why does the field need a resistance of 3.5 in it? and why does a stator need a resistance of .4 in it?
 

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The field is a coil of fine wire, consisting of many turns; the total length of the wire creates the resistance. Same is true for the stator, but it is wound with a thicker wire, with lower resistance per foot. If your meter is accurate at low resistance, a lower than expected resistance indicates the insulation on the wires is damaged, causing shorts and effectively reducing the length of the wire.

Very few meters can accurately read less than 1 Ohm, and many inexpensive ones have issues with less than 10 Ohms. The meter I use was $140 new, and was made by Fluke.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
What would melt my inline diode?

Like I needed to know that the field coil was exciting the stator, and it does when I apply 12v, but it melted my inline diode. I know jack about inline diodes.
 
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