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Discussion Starter #1
Yesterday I went on a short ride and when I got back left the key in the ignition turned on, sure enough eight hours later when I went out to put it away the battery was dead. Do I need to hook it up to a 10 amp car type charger or will hooking it up to a battery tender for a while bring it back to life? Will it be done for or will it hold a charge if it does come back enough to be able to start it if I stop somewhere after riding for awhile? This is in a KTM 990SMT with a Scorpion battery.
 

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If I recall, the Scorpion is an AGM type, which might recover, but you very possibly shortened its life. The 10 Amp charger could finish it off, though. Charge current should be about 1/10 the Amp-hour rating, so a 12Ah battery should be charged at about 1.2A, but not much more. A 1.5A battery tender should handle it, but give it overnight, at least, before using the battery. A smaller tender could bring it back to life, but may not reach a true full charge, but the bike should take care of that, if you stay above idle long enough. After the tender says it is done, have it load tested; that test will let you know if the battery is good for now.
 

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Yeah!!! What HE just said!!^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Spot On!!!

Oh... and PS: Scorpion Brand is not all that great (IMHO)... They rank 1 step above Walmarts brand. Yuasa is a GREAT brand, but if money is tight, try BikeMaster AGM... We warantee them for 1 year... :)
 

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And get out of the habit of using the emergency kill switch to turn off the bike. If you use the key to turn off the bike then you won't forget to turn it off.
 

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This is just one of those things that we all learn as we get used to bikes. You learn from your experiences and develop your "Way" of start up and shutting down your bike. Find what works for you, after of course you get it running again.
 

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easy mistake to make.
don't fry your battery. re-charge slowly, like the other guys said.

the advice to SPEND the extra cash and get a Yuasa is VERY good advice. the battery is critical. it's worth having a good one.

this particular problem hasn't happened to me, because I always hit the KILL switch when I shut down the bike. that's an old habit that I picked up from an MSF instructor. so like they said - definitely learn to ALWAYS flip that switch off when you shut down the bike, or have any kind of trouble.

good luck. this too shall pass.

dT
 

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Don't feel bad. Did the same thing last year. I refuse to use that kill switch anymore. I one upped you though, I did it to two bikes in one day........
 

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easy mistake to make.



this particular problem hasn't happened to me, because I always hit the KILL switch when I shut down the bike. that's an old habit that I picked up from an MSF instructor.
dT
Just hitting the emergency kill switch still leaves the lights on if you forget to turn the key off. Hence, what killed the battery...
 

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That damn kill switch causes more trouble than its worth. The location of mine is such that I hit it while riding if wearing heavy gloves. I always do it in heavy stop and go traffic and the first couple times I did it freaked me out with, oh crap now whats happened. At least I'm used to doing it and just turn it back on, but its still annoying.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks everyone, I had turned off the kill switch and left the key on being in a hurry I guess. Normally I turn off the kill switch then take the key out of the ignition, guess dumb is what keeps the world as well as wheels spinning.
 

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And get out of the habit of using the emergency kill switch to turn off the bike. If you use the key to turn off the bike then you won't forget to turn it off.
They actually teach you to use the emergency switch in the required MC course here to get you in the habit of using it turn off your bike so it's your natural reaction in case of emergency. It's so prominent that in your driving test, apparently you can lose points by not shutting the bike off using the switch.

Dan
 

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They actually teach you to use the emergency switch in the required MC course here to get you in the habit of using it turn off your bike so it's your natural reaction in case of emergency. It's so prominent that in your driving test, apparently you can lose points by not shutting the bike off using the switch.

Dan
Its not that it is a good idea to use the emergency kill switch as your normal shutoff, it is because, like you said, they want you to know exactly where it is.

When I took the test, no class available back then, you had to look at the trooper and hit whatever switch he commanded, this was pass/fail, fail on one and you have to come back in a week. It wasn't a big deal for anybody because back then everybody getting a license had been riding for yrs and for some reason or another decided to get legal, or got tired of renewing the permit every 3 months.

And most people back then were like me, started young in the dirt, and you use the emergency kill switch alot in the dirt......that is if you're having lots of fun.

Nowadays most street bikes will be shutoff before you can get to the emergency kill switch..........I don't know of any reason I would want the bike off other than it is down.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
So the battery tender did the trick in a couple days, when I went out to go for a ride today(the 8th) the battery was charged fully, at least the light on the tender was green. Will a regular voltage tester do a load test or do I need a special piece of test equipment to see if I have killed my battery? I usually don't go for long rides, just a few miles to go to the store and back for errands, sometimes ninety miles or so.
 

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I'd recommend taking it to a shop that has equipment for testing it. They'll do a load test to see how healthy it still is. If it wasn't too old then it'll probably work fine for a while, you only shortened it's life(not killed it)
 

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So the battery tender did the trick in a couple days, when I went out to go for a ride today(the 8th) the battery was charged fully, at least the light on the tender was green. Will a regular voltage tester do a load test or do I need a special piece of test equipment to see if I have killed my battery? I usually don't go for long rides, just a few miles to go to the store and back for errands, sometimes ninety miles or so.
A regular voltage meter won't do a load test. If you don't have an actual load tester, then your best bet is to take it to a shop, as Stainless Steel mentioned, and have them load test it for you.

But with your regular voltage meter you can also do a "Poor man's load test," that will give you a decent idea of whether your battery is kaput or not.
 

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They actually teach you to use the emergency switch in the required MC course here to get you in the habit of using it turn off your bike so it's your natural reaction in case of emergency. It's so prominent that in your driving test, apparently you can lose points by not shutting the bike off using the switch.

Dan
You are correct that "they" require you to use it. Reason is cuz in the event your bike goes down on the side where the key switch is, you won't be able to shut the motor down using the key switch. Hence the run switch mounted on the handlebar.

Truth be told, a carbed bike will usually die maybe 10 seconds after hitting the ground, due to improper carb float height. The fuel will spill out the carb vents and rob the motor. On newer FI bikes, they have this nifty device named a Bank Angle Sensor (BAS) that shuts down the ignition and fuel pump systems when it detects the bike has fallen, thereby making the run switch kinda not needed... Yet they still make them.

I bypassed the run switch on all my bikes so that I'll never need to worry about it causing me grief. I also bypassed the clutch interlock switch and kick stand switch. Those items are added garbage that a seasoned rider doesn't need, and they usually just serve to cause trouble down the road.

I do understand why the BRC/MSF teach people to use tha run switch... But in this day and age, it's not needed.
 

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A regular voltage meter won't do a load test. If you don't have an actual load tester, then your best bet is to take it to a shop, as Stainless Steel mentioned, and have them load test it for you.

But with your regular voltage meter you can also do a "Poor man's load test," that will give you a decent idea of whether your battery is kaput or not.

I'm gonna go out on a limb here and see if I know what Eye means by a "Poor man's load test"...

1) Check your baseline battery voltage with the key off.
2) Turn the ignition key on, then check the voltage...
3) You may need an assistant to do this... Check the voltage across the battery whilst trying to start the bike. If the voltage drops below 10 volts while cranking, your battery is probaby toast...

Am I right Eye?
 
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