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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Seven riders were killed in New Hampshire. Now 4 more riders were killed in California.

Mike721 linked to a book detailing the death of more riders killed on a public highway. In the link the author says motorcycle dealerships will not talk about you possibly being killed on a motorcycle. Well they're selling motorcycles, it's probably a subject a dealer would best avoid. Dealers won't talk about it and I question myself as to how proper such a thread would be on any motorcycle forum.

But riders will talk among themselves with people they are comfortable with, about the death of a friend or family member while riding a motorcycle. They will remember the good, and maybe the not so good, about someone but their death is not forgotten.

I don't intend to be ghoulish or anything like that, but if you have lost someone, maybe hearing about that person, and the circumstances which cost them so dearly, may help someone else avoid those circumstances which hurt so many others. I like to think that all riders feel something when they hear of tragedy striking another rider.

I lost a brother-in-law about 10 years ago. He was riding a 650 Yamaha VStar. He ran off the road into a bunch of trees and wasn't found until the next morning. He had been acting "kind of goofy", best guess is he had taken too much of a prescription prescribed to him. His second oldest son got the leather jacket his dad was wearing that night. He gave it to me, to keep for him until he asks for it back. From time to time, I remind him I still have it.

Archie was a clown that loved his three boys and his wife. If you needed a hand, all you had to do was ask. (Damn! I'm about to cry :crying:).

Management can decide if this is a proper thread or not.
 

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I didn't know the people involved, it happened before I moved to the area but there is a roadside shrine to 2 fallen bikers on rt512 headed into Bangor, PA, the town I just moved out of. It's a beautiful tribute, it's well built with club colors etc and kept tended and maintained by their club brothers.

The story was terrifyingly similar to the tragedy of the 7, a pickup truck with an impaired driver crossed the center line into the path of this mc club that was going the other way, headed to a funeral of all things, took them all out, 6 were injured and 2 died.

For 3 years I rode past that shrine every morning and night, it always gave me the willies seeing it. One day the club was there working on it, they all looked up at the sound of my engine, I didn't know what to do so I gave the biker wave, they all returned it while standing there practically at attention.

https://www.lehighvalleylive.com/slate-belt/2011/07/bangor_police_identify_driver.html
 

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As an ex motorcycle salesman, I can assure you I would talk about the down side of riding bikes. Plus how we could help prevent them. A typical question from a parent would be. " Will my baby fall off this bike " My answer. Absolutely yes. But if you follow my advice, he or she will do it in the dirt, away from trees. Practicing in the dirt will better prepare them for when they hit the road.

OR. They do not get the dirt bike now, they get a street bike later, when you have no further input, and they hit the highways, to do battle with the semis, with no experience. Which do you think is the smarter move?

Sold one XR75. or XL100 175 or 250. Further. It is possible your baby may not like riding, and gives it up of their own accord.

I have a friend who has a unique resume. Twice he has had bikes pass him at high speed, and die within the next 30 seconds.

Back in the day, we used to keep tabs on how soon a bike purchaser would crash. One guy hit a car on the opposite side of the road, to the exit of the bike shop. One guy died within 1 1/2 miles of the dealer, on his just purchased CB750. One guy killed a cage driver by T boning the cage at high speed.

UK
 

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Thanks for cheering me up:surprise:

Sam:nerd:
 

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Thanks for cheering me up:surprise:

Sam:nerd:
Tough and ugly subject. But it does impact all of us. Most guys that sold bikes in the city areas, would have one or two crashed bikes show up, when they opened shop on Monday or Tuesday. One weekend we had about 15. I got on the phone, and it was the same story at other bike shops, all the way to Portland OR, which is as far as I checked.

UK
 

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Our instructor related a few stories during our time with him but I definitely think it should be an official part of the course. Those stories can seem harsh but reality is harsher when you hit the pavement or another car.
 

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It's a tough and often ugly subject but I'm perfectly content knowing when it's my time it makes no difference if I'm in a car or on a bike. My job will always be to do the best I can in any given situation. Crashes happen. Avoid as best you can. Wear the best gear you can afford to minimize any pain if you do crash. If you can't talk about crashing or keep it in the back of your mind while riding, then maybe a motorcycle really isn't for you. A cage might be safer for you. Nothing wrong admitting you don't have the mindset needed to ride. But I prefer to be riding when I get the final call and will always try to avoid crashing. As I'm certain everyone else tries as well. All you can ever possibly do is the best you can. You cannot control the other drivers but you can try to avoid them.
 

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I believe there is a fallen Rider thread here somewhere.
 

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When I first became an MSF Instructor, I often worked with a great guy who was also a great Instructor. He had been riding for much longer than I had, and frankly, was a much more skilled rider than I was. His "real" job was as a long haul truck driver, but when he took a vacation he would hit the road with his HD full dress tourer, thinking nothing about traveling from the Midwest up to Alaska to visit one of his grown children. One night I was called that he had been killed on his bike, right in town, with no other vehicles involved. It was raining and he was heading home from somewhere and apparently went through what looked like a big puddle but in fact was a huge pothole filled with water. He was thrown from the bike and despite leather and helmet was killed instantly. The only consolation was that he was doing what he loved best when he was killed. He used to tell students that riding was dangerous and always would be. That with good training and care you could manage the risk of riding and learn to enjoy the experience, but that risk could never be eliminated.

Following my friend's death I would tell the students that I taught in the basic riding course the same things that he did. Sometimes a student would openly say that they were not willing to take that risk, and would not be riding a motorcycle. I even had one student tell me that he thought I would motivate him to ride, and not dissuade him by talking about the risk, and he left the class and did not return. If anything, the risks today are far worse than when I was teaching over 20 years ago. Now we have the distraction of cell phones, the inattention of drivers that are relying upon their car's technology to keep them safe, and a lot more vehicles on the roads. But I still ride because what I get from riding more than compensates the risk I know I am taking. Just yesterday, after a morning of strenuous yard work, and waiting around for a contractor doing work at my home, I felt I had time for at least a short ride. I left the Goldwing in the garage and took my 149cc scooter out for an hour. Hitting 60 mph on a country road on this little scooter is a real hoot, and after my one hour ride, covering about 45 miles, I was more refreshed than if I had laid down for a mid day nap and certainly feeling more alive than I would have by doing anything other than riding. I hope I am never one of those that others talk about, saying "he seemed a really skilled rider but got killed on his bike" or anything like that, but I will keep on riding as long as I possibly can.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
IMO every new rider should have someone like Vito tell them you can die doing this. There is a lot more traffic these days and more distractions than ever before. If someone wants to ride, they should know what the risks and consequences are right from the beginning. If they decide it's not for them, they have made an informed decision they deem best for them. Nothing wrong with that.
 
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