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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Several bikes I have been looking at have DCT (automatic) transmissions. I don't miss shifting gears in a car, and wonder how much I should consider a bike with DCT. A friend of mine recently took a "ride like a pro" course; we talked about it at length over holidays. A large part of that is slow speed maneuvering. I remember in MSF course (for license) a lot of learning the friction zone and sometimes applying light pressure on rear brake to safely go slow. And some bikes now have interlocked front/rear brakes. So I am wondering from those that now have the DCT and inter-locked brakes: How has it changed/effected your parking lot/ low speed driving? More duck-walking? What are the work-arounds? Or is this no big deal? Thanks!
 

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I remember once teaching a basic course to 15 young Marines. Only one had ever driven or ridden anything that wasn't an automatic shift. So I had to teach them first what gears were and the purpose of a clutch. Then came learning the coordination of the two plus adding use of the throttle. Point is, if you learn and become proficient in the use of all the components of motors, gears and shifting, then whatever bike you choose will be acceptable if it meets other criteria you have set. You limit yourself with everything being automatic.

Now what I have said above is with the idea that a large part of bike riding is the fun of open space in the summer, of the power and noise of a motor, the challenge of deciding how you will shift and gear and brake. Take any of those features away and you are gentrifying the whole package. Actually, that's pretty much what happens when you travel in a luxury car. It's easy, but is it as much fun? (Winter time in the cold and snow will change that opinion though. True.)

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By the way, I should add that when I ride a bike with linked brakes in slow turns, I treat it as if it were a non-linked bike just to keep more control. With ABS there is more rear brake with the foot brake applied than only with the hand lever. Any other features are not of matter at those low speeds.

One advantage to separate brakes can be if you have a tire blowout where you will want to slow with just the rear, it's much easier if your brakes are not linked. Also, on some slopes you may want to use only one brake or the other.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
RonK I agree with all that you said. But I am wondering if any members here have switched to a DCT and find themselves walking from the far end of the parking lot instead of working the friction zone through the traffic.

Last year my son was going to apply for a job that had requirement (among many other things) of being able to drive manual transmission. I suggested to my wife that my he take basic rider course at the community college just to get (FROM SOMEONE ELSE!) his first intro to clutches and shifting. neither son or wife thought much of the idea.

So has anyone gone to DCT and regretted it at least When taking the Big cruiser/tourer through tight areas?
 

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RonK I agree with all that you said. But I am wondering if any members here have switched to a DCT and find themselves walking from the far end of the parking lot instead of working the friction zone through the traffic.

Last year my son was going to apply for a job that had requirement (among many other things) of being able to drive manual transmission. I suggested to my wife that my he take basic rider course at the community college just to get (FROM SOMEONE ELSE!) his first intro to clutches and shifting. neither son or wife thought much of the idea.

So has anyone gone to DCT and regretted it at least When taking the Big cruiser/tourer through tight areas?
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I once had a company with stick shift delivery vehicles, so it can behoove one to know the procedures on occasion. To answer that question to others with DCT, I would go to GL1800Riders and ask some Gold Wing riders.

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Aren't most DCT systems done where at low speeds they revert and are no longer linked, so you are back to basics? I thought I read that's how they function or it may have been one specific brand that functioned that way. I just seem to recall I had concerns with gravel roads and someone stated the brakes are unlinked under a certain speed.
 
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