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I know this is probably out there, but I've got this idea that I'm splashing around in this medicated mind of mine, and I just want to throw it out there and see what happens.

I am a smith. I use that term as a catch all, because I am a woodsmith, blacksmith, and work with just about any medium out there.

I am a daily rider, and am planning some big trips, as I have found myself with time, and a strong desire to go on a few driveabouts. Some places in the country I want to see.

There's the background, now the idea...

I have a 2007 Yamaha V-Star 1100 Silverado Classic.
Of course this came with the standard Black leather saddlebags.
It has the rear seat setup with a sissy bar (padded).
I'll get pics up better than the one I have.

My idea is to utilize the existing saddlebag racks, remove the rear seat setup, and design an Aerodynamic 'box' that I can slip on and bolt down for a long ride. So on a long ride, I have much better storage ability, and a little more stability than just a backpack died down.

Has anyone done anything like this before? I'm open to suggestions, tips, tricks, ideas, semi-crude jokes about my ancestry...

I open myself to your questions and comments!!
 

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the only problem I can see from that is if you make the "pack" big enough to hold a good amount of gear....you are just adding to the weight on the top side of the bike....10 pounds in a saddle bag will affect the bike a lot different than 10 pounds up higher....

I have saddle bags on my bike also, if I was going to make a cross country ride, I would spend the money for a hitch and get a small trailer to pull behind me....of course since I'm disabled, I'm not going on any long trips and my saddle bags work just fine for me on my runs to the grocery store lol
 

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Discussion Starter #3
....you are just adding to the weight on the top side of the bike....10 pounds in a saddle bag will affect the bike a lot different than 10 pounds up higher....
This is truth.
My goal though is not necessarily to wind up with a 'higher' pack, but one that is a touch deeper and a touch wider than what I'm seeing available.
I'd want to keep my gear as low as possible.
The section that would go across the rear fender would be no higher than what the back seat rest would be now, and what I was considering was just more like a 'glove box' wrap over, to keep some lighter items handy for the trip.
A place to toss my wallet, folding map, small camera, etc.. stuff I'd want to get to quickly without having to unpack. (also locking for pistol storage ;)

I really need to draw it out maybe... add the pics here?
 

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ahhh I see what you're saying now....just kind of attach the bags together over the seat (rather than under it in the case of throw over bags) with a small space to hold things...nothing too high, but high enough to hold some stuff....I get it now...I know I've wished a few time my bags were just a bit wider when I leave the grocery store, but I also carry a net in my bags for things that won't fit
 

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Discussion Starter #5
ahhh I see what you're saying now....just kind of attach the bags together over the seat (rather than under it in the case of throw over bags) with a small space to hold things...nothing too high, but high enough to hold some stuff....I get it now...I know I've wished a few time my bags were just a bit wider when I leave the grocery store, but I also carry a net in my bags for things that won't fit
hah, I carry one of those 'fold into itself' duffel bags, the ones that fold up small... and some bungee cords :)
 

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How are you with working with aluminum? From sheeting you could fashion a set that looks like an inverted U. The side boxes could be wider, longer or lower than your current set up. You could make 1 or 3 doors on top. Or you could simply buy some military surplus ammo cans and have it come out like this.

Since I'm new and can not post images or links you'll just have to google ammo can saddle bags.
 

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I've seen you fit 2 liter bottles in your coat pockets.
well yeah...but that was when I was on my old bike and didn't have saddle bags....and it was 2 bottles in each side....but that's also my winter coat, kinda warm to wear in the summer :p

and I can fit two 2 liter bottles in each saddle bag, but that don't leave much room for anything else....as it is (since I quit drinking so much soda pop) I can usually get 2 grocery bags in each side as long as what's in the sack isn't too big....for the bigger stuff, I put it on the rear rack and use my stretchy net to hold it down
 

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deep thoughts on this....

I have thought alot on this customizing carrying devices on a two wheeler..

I came to the conclusion that the only good alternative to more storage for a long ride is a trailer.

The worst part about building a custom rearward trunk, is that you have to completely redesign the tailsection, lighting and everything...

A simple solution is an expandable bag, with sections that can be pinned down when they are empty, but you will need to carry long pins, for when its full, and short pins when its empty.

You could fold it like an accordian, and pin it on both ends.

I like hard cases. even the thin plastic stock ones kind of perturb me..
 

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Bag

On all my bikes I have two saddle bags. On all of them I can have a rear removable box. But what holds the most stuff, is a waterproof bag, that goes across the rear of the seat, to almost the outer ends of the saddle bags. It is easy to tie in place.
Large decent bags are available at your sailing marine supply store.
I can measure mine of you like. I also use a good sized tank bag.

Unkle Crusty*
 

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^^^:71baldboy:


I have graduated from a duffle to a sort of back-pack device. (It was a gift.) But a water proof duffle would likely be the easiest solution. Plus, unlike a built up trunk it's easier to unload the duffle when you stop for the night. Just unhook the bungees and off you go.

I don't carry enough $hit with me on a trip to ever need a trailer.
 

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I have a two piece backpack as well. Bungie it to the back rest and off you go. Mine came with a rain cover since the bag isn't water proof, but a large garbage bag would work as well.
 

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I have customized Harley panhead hard saddlebags on my V-Star as back then it was all that was really available (they were installed in 2000). That said, it was more than enough room for rain gear and my lunch and stuff for work, but it was a pain to bring my crap to the garage every day, open the bags and carefully place the lid aside, fill it up, close and lock, repeat at work, repeat leaving work and repeat when I get home. I think it just became obvious that the saddle bags were great to store gear but not really for opening and closing 4 times a day. Soooo I bought this beauty:

http://www.saddlemen.com/ftb1500-sport-sissy-bar-bag-universal

Absolutely perfect... I keep it in the house and before work I just throw in my lunch, thermos and work papers and whatnot and get in the garage and just slide the backing over the sissybar and good to go. When I get to work, just take it off and and bring it with me. It fits like it was made for the sissybar on my vstar, it's the exact same height and it just sits supported on the backseat.

This is also a very good choice and comes with straps so you can wear it like a backpack:

http://www.saddlemen.com/ftb1000-sport-sissy-bar-bag-universal

Anyhow, good luck with your project!

Dan
 

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The OP dates back to November of last year.

Having said that, I would suggest getting some books on touring. They are full of suggestions on gear, gadgets, and strategies for what to pack, and how to eliminate those things you 'think' you will need on your long trip, but which you really won't need... It can be a reality check, of sorts.

There are tricks, such as sink-washable, synthetic undergarments: they are made of hi-tech materials, so they wick away moisture, while keeping you warm, and cool, at the same time; you only need two pairs: one to wear, while the other is drying after being washed in the sink at the end of the day. Sounds bad, but it saves tremendous room, while still keeping you clean and comfortable. These books should also cover helpful accessories you may want to install, as well as upgrades, which will improve the quality, and safety, of a long distance ride.

These books will cover pre-trip planning: what to take care of months before, then weeks before, then days before it's kickstand up. Sounds ridiculously simple, and obvious, but pre-planning is critical. It also de-stresses you before the day you leave, such that you feel confident you have it all under control, with no worries, when you lift the bike off the stand, and hit the starter button on your adventure.

Too many things to cover in a forum, for sure. There are several books available. Check your local library, first. Look into inter-library loans, if available, to get free books from regional libraries, if your local does not have what you are interested in reading. Three books I have found very useful are:
/ISBN-10: 1884313590; Fred Rau's,
/ISBN-10: 0760337411; and,
/ISBN-10: 0760320357. Cheers!
:coffee:
 
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