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Discussion Starter #1
I'm trying to get the pros and cons of the Cruise control gadgets. Depending on the feedback I receive, I would consider one for long distant rides. They just seem dangerous. In all fairness to the gadget, I have not done any research on these contraptions. I'd appreciate opinions on them, good or bad.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I believe most gadgets out there are safe to use. They release easily when needed.
That was my main concern. If you had to release it on a whim, how would it respond. We cant have it getting jamming or stucking.....That would not be good.
 

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There are all kinds from simple mechanical devices that hold the throttle in place to electronic speed controls.

I saw one that was pretty simple and cheap. It flipped over against the brake lever with a finger and held the throttle by friction. You only had to turn the throttle back to release it.
 

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I would be lost without mine. It a factory electronic device and has a known problem. If you blow the fuse to the brakes, it has no idea you are applying them so will stay engaged. Solution, turn the ignition off if you have time. I still use mine all the time. They do make electronic add on devices that are much better than the so called suicide throttle locks that work off of friction on the throttle it's self. I have a bad wrist and wouldn't be able to ride the miles I do without one.
 

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I have a universal VistaCruiz on my Vmax. With my carpel tunnel in my right hand, at times, it is nice to give the hand a break. It locks the throttle in place nicely, and with a flip of the thumb, it releases.

I only use mine for a few moments, just long enough to flex my hand a bit to get rid of any numbness.
 

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All Harleys (that do not come with factory electronic cruise) have a set screw to hold the throttle in position. It works well, but you have to turn it back to get it to release.
 

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When using a throttle lock, make certain that you can still turn the throttle when it is engaged!... They are supposed to be just tight enough to hold the throttle in place, but still loose enought to close the throttle without dis-engaging it, if necessary.

Got passed by a semi, doing 60. He did not see us (riding two up), and he forced me to ride onto the shoulder, while closing the throttle, of course! I forgot I had the throttle lock engaged, until I went to accellerate back into the traffic lane, from the shoulder -- I had a hard time opening the throttle until I released the lock.

Throttle locks are good for short-term relief only. They do not adjust the throttle for inclines, so your speed will drift, even on a "level" roadway. Electronic cruise controls are much better at maintaining speeds, but only on relatively straight roadways: as you lean into a curve, the lean will reduce the bike's speed, and the cruise control will accellerate, automatically, at the worst possible time, to keep speed the same. Electronic cruise controls which are made for bikes (only know of one as an aftermarket, DIY type), have multiple switches to disengage the units: borth brake levers; the clutch; the throttle (close it completely, and it should disengage the cruise); as well as a Set/Coast button.

Installing/adapting a car cruise control to a motorcycle is full of issues which could kill you, your passenger, and innocent bystanders. Go pro, or go home and drive your car/truck. Cheers!
:coffee:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Got passed by a semi, doing 60. He did not see us (riding two up), and he forced me to ride onto the shoulder, while closing the throttle, of course! I forgot I had the throttle lock engaged, until I went to accellerate back into the traffic lane, from the shoulder -- I had a hard time opening the throttle until I released the lock.
Installing/adapting a car cruise control to a motorcycle is full of issues which could kill you, your passenger, and innocent bystanders. Go pro, or go home and drive your car/truck. Cheers!
:coffee:[/QUOTE]

That is the exact reason I'm inquiring. In a spare of the moment situation, It's hard enough to concentrate on staying upright and not getting hit. Having an extra worry(cruise control gadget) to worry about may not be worth it.

I think I will stick with going pro.....Thanks all for the feedback.
 

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For safety, any cruise control shouldn't be used in situations where precise control over the throttle is called for. That's common sense.
 

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I would be lost without mine. It a factory electronic device and has a known problem. If you blow the fuse to the brakes, it has no idea you are applying them so will stay engaged. Solution, turn the ignition off if you have time. I still use mine all the time. They do make electronic add on devices that are much better than the so called suicide throttle locks that work off of friction on the throttle it's self. I have a bad wrist and wouldn't be able to ride the miles I do without one.
We could fix that with a $12 relay and a little wiring Hog. You want me to draw you a circuit? I'll have to have you take a couple of measurements so I know if the brake switches switch 12V or apply ground to the brake circuit your cruise control is tapped into.
 

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Installing/adapting a car cruise control to a motorcycle is full of issues which could kill you, your passenger, and innocent bystanders.
Issues like what Sarge? Waterproofing? A cruise control "box" has no knowledge of whether it's being installed on a big motorcycle or a small car. The electrical/mechanical inputs and outputs are the same.

PROPER installation, including wiring up of both brake AND clutch levers is what's important. Not leaving wires where they can chafe. Having a "clean" pull line from the actuator to the throttle lever that can't bind or get hung on something. Ensuring the actuator isn't going to rattle loose to where it could.
 

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We could fix that with a $12 relay and a little wiring Hog. You want me to draw you a circuit? I'll have to have you take a couple of measurements so I know if the brake switches switch 12V or apply ground to the brake circuit your cruise control is tapped into.
Thanks for the offer Wade but me and electronics don't mix. I can screw up anything I touch on a bike. Household power I'm a little better at but DC and me do not mix for some reason. I even question myself just replacing a fuse. I know darn good and well something caused it to blow. Nope, if it can go spark spark, I chicken out. I feel you have to know your limitations and DC circuitry is one of mine. Thanks though. I figured there was a way to fix it but I bet Harley already has a service bulletin to fix it. I just haven't asked about it to find out.
 

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I read this review, on WebBikeWorld.com, years ago., wihch describes some of the pitfalls of adapting an automotive cruise control to a motorcycle. Read it for yourself, if you like. It was published back in 2007, so it may be out of date.

After all is said, and done, I have logged around around 20,000 miles between a mechanical throttle lock on my first bike, and an OEM electronic cruise control on my current touring bike (99% two-up riding). I really appreciated the throttle lock, in spite of its warts and shortcoming's. I very much prefer the electronic cruise control, and I won't ride a touring bike without one, again! It's a matter of personal choice, of course. I find the electronic cruise control wonderful to use, but you have to use it intelligently and carefully. It is no different than any other piece of your safety gear, or function of your bike, overall. Electronic cruise controls//mechanical throttle locks do make a wonderful difference on long rides. I am a convert, of course, but each to their own. Cheers!
:coffee:
 

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I've had several throttle locks over the years and found them all useful, mostly for just giving my right hand a short break on a straight stretch of road. Mostly I've used the VistaCruise but it has the tendency to get loose from vibration. On my current bike I have a Kaoka throttle lock, which replaces the bar end on the handlebar. Its a bit more awkward to engage and disengage than the VistaCruise but does not seem to ever loosen. It also lets me "lock" the throttle but still adjust it slightly up or down as needed. But while a VistaCruise costs about $35, the Kaoka was $135. If I could have fit a VistaCruise on my current bike I would actually prefer it to the more expensive Kaoka.

One nice thing about a throttle lock is that it allows you to take both hands off the grips at the same time and wave to oncoming riders with both hands! That always catches their attention!

Whenever I think about what I wish Triumph would have added or made an available option on the Thunderbird, a real cruise control device is at the top of the list. Long stretches on the Interstate would really be much more comfortable if I could just set the speed and then relax.
 

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I have a vista cruise... its nice for giving your wrist a rest, and even when it is engaged, its designed to be able to move with very slight pressure. even on the highway with your hand on the throttle, it prevents you from having to give the throttle a death grip to hold the desired speed
 

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Throttle locks are great if they are adjusted properly. My Goldwing has factory cruise control and I love it, touch either brake and it disengages.
 
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