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"Mustang, Chevelle SS, Camaro RS, RoadRunner, all were mine,"

Color me green .

I'm more an 'A' Body MoPar lover, one of my dream cars is a first year Barracuda with the "leaning Tower Of Power"
slant 6 with the factory 2BBL carby, 727 slushbox tranny and factory disc brakes, torsion bars from an 'A' body station wagon, AC and like that ~ not a racing car by any means but those old MoPars out handled most things GM or Ford and you can build one using factory parts that'll go like the wind if not spin the tires, I don't care about burn outs ~ I like rapid Motorvation no matter where i go .
 
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@
Jmacd62 ;

Did she like the Hornet ? .

We had them in out fleet for years, sturdy but not much fun to drive ~ heavy steering etc. .
 

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I guess if the kid wants to tour the country on a crotch rocket the answer is "nothing". I have to assume however that doing a 1500-2500 mile ride on my Ultra would spoil him (even if he'd NEVER admit it)
 

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Good discussion. Lots of helpful comments on a potentially divisive thread. The conversation is useless to just defend what we like for our own benefit, but experience is helpful for riders that are trying to determine what they will like.

I think a lot about what makes me happy with my bikes so I can better know what to invest in. I've seen that change a lot over the years. Instead of thinking to myself I'll share my thoughts to see if it helps anybody, but I apologize for the long post. Maybe it'll help somebody make a decision.

I've loved every bike I've owned / ridden except a Suzuki Tempter 650 which was underpowered for me. I had a VTX1300 which is a cruiser much like a Harley. I loved the torque and wasn't lacking in what I wanted for acceleration. My wife and I took our first long overnight trip and realized we wanted something more comfortable for longer distance. She bought me a used FJR1300 so we could do longer rides. This became our thing and I eventually upgraded to a Goldwing. I also rode a Harley 4000 miles up and down California and had a blast, but I like my Goldwing a little better. That's mostly preference, though. Once I got used to the forward pegs, I forgot I was on a different bike most of the trip, which included lots of twisties.

I now spend most of my riding on my MT-10 which has the R1 engine detuned just a bit in an upright bike. Tammy got on the MT-10 with me for 3 miles and that was 3 miles longer than she wanted. But I love it! It's not as much fun as our cross country trips on the Goldwing, but we just can't squeeze those into busy schedules very often. It's much easier to take a weekend and go to the mountains or a track by myself but it's probably also tempting fate with 57 year-old bones, I have to admit.

So... that is my experience which leads to these opinions:

Pros of an R1 vs a Harley Street Glide
- Faster acceleration - Most Harley's have good power up to 80 and then get you over 100 without leaving you wanting. But even my MT-10 will set you back in your seat when you twist the throttle at 130 mph. Don't ask me how I know.:rolleyes: R1 = 0-60 in 2.64 seconds and 0-100 in 5.12
- Top speed - R1 = 182
- Better handling - You can throw a true sport bike into the corners much easier than you can a cruiser. This is a factor but NOT as much as you would think. You can learn to ride any bike well in the corners with body position and riding technique.
- Easier to trailer - It's lighter, but also no one will think negatively of you for towing it to good roads because nobody in their right mind will ride it long distance.
- Maybe less expensive - List of R1 is $17,400 and the Street Glide is $22,000 but there are lots of variety in price options of supersports and cruisers.
- Track capability
- Sport style - Nobody wants to be a poser, but style is a factor with our bikes. There's an image you have when you are on a crotch rocket. If you are into that style, it matters.

Pros of a Street Glide vs an R1
- Comfort - Ability to handle much more distance because of the riding position.
- Town riding - They call it a cruiser for a reason. I miss my VTX still for this reason. If you just want to enjoy the ride at speed limit and relax, a cruiser is the only way to go. I'm not able to enjoy the real benefits of my MT-10 at any legal speed limit, which is not a good thing. I'm very fortunate I live in a rural area and am at least somewhat disciplined in my riding. I can't imagine why anyone would buy an R1 that was going to go the speed limit all the time.
- Speed awards - You are less likely to be speeding on a cruiser than a sport bike. My opinion is that good gear and riding something with side bags make you less of a ticket magnet, but that is arguable.
- Two-up riding - You can get a passenger on the R1, but they won't be happy for long. Tammy said the Harley we rode was very comparable to our Goldwing which we call "the couch".
- Harley image - As the Sport style comment above, there is an image you buy into with a cruiser and especially with a Harley.

Tie - Engine life - I'm a Yamaha engine fan and think their quality is the best, but I admit Harley has fixed a lot of problems over the years. High revving engines aren't made to last a lot of miles, though. 30,000 miles is an awful lot on an R1, but probably still is a fair amount on a Harley. Who can sit on an R1 that many miles anyway? Now 100,000 on an FJR or a Goldwing is nothing, so the metric tourers win that battle easily in my opinion.
 

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No. Drag elbow or helmet.
Well then that's more about the rider than the bike. The guy in this video (Motojitsu, highly recommended) is just casually dragging a knee. A little more effort and I'm sure he could get his elbow down, especially if he swapped out the handlebar for clip ons like the sport bike has.

 

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Different bikes for different times in one’s life. At some point I found that I just didn’t enjoy being bent into a pretzel just to get my feet on the pegs. Over time I had to admit comfort was more important than performance. Most recently, with concern over tipping a heavy bike, I found the solution in 3 wheels. If I live long enough I might decide that the most fun is with the stability and comfort of four wheels. It’s just great that we have so many to choose from.
 

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@Goodman :

No worries about the post length, you had stuff to share, it takes a bit of text, that's good .

"Nobody wants to be a poser " I can't tell you how wrong you are there .

I think discussing the various attributes of different bikes, styles and riding is very good indeed .

I don't like seeing newbies put down no matter how foolish others may think they are .

In the 1970's I taught a lot of people how to ride, I wish two wheeled riding was part of the public education curriculum, same as basic firearms use and care : knowledge is power, no need to be afraid once you fully understand a thing .

Motocyclists are an interesting and diverse bunch, often they want to be individual and so dress like a movie biker bad guy, I don't think those grasp the irony .

I agree Harley-Davidson has made huge strides ahead, I still don't want one because I no longer like wrestling a heavy machine .
 

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I think it was Joni Mitchell who sang goes round and round and round like a circling bomb or something like that.
There is a problem with two much tippy on the public highways. You might have noticed that the tippy crowd are paying particular attention to the inside of the corner. Meanwhile an F350 pastes them from the other direction.
Too, at the track, it is slow. Might look good for the videos, wot we used to call doing a Hollywood. But that is all.

I recall dragging a knee on Yami once. Fortunately there was a guy near to help me pick him up.
Notice that the guys that go fast at the IOM and the Ulster, do not drag knees, or hang off the side of the bike. Their bodies are not inline with the bike. Style is only for style. Fast is a lot different. UK
 

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"Nobody wants to be a poser " I can't tell you how wrong you are there .
I get your point.

I probably would change that to "Nobody wants to be CALLED a poser". I led a book study many years ago where one of the author's key points was that we all have a poser inside us that acts contrary to our true self and purpose because we worry about what others think. Identifying and confronting where we "pose" lets us dig deeper into those areas where we are missing who we were created to be. Anyway, that's what I was thinking about when I made that statement.

I have no "style" and do the opposite of what is cool 80% of the time because I hate style and am an introvert. But I still get influenced by peer pressure from riding friends and even forum friends in things like riding gear and maybe what I ride. Sometimes that's a good thing, as I now am mostly ATGATT (I always say I'm Most All The Gear Most All The Time) when I was not before. We gravitate to a style even if we aren't trying to be posers.

I don't look down on a rider that buys gear like his friends even if it's odd. It can be posing, fitting in, or adapting. Only you can tell if you're posing.
 
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