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Has anyone out there tried to tour across the US. If so, any tips for doing it. Seems to be many next adventure and I’m trying to get all the tips possible.
 

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In 2011 I rode a 2006 Kawasaki Ninja 650 from Vancouver, Washington to Roanoke Virginia and back. Total was about 8,000 miles. The bike is not normally considered a touring bike, but with a taller aftermarket windscreen, heated grips, and Givi V35 hard cases I made it work while still having relatively light weight and good handling. I was 70 years old at the time and it was one of my "bucket list" items.

My advice is to stay off the freeways and look for curvy, interesting routes that may make the distance and time longer, but more fun and less tiring. Good rain gear is a must, and you should be prepared for a wide range of temps. I started out in mid September and it was hot, but I got home in mid October and the mornings on some days were near freezing. I would avoid mid summer months as extreme heat is tough day after day. Spring is more likely to bring rain and volatile weather.

The most difficult part of the ride was crossing eastern Colorado and Kansas. The wind was blowing like mad from my left front, and every passing cattle truck made a blast of wake that actually ripped my jacket zipper apart. I came back further south through Arkansas, Texas and New Mexico and it was a better route.

I started a blog for the ride. I can't post the link because I don't have enough posts yet, but if you look up "thegoodroads.blogspot.com", you should be able to find it. Go to the 2011 posts.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
In 2011 I rode a 2006 Kawasaki Ninja 650 from Vancouver, Washington to Roanoke Virginia and back. Total was about 8,000 miles. The bike is not normally considered a touring bike, but with a taller aftermarket windscreen, heated grips, and Givi V35 hard cases I made it work while still having relatively light weight and good handling. I was 70 years old at the time and it was one of my "bucket list" items.

My advice is to stay off the freeways and look for curvy, interesting routes that may make the distance and time longer, but more fun and less tiring. Good rain gear is a must, and you should be prepared for a wide range of temps. I started out in mid September and it was hot, but I got home in mid October and the mornings on some days were near freezing. I would avoid mid summer months as extreme heat is tough day after day. Spring is more likely to bring rain and volatile weather.

The most difficult part of the ride was crossing eastern Colorado and Kansas. The wind was blowing like mad from my left front, and every passing cattle truck made a blast of wake that actually ripped my jacket zipper apart. I came back further south through Arkansas, Texas and New Mexico and it was a better route.

I started a blog for the ride. I can't post the link because I don't have enough posts yet, but if you look up "thegoodroads.blogspot.com", you should be able to find it. Go to the 2011 posts.
Wow ! Much respect to you that sounds awesome. Thank you for the tips.
 

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I didn't do the whole cross country trip but twice in the last 2 years I rode from the East coast to Wyoming. We could have easily finished the trip to the west coast but decided to stay and play for a week in the Black Hills, I love it there.
Get used to wind crossing the plains, you will encounter it. One day was so windy my tires were literally worn on one side from 12 hours with a constant lean.

Gas stops are farther apart out west, plan ahead and make sure there is a town within your range.

Keep an eye on the weather, in the mountains especially it changes quickly, I rode through wind, rain, a dust storm, and a hail storm, all on the same day in Rapid City South Dakota area.

I like riding interstates so my advice is opposite of the previous posters, we usually ride the big distances on the highway and then find roads to play on and things to do at our planned stops, which might be just for the night or a whole day if there are things we want to visit.

I typically ride 400-800 miles a day when trying to cover ground, this makes for a decent length day and still time to eat a decent dinner and relax in the hot tub before it's time to sleep, and eat a nice breakfast in the morning before setting out. If I'm trying to really get somewhere I can do much longer days but it's hard to do 2 really long days in a row.
Dress appropriately for the weather and carry water, drink plenty, drink at every stop.

Watch for animals, especially after dark, in some areas they can be a lot of trouble. My own area is the worst in the country for deer strikes so I'm used to them, but still, be careful.

I don't like to camp on long bike trips, I love camping normally but after 800 miles in the heat or cold I like to have a soft, air conditioned bed waiting for me after I finish soaking in the hot tub.. OK I'm spoiled :)
 

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No.
But I have been to Southern CA in 57 Chev panel van, that wondered all over the highway, and ran the bearings on the way.

UK
 

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Some type of tire repair kit. If my bike had spokes, I'd just carry a new tube. That way you don't have to stop at every gas station along the interstate to air up a poor patch job. Experience is a great teacher, just not when it's doing it.
 
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