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So, I posted a while ago regarding an issue with a creaking chain. Thought it was an over tight chain, potential failed countershaft bearing etc. etc. all the usuals. I've countlessly check and re-aligned the chain, cleaned and lubed, checked for play in the bearing by removing the front sprocket and checking the countershaft for any wobbles. Taken it to two mechanics who can't find a thing wrong. It's a Hornet CB600f from 2000. Has done 48k. The bike rides beautifully, but when riding I can hear a low-level grating/whirring, and when I wheel the bike with the engine off there's a creaking from the chain and front sprocket area. It's been like this for about six months now and I've done around 4000 miles since then with no escalation in the problem. My question is, do bikes just develop sounds like this, due to age, or could there be an issue? The chain is a D.I.D gold x-ring with JTS sprockets. It's spotlessly cleaned and looking good, but I'm wondering if it could have stretched or there may be an internal problem with it regardless of looks. It's done 12k. Any advice, suggestions, help would be greatly appreciated.


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Based on chasing creaks on bicycles, I'd be looking for an undertightened sprocket for that sort of noise or a cracked frame. I've never heard a chain ITSELF creak.
 

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Chains and how to treat them.

ll chains must be oiled for them to function right. Some require days of soaking before they loosen up and run right.

I bought a garage sale item once that was full of buckets of grease, and each bucket had a motorcycle chain stuck down in it.

I would say that a soaking in 40 or 50w for a week might help a bit, or a full dunking and maybe some soaking in 90w grease for a while could stop a creaking.

I read in a mag someplace that there is a teflon bering in the drive box that is responsible for the sound. If you know that teflon bearings are basically a grind on grind bearing, it can ease your mind a bit. Teflon is slick because teflon slides on teflon, and sticks to everything because of static electricity. Some teflon grinds off and slides on the remainder of the bearing...causing a substantial reduction in friction...if you like those kind of theories!!!
Man---I like heavy metal bushings with grease and ball bearings!
 

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Creak.

With the back wheel off the ground, spin the rear wheel. You should here where any sound is coming from. You will see if the chain has any tight spots.
The chain may be too tight, and too dry of oil. Back it off all the way. Feel every link, to check if any are binding. If you do have links binding, lubrication may help. If not get a new chain. Remove the chain any spin the front sprocket. Spin the back wheel. You should here any noises. Check both sprockets for any hooks in the teeth. If you are not sure, compare against a new sprocket.

Unkle Krusty*
 

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The thing to do with unusual noises is to find two other owners of the same bike and ask to ride theirs around the block. Then you know if yours is making different or similar sounds.

In the auto world we can use something called chassis ears to find odd noises but it would be a lot harder on a bike.

I have walked, run, even bicycled NEXT to cars to try and identify the source of a sound. Driving next to a concrete retaining wall will reflect noises and sometimes helps. Perhaps you could put a driver on the front of your bike and sit on the back with a stethoscope to help locate your sound. Try and avoid sticking it in the spokes, eh?
 

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Or buy another bike (salvage) just like yours and start swapping parts till the noise goes away.

Your chain size and sprockets are correctly matched, right?
 
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