Motorcycle Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I am going to take the crank case cover of my 75 and clean the thick yellow fluid, I assume used to be oil, out of it. So what do I fill it with.

Thick Motor oil.

Bar Chain oil.

?
 

·
Nightfly
Joined
·
4,603 Posts
I wouldn't end the cleaning with just the cover. That yellow **** of which you speak is probably throughout your engine. Best check into that. I don't think the year matters.
 

·
Nightfly
Joined
·
4,603 Posts
Moisture in the oil usually causes a yellow sludge to accumulate. Could be a leaking head gasket if water cooled. You re-post part of my post, "I don't think the year matters," and then you bring up what "kind of bike" to make what point I don't know. The year doesn't matter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Moisture in the oil usually causes a yellow sludge to accumulate. Could be a leaking head gasket if water cooled. You re-post part of my post, "I don't think the year matters," and then you bring up what "kind of bike" to make what point I don't know. The year doesn't matter.

Well what I have is a 1975 Suzuki GT 185 air cooled street bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Moisture in the oil usually causes a yellow sludge to accumulate. Could be a leaking head gasket if water cooled. You re-post part of my post, "I don't think the year matters," and then you bring up what "kind of bike" to make what point I don't know. The year doesn't matter.

Well what I have is a 1975 Suzuki Gt185 air cooled street bike.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,772 Posts
The type matters more, and since it is air cooled, that changes the guesses about the source. It can't be a water leak, but it could be water of combustion, especially if the oil wasn't changed often enough, or it had a lot of short trips, especially in colder weather. The year could matter, as it could show how long the yellow stuff has had to collect. Some engine designs have areas that can trap this stuff, and even a normal oil change doesn't clean it out, because it tends to float on top, and find its way to surfaces that aren't in the normal oil flow. My CB450 is like that -too many short rides in cold weather made for a mess in the side cover areas, even after a few oil changes. I found it when I needed to work on the clutch.

So, to the OP, clean the stuff out, fill with recommended oil, and make sure it gets hot enough that the stuff doesn't collect again. If you don't know the recommended oil, many metric bikes used SAE 30, or 10W40; just stay away from the energy conserving kinds.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,892 Posts
Benanator Well what I have is a 1975 Suzuki Gt185 air cooled street bike.[/QUOTE said:
Is it a two stroke or a four stroke? Or did you want me to look it up? Not likely. So would you be kind enough to add this bit of information.
Also: When you say the crank case cover, please explain which cover. Left or right side? I would like to know the exact location of this cover, what shape it is, and where it usually fits on the engine.

Thank you so much. UK
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The type matters more, and since it is air cooled, that changes the guesses about the source. It can't be a water leak, but it could be water of combustion, especially if the oil wasn't changed often enough, or it had a lot of short trips, especially in colder weather. The year could matter, as it could show how long the yellow stuff has had to collect. Some engine designs have areas that can trap this stuff, and even a normal oil change doesn't clean it out, because it tends to float on top, and find its way to surfaces that aren't in the normal oil flow. My CB450 is like that -too many short rides in cold weather made for a mess in the side cover areas, even after a few oil changes. I found it when I needed to work on the clutch.

So, to the OP, clean the stuff out, fill with recommended oil, and make sure it gets hot enough that the stuff doesn't collect again. If you don't know the recommended oil, many metric bikes used SAE 30, or 10W40; just stay away from the energy conserving kinds.
Thank You for this info
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,772 Posts
Looked it up - the 1975 Suzuki Gt185 is a two-stroke twin, so my comment on which oil is invalid. The oil tank under the seat should be filled with 2-stroke oil. It also seems to have a crankcase to hold the transmission and clutch oil, which may call for plain motor oil. I might use oil for Diesel engines in there, because of the gears.

UK's question about which cover is relevant, as you could have opened the engine crankcase, or the transmission.

You might be able to find a manual free for download with a good search, perhaps both the owner's manual and a service manual.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,892 Posts
All along I thought it was a two stroke, in which case it does not have oil in the crank case like a four stroke. It is called the crank case because the crank shaft is inside the casing.
There is oil in the gear box. The manual will show what type is needed. Same thing for the tank that holds the two stroke oil. I am assuming it has a tank and oil pump.
If a side cover has been removed, and it has yellow stuff in there, then pic are required.

Unless the OP can answer some simple questions, then it will be difficult to provide much help. My questions have so far gone unanswered.
I am prepared to be a little patient with newbies, but feel they must help themselves as best they can.

UK
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top