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Discussion Starter #1
I have looked through some old postings on storage and not seen a answer to my question which is storing a bike in a garage that is heated most of the time in winter and in hot and humid rest of the year do you cover a bike with a cycle cover or not, to protect it from moisture on the chrome. I am restoring 1970"s bikes to the point that all the chrome has been polished and any rust or dirt is gone. chrome is not perfect but looks good for the age. Just occasional riding and not going to clean them all the time just as needed. Thanks for your ideas:confused:
 

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If you want to keep the dust off, an old sheet would be better than a standard cycle cover, as cycle covers are made to shed rain; that is, they are relatively water proof, and will hold moisture inside. Fresh wax on all exposed parts, buffed out, is the best preparation, given your storage conditions.
 

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I think the main reason to use a 'cover' is to protect the paint from the UV light of the sun, but since your situation is inside a garage, that's not even a possibility. Like WintrSol said, though, you might throw a sheet over to keep the 'dust' off, but otherwise, i don't think a 'cover' is needed, either.
 

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Nightfly
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I agree, an old sheet would probably work well. Years back I worked in a speed shop and we sold a lot of car covers for high end auto's. If the vehicle is kept outside you definitely want a breathable cover with a soft inner lining. Stay the hell away from those cheap covers that feel like plastic. They do not breath and they keep moisture under the cover, and that is where you run into problems.

My Harley is kept in an unheated garage and I cover it with large 100% cotton beach towels. Works for me, keeps the dust off and never a problem with moisture.

At one time I kept the bike in a friends garage that was mostly unheated. Except the times he would go out in the winter to do some work and then crank up the heat. That heat on an ice cold bike created the worst moisture problem I've ever had. Storage was free but the moisture was killing my bike. Had to move out of there.
 

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American Legion Rider
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I use a cover to keep the dust down, it also is vented to allow the moisture to escape.
I'd still recommend you remove it now and then. I've still seen moisture collect under them. Especially in humid climates. Let it REALLY breathe from time to time.
 

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Troublemaker
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I ride every month of the year and the barn is well ventilated. I also don't keep bikes long enough for them to rust, it's just an obsession of mine.
 

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Visionary
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We keep our bikes in a dusty old gravel floor garage, with no heat it's usually dry though from time to time with weather changes the bikes condense some moisture. It's drafty enough that they soon dry though when the weather changes and I don't see any problems with moisture causing corrosion on the bikes. I thought about using a sheet to keep dust off but I was concerned that it might make the moisture that does collect linger longer so I decided not to take the chance.
 

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If you do get condensation on it, then a regular sheet would tend to hold it on longer. A towel on the seat covers would be better in that case, then just wash the bike to remove the dust (if you care) before riding. Or, a sheet-sized piece of cheese cloth, if the dust may include chemicals that can cause corrosion when damp, like unmixed concrete, fertilizers, or lime.
 

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Troublemaker
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I'd like to see what they say if that was a working barn where there are horses and cows in it once in a while. Our bikes get to see the old fashioned rides getting new shoes put on by a strange little guy that only comes around every couple months.

Some day, after I hit the lottery, our bikes will have a nice clean place like Grace's bikes have. Then I will get them a nice wipedown every time I go out to see them.

The wind is going to blow 30 mph today, the covers are the only shield they have from the blowing earth particles that will be filling the air. The cats don't seem to mind the covers either, they can get under them and rest their poor tired bodies on the seats all day long too.
 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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I believe you can get indoor covers that breath and are not water proof.
 

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Shaper Of All Things Metal
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I believe you can get indoor covers that breath and are not water proof.
They are available! I have one for my bike which is always in an insulated garage. I only use it in the winter when the bike sits longer periods. When I'm riding regularly, it doesn't get used.
 
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