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Discussion Starter #1
Ok guys and gals...

When mating two parts with a gasket, would you:

A: Use a cork/rubber gasket.

B. Use a gasket maker like Permatex

C. Both A and B

If have a nice rubber/cork gasket, but I'm really partial to liquid gaskets...torn on what to do?

How about...

A: Small bead of permatex on the gasket and then stick the gasket to the cover.
B. Small bead of permatex on the other side of the gasket and then stick the cover and gasket to the engine.

Would using both create a better seal or poorer seal?
 

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ZAMM Fanatic
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There are two equally divided camps in the auto repair world. Dry guys vs. Goopers.

Decide which camp you're in.

Mind you, the auto industry did without goop JUST FINE for over 75 years...

I clean the surfaces well and use a dry gasket. Goop never did anything for me other than make a mess.

I've found too many goop balls plugging oil passages, jamming thermostats, heater cores, floating around inside differentials .... the goop guys never seem to know when enough is enough. They seldom wait long enough for it to actually harden before starting the motor, or allowing the customer to do so. And they try and use goop to solve a problem once they've destroyed the mating surfaces with wire wheels, files, ... yeah, just go BUY a new thermostat housing already!!!

If the mating surfaces are clean and dry, what possible benefit is there to adding goop TO a gasket?

You'll have to find a gooper to answer that.
 

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When we rebuild my motor I was suprised to see a rubber gasket. Been used to seeing the old cork gaskets. But it did make setting the valve covers easier.we used just a dap of permatex on the corners.
 

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Save them all!
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My feeling on the matter is similar to Wade's. I prefer to clean/flatten mating surfaces, then use a gasket.

I guess it would really depend on what was originally there. Some of the Kubota tractors I used to work on had a LOT of goop used from the factory. It worked well as long as you cleaned everything up and used the proper factory goop. I guess if something was gooped originally I would regoop it.

Gooping an existing gasket is a band-aid repair, too. If it needs to be gooped you have other issues there which need to be addressed.
 

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What?
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I use a bit of goop when I drop the transmission pan on my truck. Mainly to hold the thin rubber gasket in place. I also use it on my differential covers on my truck. Engine components, I would use the OEM gasket or material unless the mating surface is borked. Only then would I use goop.
 

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I have done a LOT of machinery repair, rebuilds, restoration, and maintenance over the years and my answer is:

It depends. :icon_cool:

Usually I use whatever method the manufacturer used initially.

If the gasket is prone to leaks, I may use a little Permatex #2 - also good for a joint that may have to come apart later and you want to save the gasket or a joint where there is some movement. Permatex #2 isn't good for high pressure because it will allow the gasket to creep.

For a gasket with a thin cross-section (under pressure) or a poorly designed joint where the gasket wants to squirt out when you tighten the joint (like on some Fords!), I will glue the gasket to one side with gasket shellac, let it dry, and use gasket shellac on the other side when assembling (good luck getting that joint apart later! LOL!) or use Permatex #2 on the other side to make disassembly easier later.

Of course head gaskets, exhaust gaskets, and other specialized gaskets go in dry or as the manufacturer specifies.
 

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My philosophy. Do what the factory did. And generally, if you goop, don't use a gasket. If you use a gasket, don't goop. I like to use a gasket. But there are times where the parts were not mated with a gasket right from the factory. The old 7.3l International made diesel in my ford truck did not use a gasket on the oil pan. It came with sealant right from the factory. People that try to make and use a gasket generally find that it will leak.
 
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