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Discussion Starter #1
I told a shortened version of this story on another thread, and people seemed to like it, so l thought l would tell the whole story here.

About 15 years ago my first wife and l started going to this little country church near the town we had moved to, just a half hour outside of Seattle. We were doing the usual stuff, going to barbeques, group events, and generally getting to know everyone. There was this older man that l was immediately drawn to. I don't remember his name, but he rode a Harley with his wife on the back, and once in a while she rolled up on a bike of her own. They were pushing 70 years young. At the time l just had an old Suzuki enduro that had lost its blinkers and just got ridden in the dirt, but l was, of course, interested in anything that resembled a ride.

As Summer approached he started talking about the trips they would be taking. They were members of a club called the "Cycle Disciples" and they went on rides and did spread the gospel around. During our conversation he asked if l had ever ridden on the street, and l told him l had, but the biggest bike l had ridden was my 700 Sabre, and l had never ridden a tour bike. "That's no big deal," he said. "My bike was the first bike my wife ever rode, and she just started a couple years ago!"

I was shocked! His bike was a big old full dresser, something along the lines of a Road King or and Ultra Glide, with tons of chrome and big trunks, and a massive full fairing windshield. The idea of riding it intimidated the heck out of me. I looked at him and said, "How the heck did that happen?" So he told me the story.

He had ridden for decades, and when they met she naturally just got on the back and rode along. They were young and travelled around all they could. For years and years she had talked about learning to ride but just never had. When they were at home life always got in the way, and when they were on the road, they just had their great routine, and so time just went by.

When they retired they really started going on a lot more trips, and it started nagging at her that she was now in her 60's and had still never ridden. The whole thing was beginning to just get bigger and bigger in her mind, until this one morning when they were on a trip, and were camping at a campground. I believe he said it was in Oregon. Anyway, after breakfast she told him that she thought it was about time she learned how to ride herself, and that even though she was nervous and scared, she wasn't getting any younger. He was very supportive and told her that if she wanted to learn to ride, then she should just go for it. He figured she would just take the course when they got home, maybe get a little bike, or something like that. He had no idea she meant RIGHT NOW! Next thing he knows, she is over on his bagger firing it up, helmet on and ready to go for a spin! He got up and went trotting over there.

"It has taken me 35 years to get up the guts to do this!" she shouted over the noise of the bike. "Don't you DARE say no to me!"

My friend chose his words wisely.

"Do you mind if l give you a few pointers?" She said okay, and he showed her how to work the controls, let her find the friction zone with the clutch and then just said what the heck? I can't stop her! And off she rode, with his half ton machine she went, around and around the campground that lady went, all 66 years and 150 pounds of her, and he said she grinned from ear to ear the whole time. Finally she stopped and let him load up and haul her home. When she got home she went and took the motorcycle safety class and bought herself a Deluxe :)
 

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My first desire, when I bought my first motorcycle in the mid-eighties, was for my wife and I to go together on rides (Goldwing style) to various places we like to visit. I fantasized about she and I riding out (three hours) to a small town in Rhode Island, to show up for a family reunion, on the bike, during the autumn months, with the smell of wood fires in the air; Apple Cider and warm fresh donuts, fresh out of the oven. Apple pies and Church Harvest Suppers..........

My first bike wasn't a Goldwing however, but she took a couple of short rides with me on the Honda Shadow (not really a great bike for touring) and that's about it. I had hopes of upgrading to a Touring Bike, but that never happened. The "rides" went well enough, but the bike was clearly too small for the two of us together.

In 2006 my wife was struck with Multiple Sclerosis, and was paralyzed from the waist down. She had to give up 20 years of Nursing (and Nursing Management) because of it.

It was and still is a tough road for her, never mind the "bike touring" dream.

Go get your dreams as you can. Be mindful of all your obligations to all that you are committed to, and enjoy and employ all the gifts you are given.

It's always great to hear the stories of those who find themselves seeking to expand their horizons, and who are able to accomplish their goals.

("Yes," we have talked about a Trike, but we are not in any position to be buying one. Even the purchase of this current bike was a miracle in itself. However, because of the nature of the extenuating symptoms that she has and lives with every day, she couldn't go for "rides" of any length).

I heard a report just yesterday, about the average age of Americans, or something like that, and it was "over fifty."
I don't doubt it. The Baby Boom (of which I'm a part) was a large group. AFTER the "Baby Boomers," came MUCH smaller numbers.........so much so, that schools were closed, that were not needed.

More and more these days, because of longer life expectancies, folks are demonstrating more of a "go and do it" behavior, than ever before. The Report spoke of a more "devil may care" attitude among the Senior set these days, and I see that as reflective of who we were in the 60's. The same..........just older.

We've grown tired of fighting with the "Establishment" (besides, most of them are DEAD now, and WE are "the Establishment".......cough, cough) and have decided to find peace in the midst of the storm. Perhaps something we should have learned better, in the 60's.

We SAID "Peace" with our mouths and with our hands (the "Peace Sign") but internally we were churning, and chomping at the bit.

Now, we are finally learning how to let that Daisy on the side of our VW Bus really MEAN something, in our lives!!

-Soupy
 

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I'm glad that I finally decided to take the plunge and learn how to ride. It's the only thing keeping me going as I sit here and wait for my biopsy results to come in, and it will be what gives me the strength to fight if the results come in as expected. Knew it was gonna get me, as it has gotten every female in my family. Breast Cancer, or any cancer, sucks dog fur.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
My first desire, when I bought my first motorcycle in the mid-eighties, was for my wife and I to go together on rides (Goldwing style) to various places we like to visit. I fantasized about she and I riding out (three hours) to a small town in Rhode Island, to show up for a family reunion, on the bike, during the autumn months, with the smell of wood fires in the air; Apple Cider and warm fresh donuts, fresh out of the oven. Apple pies and Church Harvest Suppers..........

My first bike wasn't a Goldwing however, but she took a couple of short rides with me on the Honda Shadow (not really a great bike for touring) and that's about it. I had hopes of upgrading to a Touring Bike, but that never happened. The "rides" went well enough, but the bike was clearly too small for the two of us together.

In 2006 my wife was struck with Multiple Sclerosis, and was paralyzed from the waist down. She had to give up 20 years of Nursing (and Nursing Management) because of it.

It was and still is a tough road for her, never mind the "bike touring" dream.

Go get your dreams as you can. Be mindful of all your obligations to all that you are committed to, and enjoy and employ all the gifts you are given.

It's always great to hear the stories of those who find themselves seeking to expand their horizons, and who are able to accomplish their goals.

("Yes," we have talked about a Trike, but we are not in any position to be buying one. Even the purchase of this current bike was a miracle in itself. However, because of the nature of the extenuating symptoms that she has and lives with every day, she couldn't go for "rides" of any length).

I heard a report just yesterday, about the average age of Americans, or something like that, and it was "over fifty."
I don't doubt it. The Baby Boom (of which I'm a part) was a large group. AFTER the "Baby Boomers," came MUCH smaller numbers.........so much so, that schools were closed, that were not needed.

More and more these days, because of longer life expectancies, folks are demonstrating more of a "go and do it" behavior, than ever before. The Report spoke of a more "devil may care" attitude among the Senior set these days, and I see that as reflective of who we were in the 60's. The same..........just older.

We've grown tired of fighting with the "Establishment" (besides, most of them are DEAD now, and WE are "the Establishment".......cough, cough) and have decided to find peace in the midst of the storm. Perhaps something we should have learned better, in the 60's.

We SAID "Peace" with our mouths and with our hands (the "Peace Sign") but internally we were churning, and chomping at the bit.

Now, we are finally learning how to let that Daisy on the side of our VW Bus really MEAN something, in our lives!!

-Soupy
You and l are in a similar boat, Soupy. My girlfriend has brain cancer and deals with pain everyday. Some days, like today, are great days with few flare-ups. Other days it seems like every time she turns around something is making things worse. She has a rare condition called trigeminal neuralgia...it is set off by strong odors, loud noises and, strangely enough, sneezing. (A sneeze sends a lot of pressure up through her nasal passages and immediately spikes her pain to a horrible level). She could ride with me if she wanted, but she isn't really interested. She worries that she could have a seizure on the bike and make us crash, or that being out in the elements would expose her to stink factors that would ruin our trips. Cigarette smokers are one of the biggest problems, and on a bike you can't just roll the windows up. In any case, l feel you, man.

BTW, l just noticed that you live in Connecticut. I am heading out that way next month. We are going to drive through New England and see the Fall colors. I am really looking forward to it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'm glad that I finally decided to take the plunge and learn how to ride. It's the only thing keeping me going as I sit here and wait for my biopsy results to come in, and it will be what gives me the strength to fight if the results come in as expected. Knew it was gonna get me, as it has gotten every female in my family. Breast Cancer, or any cancer, sucks dog fur.
I will be praying for you to have a clean biopsy, zippy. I work in a hospital and know all too well what cancer is all about. I hope you get a clean bill of health and can move forward in life, and not be held back no matter the outcome. And do know that you can go on and live each day to its fullest no matter what life throws at you. My girlfriend had a tennis ball sized tumor taken out of her brain 8 years ago and it left her with no control center filter in her brain. If you or l walk past a smoker, we smell the smoke and maybe it is distasteful to us. When she gets a whiff of cigarette smoke it goes straight to her brain and spikes her pain to debilitating levels. The same thing happens when she hears real loud sounds, like fireworks or sirens, or smells strong perfumes or colognes. Or when she sneezes. It makes it really hard for her to go out in public, because everywhere you turn you find a smoker or someone who wears too much cologne, or some ambulance goes rolling by. One time we were having the greatest day, and l was grilling steaks. The BBQ got a little smoky and set off the fire alarm. It took me a minute to get it shut off, and by the time l did she was curled up in a knot on the couch in excruciating pain that lasted for two days.

Sounds pretty depressing, doesn't it? But she doesn't let it stop her one bit. She is a project manager at Microsoft, which is an extremely stressful job, and she just shines despite her limitations. She spent thousands of dollars to get a service dog specially trained to sniff out stinky stuff, which reduces her instances by one third, maybe half. She has a map of the world with a pin stuck in every place she has been, and it looks like a porcupine. Many of the trips have been after she had the tumor removed, because she insists on living while she can. Every day we have some hurdles, but most days we have some good time, and once in a while she goes through an entire day without getting flared at all, and those days we truly cherish. Our glass is always completely full...we aren't really interested in half a glass of whatever it is we're drinking :)
 

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I'm glad that I finally decided to take the plunge and learn how to ride. It's the only thing keeping me going as I sit here and wait for my biopsy results to come in, and it will be what gives me the strength to fight if the results come in as expected. Knew it was gonna get me, as it has gotten every female in my family. Breast Cancer, or any cancer, sucks dog fur.
Zippy, if you get the long face from your doctor at least keep us informed. We really do care about each other here. Best of luck to you, you may be the one to break that trend in your family. After all only 50% of your genes come from your mother.
 

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Yes, hang in there zippy. It's best to find a problem and do something about it while you can.
 

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Ya, I won't find out anything until the 23rd. It's the earliest appt I can get into the surgeons office. He won't give results, good or bad, over the phone. The wait is the killer.
 

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I hope the worrying is the worst part, and they come back with a clean bill of health for you, zippy.
Barring that, here's to beating the crap out of that cancerous blob.

to the OP, I had a bike back in high school - a beater of a GS750 (my friend decided the only way to get it to run was squirt a half can of carb cleaner right into the bowls - I don't recommend it, but the flames are pretty).
Fast forward 30+ years, and I was able to explain to mywife that I'd regret it the rest of my life if I didn't get back on a bike. It took convincing, but she finally uunderstood. took the msf, and now I'm still taking lessons and buying my gear til I get my bike next season.
Wish I'd stayed with it back then, but I'm glad I took the second chance now.
 

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Ya, I won't find out anything until the 23rd. It's the earliest appt I can get into the surgeons office. He won't give results, good or bad, over the phone. The wait is the killer.
I understand completely, as a cancer survivor myself. Waiting for that first official proclamation that they think they got it all is tough but you can do it. For some reason the folks involved think it is better to tell you face to face that they are 70%, 90% or whatever percentage sure that they got it all. It is like holding back that percentage of uncertainty is somehow better when you don't hear it over the phone but hear it in person. Sorry but I disagree with that. I am now 13 years post surgery and post radiation therapy and am fairly confident they got it all but even today my surgeon will not say so outright. Instead he says stupid things like at 4 years any new cancer, of the type I had, is not considered a recurrence but a new cancer but he wants to see me again in a year. OK, so why does he want to see me again? Does he really think I am that dense?
 

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Welcome, El Guapo! What kind of bike are you looking for?
Hi, Hawkaholic. I'm still bouncing between a cruiser and a standard, 650 to 750 cc. Sadly, we spent way too much money this year, so my bike is pushed to next year. So I'm slowly amassing my gear (going out for an armored jacket this weekend), and sitting on a lot of bikes. The S40 and V Star 650 are at the top of the list so far, though the Shadow 750 is moving up through the ranks.
 
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