Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Fellow riders,

I'm toying with the idea of getting a 600cc. I have put 4500 miles on my 300 since I bought it back in november. Luckily I live in Socal so I'm riding it everyday. I feel comfortable enough to move on to my next adventure in riding. I'm not looking to pop wheels or go 120 between lanes on the freeway.

How long did it take for everyone to upgrade? Am I rushing this or should I go with my instincts? I know you can never have enough experience when it comes to riding.

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
619 Posts
What would a 600 offer you that the 300 does not? Every time I consider upgrading, it makes me think about how much money I'm going to have to spend to do it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Fellow riders,

I'm toying with the idea of getting a 600cc. I have put 4500 miles on my 300 since I bought it back in november. Luckily I live in Socal so I'm riding it everyday. I feel comfortable enough to move on to my next adventure in riding. I'm not looking to pop wheels or go 120 between lanes on the freeway.

How long did it take for everyone to upgrade? Am I rushing this or should I go with my instincts? I know you can never have enough experience when it comes to riding.

Thanks
I believe you can do it honestly if you baby step into it..if you respect your life and the bike you can hop on a 600cc sportbike just know it's more power so you don't need to crank that trottle back like you do with the 300.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Calculon- I agree more money, but the excitement is what's pushing me, then again how long will that last..

Darius- for sure, baby steps, it'll be a whole new learning curve.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Yes main thing I would suggest is trottle control..when you get your 600cc sport bike what ever That may be learn how to give it power without giving it power..I started on my R1 but I took the msf class every year and when I first purchased my R1 I revved it like I revved that 250 in the msf class and it redline with them bigger bikes you have to understand theirs less room for error and your mistakes are amplified I never dropped my r1 and I ride everyday it's over 45 degrees and no snow..some people do not deserve a 600+ sport bike if you want to push a bike to its limit on a street you sould go buy a mopad but if your going to respect the bike I think anything is possible theirs my 02 R1 I love her. (no im not saying go buy a huge bike your not comfortable on)
 

Attachments

·
Nightfly
Joined
·
3,718 Posts
I'm not one who says you should "move up" and buy a bigger bike every year or maybe 6 months. It can get too expensive. Buy the bike you "really" want and the one you can afford. If you haven't the common sense to be judicious with the throttle and have the proper respect for the bigger bike or any bike for that matter, then maybe you shouldn't be riding.

Very few people ride their bike to its limits. People buy Corvettes, Lamborghini's, Ferrari's with incredible horsepower and handling capabilities, how many of those have any experience with that kind of car? Not many, most I see around here are stop light drivers who like quick acceleration, very few take twisties or take their Ferrari to it's over 200 mph limit. Most are too busy laying on the next coat of wax. Buy what you want, you'll get the hang of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
I'm not one who says you should "move up" and buy a bigger bike every year or maybe 6 months. It can get too expensive. Buy the bike you "really" want and the one you can afford. If you haven't the common sense to be judicious with the throttle and have the proper respect for the bigger bike or any bike for that matter, then maybe you shouldn't be riding.

Very few people ride their bike to its limits. People buy Corvettes, Lamborghini's, Ferrari's with incredible horsepower and handling capabilities, how many of those have any experience with that kind of car? Not many, most I see around here are stop light drivers who like quick acceleration, very few take twisties or take their Ferrari to it's over 200 mph limit. Most are too busy laying on the next coat of wax. Buy what you want, you'll get the hang of it.
Totally agree with this
 

·
So long
Joined
·
2,753 Posts
I agree with Hawk. If you're comfortable and proficient on your 300 then you're ready to move up.

What model do you have in mind? You mentioned you're considering a 600cc. If you're thinking Honda CBR600RR, I'd suggest the CBR650F instead if you can handle the extra weight. It's power delivery will be more friendly as you build skills to the next level. Also, it's about $3,000 less than the 600RR. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the input everyone. One thing I realize is it doesn't matter what kind of bike you have there is always a risk. For instance this past sunday. I'm cruzin down the 91 west freeway back home around 11pm.. I notice this van in the express lane appearing to merge over. keep in mind the express lane has these plastic upright dividers that split the express from normal lanes. Obviously these are there for a good reason. I have about a good 10 ft between me and the diver as he decides to run over the dividers and merge into my path. I drop a gear, blip, and hit both breaks. Alll in a blink if an eye.

As far as pushing my bike to its limits I would say yes, twisties, freewys, city roads all within in a safe speed. Taking off smoothly, stopping on a dime, counter steeting, understanding the friction zone on the clutch lever.

The bike I am considering is a ninja 636. Money is not the concern, riding responsible is and I'm confident I will.

To the point about a sports car, I have one in the garage that will do 0-60 in 4 sec flat. I'm not the type to gun on the line, that's what a track is for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,012 Posts
To the point about a sports car, I have one in the garage that will do 0-60 in 4 sec flat. I'm not the type to gun on the line, that's what a track is for.
I don't know of a single sport bike rider that doesn't ride more quickly on the street than they should. Not one, myself included. I'm sure there are exceptions as there are to every rule but I don't think youre one of them...lol. You are going to test that bike on the street, and with it, YOUR limits. Its inevitable. Just use your brain about when and where you do it.

The skills you posted about knowing well are only the very beginning of riding. No MSF course is going to prepare you for a sport bike in a hot corner. If youre going to buy a bike like that, get some instructional material to help you learn how to handle it. I would STRONGLY recommend A Twist Of The Wrist II by Keith Code. Study it, practice it and make it your every-single-ride companion. I know 11 people that went down last year and every single one of them could have easily been prevented. Not because the bike was being pushed but because all of them rode over their heads and violated the very first rule put forth in that book...among others.

Buy it, enjoy it and learn how to ride it correctly. Otherwise you will suffer the consequences. Not trying to be harsh, just giving you my 2 cents in hopes that you will take it to heart. And welcome to the world of sport bikes. Its one heck of an addiction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
When you're moving up in powers or CCs you'll basically have to contend with two things. Extra weight and increased throttle sensitivity. The extra power will be there not until you choose to use it.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top