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Discussion Starter #1
I've been avoiding this one big hill like the plague. One of these hills where due to traffic, you have to stop atleast once, maybe twice on it. Its a pretty steep incline, one of these hills that don't get much traffic during snowstorms. Well, today, I decided to just do it. Of course, it would be full of leaf peeper traffic.....I didn't stall it on the biggest part, was pretty smooth just used the friction zone to inch up while traffic started to move a little here and there. Got all the way to the top, and where the hill starts to level off, I thought too much and stalled it....go figure......

I'm really happy with the progress I've made so far in my first season of riding. I still have alot to learn, but I'm getting much better than I was when I first started. My speed is picking up nicely, though I haven't had the urge yet to open her full throttle. 60-65 is my highest speed, and only on straight aways. That's all I really need anyways. The death grip is gone, and I can actually let go of the handlebars with one hand now. Not that the wave is a must do, but it's nice to be able to do it. Don't feel like a snob now.
 

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That's really cool Zippy. I am happy to hear that your confidence is building :)

I just turned 500 miles on my bike since l bought it, and l have noticed that l feel much more in control of my bike, like l am riding my bike rather than someone else's bike, or my NEW bike. I'm just riding my bike.

My biggest fear has been leaning into a corner. It is all mental. I know that l am capable of leaning into the corner and finding the road, and l know that my bike is capable of outcornering my ability...but when l go into a corner l have this fear that l will lay it down if l really lean into it. So what l have been doing is making a point of getting a nice lean and working on it every time l ride. In the past couple of weeks my cornering has definitely improved. What's more, l have also been making a point to not get too far ahead of myself, and allow myself to learn gradually, rather than getting a head full of myself and thinking l am ready for the Isle of Mann :)
 

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I think if you work on making your turns nice and smooth, the leaning will work itself out. Judging a proper entry speed and having smooth throttle control through the turn is key.

Starting on a hill requires good clutch and throttle control. It just takes practice.
 

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Its always a good feeling when making a brake through :) I remember when I was a afraid of my bike but one day I took a nice long ride and after that, I wasn't afraid of it anymore. I will always have a healthy fear of riding but its nice when you can stop squeezing the gas tank with your legs and just enjoy yourself. I think I learn something new every time I get on the bike!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ya i gotta work on getting rid of my chicken strips too. But like dods says its better to just concentrate on good throttle control and entry speeds rather than how far you can lean. But it is good to know how far you can lean incase you come into a corner too hot.
 

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I've been avoiding this one big hill like the plague. One of these hills where due to traffic, you have to stop atleast once, maybe twice on it. Its a pretty steep incline, one of these hills that don't get much traffic during snowstorms. Well, today, I decided to just do it. Of course, it would be full of leaf peeper traffic.....I didn't stall it on the biggest part, was pretty smooth just used the friction zone to inch up while traffic started to move a little here and there. Got all the way to the top, and where the hill starts to level off, I thought too much and stalled it....go figure......

I'm really happy with the progress I've made so far in my first season of riding. I still have alot to learn, but I'm getting much better than I was when I first started. My speed is picking up nicely, though I haven't had the urge yet to open her full throttle. 60-65 is my highest speed, and only on straight aways. That's all I really need anyways. The death grip is gone, and I can actually let go of the handlebars with one hand now. Not that the wave is a must do, but it's nice to be able to do it. Don't feel like a snob now.
Well done Zippy. We all go through a period where we are almost competent in some aspect of riding but are not confident that we are ready for the next step. It really comes down to how much you trust yourself. If you felt good on that up hill road, you are ready to step up your game even if you don't quite feel it yet.
As far as wide open throttle, try just accelerating hard next time you are on an interstate on-ramp. You already want to speed match to merge well, so just go for it. You may be surprised at how much less stress you feel when you are just changing lanes at the end of that acceleration strip.
As far as chicken strips, I have been riding for well over 45 years and I still have them. Knowing your limits is important. Unless you are riding a sport bike with teenage drivers you have enough sense that you will have some chicken strips. Don't let the attitude of sport bike riders make you do something stupid. Squids live by their own rules and the rest of us drive more conservatively.
 

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Yeah, wear chicken strips like a metal of honor. You are no idiot living on the edge. There just aren't that many reasons to live on the edge in normal everyday riding. Racing on a track yes. I still have a bump where the long stringy thing was on mine after 8k miles. Simply means I've been there but not all the time. There really isn't a need. I'm pretty sure they would be longer if it wasn't for the gravel I am forced to ride in. Anyway, no one should worry about having them. You are not a fool is a good thing.
 

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My biggest fear has been leaning into a corner.
Well ok then, how about not INTENTIONALLY leaning but instead...

Countersteering harder (which makes you lean)
One butt cheek off the seat toward the inside of the corner (which makes you lean)
Looking further ahead down the road (which makes you lean).
Chin-over-wrist, or "Kiss the mirror" (which makes you lean)

If you're struggling to lean sufficiently it's probably because you're looking down, looking 15' ahead of the bike instead of ahead to the exit of the turn.

Leaning should occur naturally as the bike is countersteered and the gyroscopic forces act on the motorcycle. It shouldn't really be something you have to think about or force to occur.

Anyone else concur, or disagree?

Cheers!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Ya, I'm not too worried about the chicken strips. I'd rather just ride my own ride. I'd rather just cruise than rip things up anyways. Most of the guys I do ride with on occasion usually just let me take the lead so I can ride at my own pace without having to feel like I've got to keep up. I'm just having too much fun riding to risk crashing and not being able to ride tomorrow. So I'll wear my chicken strips like a badge of honor, like the bugs on my helmet are my body counts.....
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Leaning should occur naturally as the bike is countersteered and the gyroscopic forces act on the motorcycle. It shouldn't really be something you have to think about or force to occur.

Anyone else concur, or disagree?

Cheers!
See I don't feel like I'm actually leaning my body, just going with the bike. Just like the bike seems to pick itself up exiting the corner. Just seems to happen natural to me. But I know I must be doing something to get the bike through the corner, cause I feel myself lifting my butt cheek in my cage. It doesn't seem to help steer my cage though.....
 

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Looking ahead will smooth out a curve, and the motorcycle will follow by leaning through the line that the eyes are tracking.

Pushing the handlebar in the direction of the turn rather than trying to "steer" around a corner or otherwise fight the physics of turning might help. It's wasted energy trying to push down on the handlebar to lean the motorcycle. Handlebars don't move that way.

Chin over wrist or hanging to the inside actually makes the motorcycle lean less through the turn, which may be desirable in some cases for ground clearance. I've always thought it's better to enter at a lower speed than needed, then increase speed as desired than to go in so quickly you need to hang off to make the turn. It is a handy tool to have to make up for mistakes, though.

Good throttle control is the key for making a nice smooth turn. On and off the throttle upsets the suspension and makes the steering wobbly. A smooth, slightly increasing throttle through the turn is smoothest.

Misjudging the proper entry speed is probably where riders goof up most often, leading to bad endings in some cases.
 

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Yeah, bar hoppers have never heard the term.:coffeescreen:
 

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Hey Zip, congratulations! FWIW I still stall my bike on steeps now and then. I forget to add a little extra throttle to compensate for a fairly heavy bike. And I'm a guy who NEVER stalls a car on a steep.... I don't even cheat and use the handbrake...


WR2 "Chicken Strips: A fellow rider said to me, "Well, they make you PAY for the whole tire, so why not USE it all?"

That made sense to me and I decided my tires wouldn't have chicken strips.

So every night I get out there with a die grinder and a sanding block...

I find if you have too large a chicken strip there's a wobbly transition when you DO lean the bike over. It feels...uncertain, slippery.

I'm sure the tire "experts" would say that's the point where you need to replace the tire.....OR...you can just start taking corners a little more aggressively ;)
 

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Yeah, bar hoppers have never heard the term.:coffeescreen:
Cowboy, no need to be disrespectful. Eye and I both never heard the term before we got into forums. I ride about 13000 miles each year so I am hardly a bar hopper but on the other hand I am no squid who lives to try to wipe out on a corner. I am just a rider and I ride because I enjoy it, not to prove something about how I manage my tire wear or how fast I can do a corner. I rode the Pig Trail in Arkansas and enjoyed the whole thing along with the view from the top. This view.

No way did I try to keep up with the squids on that road. They had their priorities and I was there to enjoy the scenery. It does not diminish your ride to focus on beauty over technical aspects, it merely says that you are your own rider, not some sheep.
 
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