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hey! my name is andrea and i have yet to take my motorcycle class. i just have a few questions if you would be so kind.

i am planning on moving from florida to oregon in May. it was suggested to me that i wait til i move to take my class. do all licenses transfer state to state without problem? are some classes more difficult than others?
i want to start with something used to make sure this is something I'm going to be crazy about (although i feel pretty certain!) i love the vintage cruiser, cafe style.
what would you guys recommend for me to check out?
im medium build, 5' 4" and fairly strong.
i also get mixed advise on the size bike i should get. someone said "don't ever be that grrl that can't pick up her own bike!"
another said "you need a heavy bike, otherwise gravity works against you in a deep turn and it can come out from under you!"
sorry for so many questions. I'm really excited for this new venture in my life and wanna do it right!
thank you SO MUCH for any help :)
 

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Different states have different rules on how they handle their licensing. Some give a waiver from testing for taking the MSF BRC and others don't.

The classes might vary somewhat, depending on the version of the course used. I don't think there is going to be much of a difference in difficulty, however.

Whoever said that heavier motorcycles were easier to ride doesn't know what they are talking about. Ignore them at all costs.
 

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I agree with dod. Buy a bike that you and you alone are comfortable on. Not what someone else tells you to buy. You learn more and gain more experience if you start on something small and work your way up.
 

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if your asking if the M endorsement will transfer (if you go ahead and get it now) then yes, it should....

listening to others on what bike will be the best for you should only give you a starting point to look....what will work great for one person, may not be what will work for you....I always suggest to new riders to go out to every dealership they can and sit on every bike there...find what "fits" you....

and I have never heard of a "light" bike sliding out from under someone on a corner unless they are riding way too fast....and if that's true, then a heavy bike would do the same thing
 

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I would take the class before you do anything else. I have heard this advice come from others here many times, and the more l think about it, the more l think it is great, sound advice. When you take the class, entry level bikes are provided. My class had some great examples of starter bikes...TU250's (small cruisers), Honda Grom's (small urban commuters) and BMW 650's for bigger riders. The class will give you a lot of info...my instructor was a retired road racer who had hundreds of thousands of miles under his butt. He had survived a couple of good crashes on the street, and many crashes on the track. He understood riding and was very helpful at teaching riding concepts. He also handed out lots of little safety tidbits, he talked about how laws varied from state to state, etc. I walked away with way more than just a certificate of completion. I felt like l got a great start towards an education in motorcycle safety. If l was to move to another state and was forced to take the class again, l would do so happily, because it would be a great opportunity to learn more. Best wishes whatever you decide
 

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..........................i am planning on moving from florida to oregon in May. it was suggested to me that i wait til i move to take my class.............
Yes, the "M" follows you (on your License).

Suggestion: buy your first bike in Oregon, not Florida. Take the Course in May in Oregon, (or June).

Why "buy your first bike in Oregon?" - So you don't have to lug it there from
Florida. (I'd tell you to RIDE it there, but the weather in the next few months would not be sympathetic to you, being "winter" and all that).

Why "Take the Course in May in Oregon?" - So you will have it "fresh" in
your thinking when you get there. The classes will have an "Oregon" flavor
to them, as they will discuss the Laws of THAT State.

By the way, some Oregon folks that I know here, have told me it's pronounced ORE-gun, NOT Ore-GONE! (Seriously..........FYI.......someone there will pick you up on that........you watch!!)

The style of riding may be a bit different, in Oregon, being at a higher elevation and having full blown "Winter." Have you ever experienced a strong "Winter?" Prepare yourself!!

-Soupy
 

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License endorsements do move from state to state with no issues. I took no test when I moved from California to Illinois and I can ride in any state or province with my present endorsement or my previous one. One thing you may want to consider is cost. Check the cost of a basic riding course where you are now and where you will be in the future. Some states support the BRC heavily and others do not support it much at all. That fact could end up making a huge difference to you in terms of hundreds of dollars. Another factor is whether or not you still need to test after taking the course. Some places will waive the riding test and others will not.
 

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welcome. i agree with the advice to take the class in OR and buy your bike there. it will be a lot more straightforward.

I suggest that you buy a starter sport bike first ... take a look at numerous threads in this section on bikes for new riders. It should be easy to buy a used Kawasaki Ninja (or similar) in good shape for a reasonable price. Ride it for a couple of years and then upgrade. Later you can ride any bike that your heart desires and your wallet can afford :)

Have fun. After you pass that class, try to ride with a group of riders who are smart and know how to handle the roads and traffic well. that will really improve your skills and help you to gain confidence and enjoy yourself more.

good luck,
dT
 

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Yes, the "M" follows you (on your License).

Suggestion: buy your first bike in Oregon, not Florida. Take the Course in May in Oregon, (or June).

Why "buy your first bike in Oregon?" - So you don't have to lug it there from
Florida. (I'd tell you to RIDE it there, but the weather in the next few months would not be sympathetic to you, being "winter" and all that).

Why "Take the Course in May in Oregon?" - So you will have it "fresh" in
your thinking when you get there. The classes will have an "Oregon" flavor
to them, as they will discuss the Laws of THAT State.

By the way, some Oregon folks that I know here, have told me it's pronounced ORE-gun, NOT Ore-GONE! (Seriously..........FYI.......someone there will pick you up on that........you watch!!)

The style of riding may be a bit different, in Oregon, being at a higher elevation and having full blown "Winter." Have you ever experienced a strong "Winter?" Prepare yourself!!

-Soupy
Yes, Soupy, my parents are from Oregon and it is pronounced Ore-gun. The only people who pronounce it Ore-gone are people from back east, or occasionally in the movies. (The informant in "Kindergarten Cop" says that the bad guy's wife has run away to Astoria, Ore-GONE).

What part of Oregon are you moving to, Andrea?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
thanks everyone!!!

i am overwhelmed with all the advice! lol
i was planning on buying the bike in Portland anyway, yes who needs extra **** to drag around. its already gonna cost a fortune!
lucky for me, Oregon has a helmet law. otherwise i would really be bad about wearing it!!!! i'll admit it!
i am so excited i can't even tell you! i have always wanted a bike and always figured it would never happen.
i really appreciate all the help, guys. seriously!
 

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Just the beginning

When you pas the MSF you are still a novice and your riding education should be life long. We all pick up bad habits along the way and sometimes need a refresher course to get back on track. A good DVD to buy is called Ride Like a Pro. It is available online and worth the money to buy and time to watch and practice.

In my house, my wife picks her own motorcycle to ride. You have to feel comfortable and confident on whatever you buy. Riding in Florida and Oregon is about as different as you can get in riding terrain. Mountains are a blast to ride but very unforgiving if you make a mistake. Master your ride before you get to aggressive.

I would like to address your comment about wearing a helmet. I live in a state where helmets are optional. I wear one for several reason. 1. Head protection. 2. Element protection & 3. Noise reduction (wear earplugs).

I also wear full gear when I ride. I have seen the benefits of riding ATGATT (All the gear all the time) twice in the last 3 years. Both times I would have been a widower if my wife wasn't wearing the proper gear. :71baldboy:
 

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I just did a weekend trip to Portland from Boise. Did some Advanced Training with TEAM Oregon. They & their courses are outstanding. See: http://www.motorcycleforum.com/showthread.php?t=141010

I'd go to Accuweather and look up the local weather and average temps. The biggest deterrent to year round riding is cold and even more so RAIN. Looks like the winter lows are generally 40ish with lows in the mid-30s. Snow happens but doesn't last.

Free advice: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL10232AD630DFB5E1

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL125B9E486F8F8B3E

Since riding is a perishable skill (like a knife skills must be honed) I'd suggest you take the TEAM Oregon class because it's going to take you time to get settled in and by the time that you're comfortable the spring should be here.

Enjoy!
 

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Cruiser and cafe styles are completely different. Cruisers put your feet forward with all of your body weight on your tailbone. Cafe style has an extreme forward lean, since the handlebars are very very low. I would recommend a compromise, by getting a standard (upright ergos, mid mount foot controls). In any case, sit on whatever you like, and see which bike speaks to you the most. Good luck and ride safe.
 
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