Motorcycle Forum banner
1 - 20 of 46 Posts

·
Save them all!
Joined
·
4,278 Posts
The landing gear look like a DC-3. I've been in several, but never flown in one. (sadly.)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,044 Posts
Compared to the modern small jets, they take forever to gain speed on the runway. I have flown in both. The 3 and the 6 have lasted much longer than planned. They use the DC6 as water bombers in BC. Just like in the movie ?? with Richard Dreyfus, and the tune, Smoke gets in your eyes.

UK
 

·
Nightfly
Joined
·
4,619 Posts
I think you are correct TR, and I had a brain fart. They were all in the back fiddling with a faulty heater, or something like that.
" We're all going on a summer holiday " for those that have not heard Ricky Nelson.

UK
I think you're correct. Apparently those aircraft were not known for their quality, especially their heaters. I think I read they were gasoline powered. That would be really nuts..
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,794 Posts
I think you're correct. Apparently those aircraft were not known for their quality, especially their heaters. I think I read they were gasoline powered. That would be really nuts..
Maybe the same type heater used in the earlier Volkswagen Beetles? Right in front of the windshield, and it had its own spark plug. Functional, when they worked.:surprise:
 

·
American Legion Rider
Joined
·
26,362 Posts
I think you're correct. Apparently those aircraft were not known for their quality, especially their heaters. I think I read they were gasoline powered. That would be really nuts..
Okay, I'm really ignorant. Why would gasoline be nuts. Wouldn't they have gobs of onboard fuel then? I have a friend who has one and uses fuel dumped from the sump of his plane. I think that's what he said anyway. I had never heard of a gasoline heater but I can't see why it would be any worse than diesel, kerosine or natural gas. But that's why I say I'm ignorant on the subject too. Is it nuts just because they were/are unreliable or is there something else. Maybe I shouldn't even ask but I'm truly curious about them since it was just recently that I learned my friend has one and uses it.
 

·
Nightfly
Joined
·
4,619 Posts
I believe gasoline is quite volatile, is it not? To have gasoline coming inside the plane by way of a heater doesn't seem to the best way to heat the plane. When building a race car I was never allowed to have a fuel pressure gauge actually inside the vehicle unless it was an electric gauge with a sending unit.. To have a small copper line with gas inside of it making it a mechanical gauge was a huge no no. For obvious reasons.;..

Long time ago I had a VW 412 that had the gas style heater. Gave great heat, on the few times I could actually get it to work. Usually froze in the winter. That car ran very well, when it wasn't in the shop. Seemed to always be a problem with it;
 

·
Charlie Tango Xray
Joined
·
768 Posts
The DC 3 is a great old plane. I've flown on more than a few. Ridiculously over built, I wonder if the folks that built them back in the day knew their planes would outlive them. And nothing sings a tune like those big old radial engines. I dont think the DC 3 will ever die. There's just too many of them still flying all over the world. I might be biased though because I have a friend involved with a company here in Wisconsin that rebuilds them with more reliable fuel efficient engines and modern electronics.
 

·
American Legion Rider
Joined
·
26,362 Posts
I believe gasoline is quite volatile, is it not? To have gasoline coming inside the plane by way of a heater doesn't seem to the best way to heat the plane. When building a race car I was never allowed to have a fuel pressure gauge actually inside the vehicle unless it was an electric gauge with a sending unit.. To have a small copper line with gas inside of it making it a mechanical gauge was a huge no no. For obvious reasons.;..

Long time ago I had a VW 412 that had the gas style heater. Gave great heat, on the few times I could actually get it to work. Usually froze in the winter. That car ran very well, when it wasn't in the shop. Seemed to always be a problem with it;
Oh I understand volatility of the stuff. I thought the heaters might have been on an exterior wall or something that would limit the risk. I just never seen one on a plane to know better.
 

·
American Legion Rider
Joined
·
26,362 Posts
There's a difference from a true hijacking and the ebb and flow of a thread based on questions and answers Porky.:thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,160 Posts
Shameless hijack alert

UK, you may be thinking of Ricky Nelson who crashed in his DC 3. He and the band all perished in the fiery crash.
Yep and they were on their way back home after they" Went to a Garden Party "

.:eek:

Harriet Nelson was pretty hot, but nothing like June Cleaver, who once said, " Ward, last night don't you think that you were a little hard on the Beaver? "


Sorry, guys, I get like this after a couple of weeks off the bike....
 

·
Visionary
Joined
·
5,405 Posts
Gasoline is more volatile than most heating fuels but with precautions it can be used in heaters, I'm not an expert but I know that gasoline fired heaters were pretty common on all aircraft from small ones all the way up to the biggest airliners as long as they were piston engine powered, the only other alternative was a heater cuff on the engine exhaust which was on some small single engine planes.

Usually these heaters worked fine, there were a few epic examples of malfunctions or design flaws (later corrected) that caused in flight fires and crashes, including a few on DC3 and DC6 aircraft.

Once jets took over a much better and simpler system was designed, the abundant high pressure hot air from the jet engine compressors is bled off and used in ingenious ways to produce heating, cooling, and cabin pressurization.


Oh I understand volatility of the stuff. I thought the heaters might have been on an exterior wall or something that would limit the risk. I just never seen one on a plane to know better.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Miss Mercedes

·
Moderator - Loves All Motorcycles
Joined
·
1,251 Posts
It's amazing how the DC-3 has lasted so long. There are so many of them still flying (and parts so abundant) I wonder if they'll even manage to outlive me?

The C-130 is another old school plane that will outlive its designers.
 
  • Like
Reactions: GatorJoe

·
Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
Joined
·
15,651 Posts
When I was statioed at Rota, Spain there was a DC3 that flew to Madrid and Lisbon then back to Rota. The 'Rota Rocket' was a fun plane to make the trip. What should have been a 2-3 day trip always took at least a week to complete. Always had a couple of day layover waiting for parts. Take offs were the best riding backwards waiting for the wings to flap before we got airborne.
 
  • Like
Reactions: BWB75 and Porky
1 - 20 of 46 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top