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Nightfly
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've always thought that the first start of the day or after a week or so, caused the most wear on the internal parts of the engine.
Years ago when I drove highly modified 62 FI Vette I installed what is known as an Accumulator. I purchased mine from Moroso performance company. The accumulator connects to the pressure side of an engine's oiling system. When the engine is running oil pressure forces reserve oil into the accumulator and compresses the air ahead. If oil pressure should suddenly drop due to hard acceleration or braking, air pressure immediately sends oil to the main galleries. When danger passes the pump is once again primed as oil pressure forces oil back into the Accumulator.

My concern was I wanted something to pre-oil the engine before making a cold start. This worked perfectly for that. Hit the switch just before firing the engine and the engine was brought to full oil pressure.
Wondering if anyone has thoughts about using this device. I don't think there is a reserve tank in the right size to fit on a motorcycle, but then I haven't checked for a while.
 

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Very Famous Person
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Why would you want to do that? Although we don't pre-lube our bike motors before starting, do they really get that much wear? I say this thinking that back when I first rode a bike, in about 1963, motors often had to be rebuilt at 35,000 miles or so. Nowadays they go several hundred thousand miles. I think my Yamahas have ceramic coated cylinder walls and even after 100,000 miles don't burn any oil between oil changes.

I wonder that the cost for something exotic with little benefit would be worth anyone pursuing it. Using a good synthetic oil that leaves a film on the metal surfaces seems to work. :unsure:

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Nightfly
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ron, it's mostly used by racers and such. Can't say if it made a difference in my street driven vehicle but I can see an advantage of its use in racing. I'm well aware of the longevity of current engines, my 20 year old BMW cage can attest to that. I would think it is used as a precautionary tool.
 

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If you just wanted a precautionary action, then I think running a space heater right up against an engine for a half hour or an hour before starting it would be even better. Then all the oil and metal would be closer to operating temps right from the go. There would be almost no cold start wear at all. Plus, that's something that everybody could do for very little expense. :geek:

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American Legion Rider Staff Administrator
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That works too Ron. I remember when I lived in cold country that those first few seconds starting an engine, it would knock terribly until I put an oil pan heater of sorts, a 100 watt light bulb, hanging down near the oil pan. After than my engine starts were no longer sounding like the engine would blow any second, even at -18º. Prior to that I don't think it would have taken very much to blow that engine. Try to do a few hard revs and I bet it would destroy an engine in those cold climes. That's if you could keep the engine running to start with. Those cold conditions are extremely hard on engines. The light bulb trick made all the difference in the world. Today there are oil pan and dip stick heaters for just this reason.
 

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Nightfly
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I believe there are a lot of race teams, and I put drag racers in that mix, that do use heaters of some sort. But we both know that isn't always an alternative. And now with the advent of LED lights that don't give off any heat to speak of, a plain old 100 watt bulb won't do the trick. Certainly warm oil is better than ice cold oil in the morning but can't deny that having full oil pressure before start has to be a plus. I don't think anyone is going to go out and put one on their machine, but it is an alternative, one that doesn't require electricity being available. I think in general we all worry about our oil too much. I never heard of an engine blowing up because of the wrong name brand oil. Correct weight is a plus but not super critical. I've started my performance engines on a below zero day with 20- 50 weight oil. No problem, just an extra second or two for oil pressure to build.
 

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Premium Member
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Generally I fire and go. Kevin Cameron has written about the subject of the oil residue coating the parts. Issue 4 2019 Cycle World. Might be on line, I have not checked, I have the magazine.
UK
 

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Nightfly
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It's been well known for years that oil leaves a thin film on the surfaces of engine parts. Being able to stick to a part and coating it after long periods of non use is a major preventer of wear during a cold start. Just to be clear, a cold start is not just about starting an engine on a cold day or morning, but also those that haven't been started in a while. The factory that builds the engine and race engine builders follow the typical rule that bearing clearance establishes the viscosity of the oil to be used in a given temperature range. With the tighter tolerances of today's street engines and of course race engines, it allows the use of lighter viscosity oil.

I would guess the most important time to pre oil an engine is that which has just been rebuilt and is totally new inside and out. Just my opinion..
 

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Premium Member
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Used to be the dragsters would push with the engine turning over. Once the desired oil pressure was reached, the ignition was switched on. They also said if you get the timing 1 or 2 degrees advanced, it will explode.
UK
 

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Ace Tuner
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I would guess the most important time to pre oil an engine is that which has just been rebuilt and is totally new inside and out
One way would be to remove the oil filter and manually prime the system with a squirt can full of oil.

There are 'assembly lubes' that can be used if it is known that a new engine will not be put in service anytime soon.
One of many reasons to get the break-in oil out of a new bike at 500 ~ 600 miles. (Or sooner if it's mine).

S F
 

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American Legion Rider Staff Administrator
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There are 'assembly lubes' that can be used if it is known that a new engine will not be put in service anytime soon.
I've used STP for this in the past. That engine went 210k miles so something worked if it wasn't the STP.
 
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