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Discussion Starter #1
So I've got an '85 V65 Magna. Been building her back to her glory bit by bit when suddenly, and I mean SUDDENLY, the clutch went. I had to squeeze the handle all the way in to get her to shift at all.
What I tried: The cable doesn't SEEM broken because if I squeeze enough, it pops in gear and I also bled the line on both ends and into the cylinder and replaced fluid.
Clutches normally don't just up and die, do they? I thought they went out pretty gradually? At least on most other bikes I've had anyway.
I don't know, but maybe there's a Magna fan out there that knows some quirky things about these old girls. *cough* Like their gauge needles and how cheaply made they are...
Anyway, thanks for the help and opinions.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It's hydraulic. See, that's what I thought. So I went ahead and bled it. After putting fluid back in the reservoir and pumping the handle, it doesn't build pressure, which leads me to believe the line might be blocked. I've been working at it nonstop and can't seem to figure it out.
 

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It's likely that there is air in the line. You have to follow the proper bleeding procedure to get it out. Simply adding fluid and pumping the handle won't do it.

The air has to be cycled out through the slave cylinder bleeder.

You can see videos online showing how to bleed the clutch. (It's nearly the same procedure as bleeding brakes.)

If you are still stuck, let me know an we'll see if I can give you some basic instructions.
 

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It's likely that there is air in the line. You have to follow the proper bleeding procedure to get it out. Simply adding fluid and pumping the handle won't do it.

The air has to be cycled out through the slave cylinder bleeder.

You can see videos online showing how to bleed the clutch. (It's nearly the same procedure as bleeding brakes.)

If you are still stuck, let me know an we'll see if I can give you some basic instructions.
He's exactly right. Once air is in the system, you need to push it out of the system so that the fluid is the only thing in the system.

The basic premise of a hydraulic system is that a fluid can not be compressed like a gas (air) can. Since a fluid can not be compressed to fit the same amount into a smaller volume, it is ideal for applications such as this where the work you do by pulling the lever is transfered 100% (or more, depending on the surface area of the drive end [master cylinder] and the driven end [slave cylinder] to the part that does the work.

If air is introduced into the system, even a small air pocket can be compressed into a very very small volume as compared to its original volume, and so you're squeezing the lever is doing some work, but all that work is lost because it is compressing that air pocket and not being transferred to the slave cylinder.

I say all of that because sometimes an understanding of how the system is supposed to work can give you a lot more than simply telling you how to bleed the system. In short, I think you're on the right track and have air trapped in the system. Check the master cylinder and slave cylinders for even the smallest signs of dampness at the seals- if fluid can get out, air can get in.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hey guys thanks! I've been out there working and FINALLY got it. Sometimes it just takes a swift kick in the arse to remind you to go back and follow the directions like men always do ;)
I got no leaks, no problems, I was just simply low on fluid and had a bleeder valve issue that was easily resolved. Thanks for all the help! I appreciate your advice Dods and js!
 

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I'm glad you have it sorted out.

Keep an eye on your fluid level to make sure you don't have a leak and monitor for any softness in the lever while you are riding. (You know what that feels like now)
 
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