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It's important for many reasons, paramount of which is safety that your tires have the correct amount of air/ nitrogen in them. Months of storage can really decrease the pressure. We put our bikes on the Hydraulic lift yesterday to service them for the rapidly approaching riding season and instead of 36 front and 41 rear called for, they both were +- 24 psi front and 34 psi rear! We'd already put about 400 miles on them before checking them on just 2 or 3 small rides so we felt safe but then again who knows????:p

Sam:coffeescreen:
 

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Save them all!
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Yup, know what you mean. My 81 GL I usually keep at 32 each, but was down to the mid 20s also after sitting all winter.

The bike feels different after inflating the tires properly!
 

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Driftless Rider
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Great Advice, Porky. When our connection to the road is the size of a postal stamp (remember those?) we need to do everything to make the most of it.

I've been told I can be a bit "fanatic" about pre-ride checks. I rarely have to top them off, but I still feel the need to get out the gauge at least once a week.

With my skinny front tire, I can feel it if it gets even a few pounds low
 

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Aging & Worn
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30 in the front and 35 in the rear on mine.

when I get back home, and we have forty-five degrees in the morning, I'll put it down off the lift, and check em.

Flip the fuel switch to "on"
Pull the steel wool from the tailpipe
unplug the Battery Tender
get the key off the hook on the wall
get my gear on
start er up
check all my lights
check the chain (maybe spray it with a light coating of fresh oil)

take off!!

-Soupy
 

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A legend in his own mind
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I check mine once a week too, I don't like the squirly feeling under me. I always check them before going anywhere in the spring.
Oxygen molecules are smaller than rubber molecules, it slowly escapes through the tires as it sits. Nitrogen molecules are larger and can't get out as easily. I do question how good it is using nitrogen as I believe engineers figure in the fact that standard air expands, nitrogen doesn't expand much if any.
 

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The advantage in using Nitrogen is that the rubber won't oxidise (no oxygen) and it has better thermal and pressure characteristics.

Always check the pressure for some time after a new tubeless tire is fitted, they sometimes don't seat exactly right and may lose some pressure. A couple of good rides should make them fit. I check my tire pressure once a week, but did it every time I went for a ride for about 3 weeks after I had a new rear tire fitted
 

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Pegasus trapped in a human body on a motorcycle
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The factory recommended pressure for my V-max (for an average adult male) is 32psi, front and rear. Even though I am considerably lighter than average, I have found that my ride handles best with 36psi front and rear.
 

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Did it today. The front tire was overinflated to 35psi, that's after a long, though not particularly cold by MN standards, winter. The rear to was a perfect 29psi, so it's all good now.

It was decently warm here today, mid 50°Fs, but very windy, so the ride was short. Tomorrow is supposed be a bit warmer, but much more calm. Hopefully the ride will be longer.
 

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Several years ago I had a guy bring a bike into the shop I was working in and complain that there was a problem with the brakes, and that the bike didn't handle right and there must also be a suspension issue. It had 12 psi in the front tire and no other problems. Amazing.
 

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Not having a lift I'll admit that I probably put off checking tire pressure more than I should. The front wheel is relatively easy to get to, but for the rear tire I need to practically lay down on the garage floor (squatting down with artificial knees is really rough). I end up checking air pressure every few weeks, and with newer tires that seems to work out okay. I keep about 3 lbs. higher than what the manual recommends for my bike and that seems to be the best compromise between comfort and good handling.
 

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I DO have to lay down to check the rear. I just don't trust my jack enough to put it 18 inches in the air. Getting down isn't so bad, it's the getting back up that is literally a pain for me.

I've seen guys on missions with near flat tires. I always point it out and I have yet to see it fail, they always say I just recently checked. Yeah, RIGHT!

Interesting thing though, the last set of tires I got just don't seem to lose air like previous tires. It is a different compound but I never once thought that would make such a difference. I'd swear I'm only adding air because I've checked so many times that I let the air out. Michelin Commander 2's but I also put more in than recommended.

Now they also have Ride-On tire sealant in them so I can honestly see where that might be making a difference. I've used sealant before but it always pooled in the bottom when not moving. This stuff stays put. So it very well may be having less surface area to lose air through. Don't know but I like the combination.
 

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I use one of those 90 degree tire valve extensions. Don't leave it on the tire but screw it on every time I take the tire pressure. Works for me and makes it easier to check pressure and inflate the tire if needed.
 

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I'd also recommend occasionally wheeling the bike into a different position when it's being stored, say every couple weeks, so the tires don't develop flat spots.
 

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Several years ago I had a guy bring a bike into the shop I was working in and complain that there was a problem with the brakes, and that the bike didn't handle right and there must also be a suspension issue. It had 12 psi in the front tire and no other problems. Amazing.
12psi??? I bet it did have some handling problems,geez
 

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A few weeks ago l was having issues with my bike...it just felt wobbly on the front end a little bit. Brought it into the shop at work and checked the tires...17 psi on the front and 24 on the back. No wonder!!! They had just gradually gone down over the course of the Winter. Filled em up and she is back to her old self ;)
 

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You should check them once a week at least really hawk. But many can get away with once a month. The manuals every time you ride seems way to often to me unless you only ride once a month.
 

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Or look at it this way: If you're not going to maintain your bike the way it should be, and you're going to blindly ride it in such a condition that it's likely to cause you to wreck, you might want to wear all your gear. :biggrin:
 

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You should check them once a week at least really hawk. But many can get away with once a month. The manuals every time you ride seems way to often to me unless you only ride once a month.
There is this new invention called TPMS that is pretty cool.

You can buy a kit for a motorcycle that has actual temp and pressure readings (live) so you know when the temp climbs like mad it is time for an explosion lol.
 
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