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Hello ladies and gentlemen.

I was doing a sprocket/chain replacement over the past couple of days. I have actually done this before but for some reason this time I've been having mad problems. So I got everything done, and tight, but when I was riveting the master link, I somehow didn't get it riveted evenly. When I went to try to fix it, I think I may have torqued it down to tight and damaged the rivets. I did get a new master link, but before I go through all the hassle that I'm sure I'm going to go through trying to buzz down the old master link and put on the new one, I was wondering if I could get some opinions on the current status. Basically I was wondering what the probability of this link giving out and killing me at high speeds.

Thank you!
 

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Ace Tuner
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3,557 Posts
It will probably be okay as is, probably but...
I wouldn't even consider running something that will probably not kill me.
My OCD wouldn't let me run something that looks like that anyway.
I'd recommend changing it, for peace of mind if nothing else.

S F
 

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It will probably be okay as is, probably but...
I wouldn't even consider running something that will probably not kill me.
My OCD wouldn't let me run something that looks like that anyway.
I'd recommend changing it, for peace of mind if nothing else.

S F
Same here. My concern would be whether or not the plates are too compressed, causing the O (or X) rings to bulge out, creating an area ripe for corrosion or excessive wear on the the sprocket teeth as it rotates. If you have measuring calipers you can check that and, if it measures in spec, maybe just keep a close eye on it.
 

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I think I may have torqued it down to tight and damaged the rivets.
That is an extreme case of excessive rivet flare.

In my limited experience, the JT soft rivets are quite easily damaged.
Try to achieve the the correct flare and then resist the urge to give it
a little extra for 'good measure'.

I did get a new master link, but before I go through all the hassle that I'm sure I'm going to go through trying to buzz down the old master link and put on the new one
There are a few critical points in the operation:

Lubrication. Make sure the pins and seals are well greased.

Pressing on the side plates. Make sure they are square/even. Measure
the width compared to adjacent links. A typical pressing tool will have a
thread pitch of 1mm, so even a single turn too much is a radical error.
Do the final push in small increments of a quarter turn or less.

Riveting. Use the proper tool. The optimum flare is different for each
brand and type. In all cases, it is a fraction of 1mm. Assuming a pin diameter
of around 5.5mm, a typical flare spec will be somewhere in the range +0.2 to +0.4mm
or 5.7mm to 5.9mm. As with pressing the plates, once you are in the middle of the
required range, resist the urge to keep pushing.

Basically I was wondering what the probability of this link giving out and killing me at high speeds.
I wouldn't use it in that condition. Get a new link (or two) and try again.


Please let us know how you get on with that JT chain in the long run. They used
to have a much shorter life than Japanese made chains. Hopefully they have improved
in recent years.
 

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Nothing like riding fast and thinking that maybe the chain could snap and break things. That thought will probably be with you every time you ride.
30 minutes to fix and that nightmare goes away. AAAaaaahhhh peace of mind.
You also get a bit more practice at riveting. During the last big war, the ladies were riveting. That could be an adjective or a verb, your choice.

UK
 

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Just change it, you obviously don't trust it. I wouldn't either.
 
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2010 Kawasaki Concours 1400
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I would NOT ride around with a link that bad. First thing to do is buy yourself a digital caliper at Harbor Freight for $20 so you can accurately measure how far you press the side plates on, and rivet the master link. Really no use buying and trying to install more master links unless you can install them the right way.
 
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