Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I tightened, cleaned and lubed the chain yesterday, everything seemed fine. Today I heard this sound:

youtube / watch?v=2EIptzacqNc (sorry, I can't post links yet)

Could it possibly be too tight?

The chain is relatively new, so I think it shouldn't be dead yet.

Thanks.
 

·
Save them all!
Joined
·
4,278 Posts

Hard to say. How does the freeplay compare to book specs? Personally I think it sounds a bit dry - maybe lube it again?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I think the slack is fine, even with load applied. But I'm not able to measure it more accurately.. however it's never done that after tightening and I think I do it always the same.

I may lube it again, thanks. But it's been quite (well, really to be honest) dry before the last lubing (long ride without lube) and I didn't hear any sound
 

·
Member Map
Joined
·
23,911 Posts
The chain looks a little tight to me. Re-check the slack and make sure it's in spec to the owner's manual. It's better to be a little on the loose side than too tight.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,274 Posts
There should be more slack, I think, since the chain gets tighter as the shocks are compressed, and the swingarm pulls the chain tighter. If you don't have the factory spec for slack, then disconnect the shocks and raise the rear wheel until the chain is drawn to its tightest position; at that point, there should be very little, but some, slack. Once that is done, reconnect the shocks and measure the slack with the wheel hanging - that will be your minimum from now on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
631 Posts
Looks and sounds a little tight to me. I've had some chains, that when adjusted properly, will tighten up within a 100 miles. Some will loosen. Don't know why, they just do.

I'd loosen that thing up and lube the hell out of it. Ride around for awhile and readjust it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,162 Posts
I have been thinking about this

On my own bikes,I am not so sure about chain tightness. How about stacking a known weight on the seat, as in bags of water softener salt to mimic the rider's weight while having an assistant steady the bike to an upright position?

Thoughts?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,274 Posts
It usually takes more than just the rider's weight to compress the shocks to the point the chain is fully taught, but if you pile on enough ...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,274 Posts
Then you only have to make sure the oil in the banjo is good, and keep the splines and U-joints lubed. A lot less work than a chain, but it will fail, un-announced, if you don't check those things. But, yeah, I like the lower maintenance on my shaft-drive Suzi, as compared to my CB450, and my next bike, a Valkyrie, is also shaft drive.
 

·
Greatest Member Ever
Joined
·
662 Posts
Unfortunately, we can't tell much from that video. PROPER chain adjustment is a combination of many factors. Almost every chain setup has a high spot and a low spot. That means that at some point the chain will be at its tightest, but rotate the rear wheel farther, and it suddenly slacks up. The tension is never gonna be the same at every point of wheel rotation. You must test the chain when it is at its tightest point of the rotation.

With the rear wheel elevated off the ground, you need to rotate the rear wheel until the chain is at its tightest point. That is where you start the adjustment procedure. At that point, there are 2 tests you perform. First, you use your finger to lift the chain on the bottom, halfway between the front and rear sprocket. At its tightest point, it should move up about 1/2 an inch. Then you grab the chain where it rests on the rear sprocket. As you're facing the rear sprocket, you grab the chain at the 3 oclock position and pull it towards the rear of the bike. If it pulls away from the sprocket at all, then the chain has stretched and proper adjustment will be near impossible. (Assuming the rear sprocket is not worn).

Also, when you spin the rear wheel to check the chain (as you did in the video), always spin it in the same direction as the bike goes. In your video, you were spinning it backwards. That will ALWAYS create a funny sound.

And yes, your chain appeared too tight and perhaps a bit dry, but you WERE rotating it in the wrong direction, so hard to say for sure...
 

·
lost
Joined
·
1,106 Posts
If you have access to the owner's manual for that specific bike it should give clear instructions on chain adjustment.

Failing that, understand this:

The tightest spot with reference to suspension compression is when the center of rotation for the front sprocket, the swing arm pivot, and the rear sprocket. In the rest of the arc of travel the chain will be more slack. Correctly tightened shouldn't have the chain taught at that point in the shock travel.

If it is too tight you are putting some unfriendly forces into the system and something will definitely give in a way that is going to leave you unhappy and poorer than you were before it happened.

Oh, and I give what OneEyedJack says a second. Chain slack varies through out the chain. This is due to uneven wear. The fewer cylinders you have the more extreme this can be. A big 4 stroke thumper only yanks on that chain every other engine rev so stresses aren't applied evenly through the chain. Just the top run of the chain is being used to rotate the back wheel.

So, yes, you definitely need to check tension throughout the full length of the chain. Yer fingers are already greasy, so have at it.
 

·
Justa anutta Human......
Joined
·
728 Posts
I'd remove it n have a very good look n feel.
Maybe have a bud that knows a bit about chains have a look n feel.
If chain is good i'd soak it in some gear oil overnight.
Then wipe it down some n install....
Leave slack spin the wheel a bit to see if it have any tite spots......
If so....more slack....
Then ride it a bit.....
U do know how to do proper wheel/chain alignment.....right..?
 

·
Greatest Member Ever
Joined
·
662 Posts
I'd remove it n have a very good look n feel.
Maybe have a bud that knows a bit about chains have a look n feel.
If chain is good i'd soak it in some gear oil overnight.
Then wipe it down some n install....
Leave slack spin the wheel a bit to see if it have any tite spots......
If so....more slack....
Then ride it a bit.....
U do know how to do proper wheel/chain alignment.....right..?

And I'll have some of what he's smoking!!! hehehe.....:p
 

·
lost
Joined
·
1,106 Posts
And I'll have some of what he's smoking!!! hehehe.....:p
LOL! The one clear point he suggested is alignment. The markings on the swingarm are a good starting point but actually getting that rear wheel lined up correctly takes a bit of effort. Once you've done it correctly the index marks can then be used to keep it properly lined up as long as you know how far off they are.
 

·
Justa anutta Human......
Joined
·
728 Posts
Always check ur chain on ur rear sprocket n make sure it is running centered of that sprocket/chain........
Should be a slight space each side of sprocket as ur turning the wheel....
This should hold true 80-90 percent of the spin....
I've found it is ur best way to be sure all is aligned....
Well unless ur Engine mounts are very loose, but....
U should know that by all the noise that will make...
Chains need to run centered on sprockets if ur running chains.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
questions and clarifications

Can someone explain to me how suspension affects chain tension? Maybe it is because: when load-bearing, the swing-arm moves up (more horizontal), thereby increasing the distance between front and rear sprocket?

When I ride double-up, the chain drags along the center-stand. I realize that a large part of the problem is that I have bad rear shocks (the new ones are in the mail), but I still don't really understand it!? The bike sags, so the center-stand pivots up to hit the chain?

Also, according to the adjustment marks, my rear wheel should be aligned straight, and yet at one point of the chain, I get 1/2 an inch of free-play, but when rotating, at another point, there is 1&1/2 inch of free play. Does this mean that my chain is toast, or could something else be going on?

Uneven chain stretch is related to engine revolution?

I know, I know, so many questions!
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top