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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
I've owned a Hyosung 125cc manual bike for around seven years (my first bike and done around 15,000km) and I managed to sell it to get the CB600F after years of saving. But when talking to more experienced guys I was told to go for a more tamed bike like the CB500F rather than a 4 cylinder high rev bike. I will be using the bike mostly for commuting. What do you think?

I have some experience with riding a bike but I cannot tell that I have experience with danger avoidance etc since I always drive on the cautions side and I never go near any limits.
 

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The 600 only develops any significant power at higher RPM's so it's all up to you as the rider and how far you twist the throttle. You have a great bike now---enjoy and be careful.:biggrin:

Sam:coffeescreen:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The 600 only develops any significant power at higher RPM's so it's all up to you as the rider and how far you twist the throttle. You have a great bike now---enjoy and be careful.:biggrin:

Sam:coffeescreen:
thanks Porky .... do you know if there is a way to restrict the by how much the throttle can be twisted? At least this could be a good idea for the first 6 months.
 

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Hi,
I've owned a Hyosung 125cc manual bike for around seven years (my first bike and done around 15,000km) and I managed to sell it to get the CB600F after years of saving. But when talking to more experienced guys I was told to go for a more tamed bike like the CB500F rather than a 4 cylinder high rev bike. I will be using the bike mostly for commuting. What do you think?

I have some experience with riding a bike but I cannot tell that I have experience with danger avoidance etc since I always drive on the cautions side and I never go near any limits.
From the sounds of it, I would think you will do fine with the Hornet as a 2nd bike. You sound like you would have enough sense to keep things nice and easy, and after seven years of riding on the smaller bike, I feel you should have learned enough to avoid trouble.

The only caveat would be for you to remember that you're on a much different bike now, and there will be a learning curve. That being said, it should not take long to get used to and familiar with your new ride.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks .... I know it will be different but in what way? what should I expect?
Is it the acceleration or the handling?

and when comparing it with the cb500f what will be the main differences?
 

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Not certain on the differences between the CB500 and the Hornet, but the hornet will be physically larger and heavier, and therefor handle differently than you are used to, and the engine will have a good deal more power. With your level of experience, from what you have said, the Hornet should not be overwhelming.
 

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Did you already go buy the 600? If so, l would just go ride it the same way you have always ridden your other bike. The bike won't turn the throttle for you.

I test rode a 500 Ninja last Summer, and ultimately decided against it, mainly because it was physically too small...l am pretty tall...but also because, it just didn't want to GO. I ended up on an SV650 and that bike was a LOT of fun. So if you haven't bought your next bike, maybe you aren't fully convinced on what you want? The SV has a twin that is super responsive and a blast to ride, yet is not so crazy powerful that you feel like you are in danger if you want to open it up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hi hawkaholic37 ... thanks for your input. I didnt bought the 600 yet .... i tested one and i really liked it .. obviously i was very cautions cause it was my first time riding a bike bike and because it was not my bike. As as riding position etc I really liked it.
I am asking here because when some people say that there is a gap between a 125cc and a hornet, which in all fairness IMO the change will all in my control ... as you said "The bike won't turn the throttle for you".
 

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Get something that you will be satisfied with and will want to keep for a while, so that you don't end up doing the thing that most of us did, as in starting with something small (ME---50cc Honda 1962) and then 125's, 250's, 400's, 650's, 750's, open class UJM's and Sportbikes, Big touring bikes- etc-etc!

Although it may be safer to start small and unintimidating, most of us learn fast and seem to always want more power and speed. The Dealers are very happy to accommodate us and know that this size and power progression thing, will make them lots of money in the long run.

I'm 6ft-5in tall and 350 lbs of Corn fed, solid table muscle and if I went to a Dealer with no experience whatsoever, they'd love to put me on a 125cc Suzuki, single cylinder streetbike----knowing that I'd put maybe 500 miles on it and then realize the mistake I made and then trade it in at a terrible losss---and then buy a 250cc bike---and you guessed it, start the process all over again. SOOOOO, what I'm getting at, is if you can get a 600 series non-sportbike and take your time to learn it's characteristics, you'll be better off than getting something smaller in the first place.

My latest ride besides my 2012 Burgman 650 Executive scooter is my 2012 Triumph Rocket 3 Roadster, the largest displacement production bike made, with 150HP and 163 ft lbs of torque to the rear wheel and because of a well trained right wrist with a brain to match, I ride it no faster nor harder than I would a small streetbike. It's very easy to ride 50 mph to work instead of 150.

Good luck with your decision.

PS: We don't know if you are 16 years old and maybe 100 lbs and short, so it's a little hard to be specific with the advice. Will you be riding in Bejing, Los Angeles or in the middle of Kansas, where there are only Squirrels and Rabbits?? All of this makes a big difference.

Sam:coffeescreen:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
thanks Porky ... I think it all ends up on a well trained right wrist with a brain to match, which I think I qualify for this.

I am in my 30s, with 15,000km 'experience', weighing 67kg from italy and I will be riding in urban roads (no highways).
 

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You'll be fine my Friend, just be super careful and enjoy!
CHOW!

Sam:biggrin:
 

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If you are comfortable and proficient on the 125, it shouldn't be difficult to adapt to riding a larger motorcycle.

Keep in mind that it is most often the second, more powerful motorcycle, usually in the second or third year of riding that is involved in the largest number of crashes and fatalities. (This is from US studies.)

These are most likely from people becoming overconfident and not listening to their inner voice telling them they really shouldn't be riding so fast or so carelessly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
thanks to all ..... after considering both options and variables such as cost etc, I decided to go for the hornet since it is the bike that I was looking forward to get.

thanks and keep safe!
 
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