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Hey there,

Seeking advice, experiences & knowledge. Open to all feedback. Pls read, I am eager to know your thoughts.

Looking to upgrade my bike (Cb100n 1979) to a 12v so I can fit the best LED lighting possible. Had close call and know I need to be more visible to road traffic.

I’ve done some fairly extensive research already. Tho finding relevant information has been far/in between and often inconclusive on how to do this. Tho finally decided and purchased a 12v battery, 12v reg/rec, 12v LED bulbs, 12V LED suited flasher relay.
Also I will connect my yellow & white stator wires together overriding the output of alternator for better low rpm charging (happy to see how well it works before attempting more involved modification to the alternator coils)

***My question is regarding the alternator coil. I can see (I think) from my wire diagram that it is on the lighting circuit, soon to be 12v instead of 6v. I read that they can work for a while tho may heat up, burn out, being under the gas tank, I find this lil worrying aha.

Is it better and as simple to swap out the 6v stock coil for a new 12v ignition coil? Should I expect any negative effects, like pitting on the ignition timing points due to hire voltage?? Etc.

Or is wiring a small dc step down power converter a better or possibility, so the old stock ignition coil remains running on 6v. Would this even work, would I need to run a step up further down the circuit to meet the 12v earth ??

Or shall I quit worrying and run the 12v system and leave the 6v coil in? The few successful 12v conversation stories I’ve read, none mentioned changing the ignition coil. In fact one on a suzuki (different bike altogether I know) said the ignition coil ran separately to the battery lighting circuit therefore wouldn’t need changing. Is this in any way similar with Hondas? I am entirely new to this, tho my understanding of the below wire diagram tells me my ignition coil is on the same circuit.
64792


Much appreciated if you read this far! Cheers.
Regards,
Mark C.
 
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