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Discussion Starter #1
anyone with experience on both? carbs and fuel injection on motorcycles. I think carbs are great but have no experience with fuel injection.
 

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Swamp Rat Rider
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1,903 Posts
Only Time I prefer a Carb is because those I can fix .. :) Although both my Rides are EFI now ..
 

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Gone.
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17,857 Posts
Both have their advantages and disadvantages.

EFI is great for people that don't want to mess around with their bikes. Depending on what kind you have, once it's set up correctly it pretty much never has to be changed again unless you change something on the bike. A complete engine tune up on a modern EFI HD consists of changing the spark plugs and cleaning the air filter. Ten minutes. That's it. It's also good for those who do like really dialing in their bikes and have the specialized equipment and knowledge to do so.

Carburetors are generally easier to repair and tune, but can never be completely as efficient as an EFI system. (But often the differences in efficiency will not be noticed by the rider.) They are usually easier to tune and adjust without special equipment but again, with advanced equipment and skills you can get more out of them. Carburetors usually have slightly more fuel related problems than EFI bikes, especially the smaller carburetors. Plus, to me, carburetors are more fun. :)
 

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American Legion Rider
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23,521 Posts
As long as everything works EFI. But once needing repair carb. That's cause I can fix those. One of these days though absolutely everyone will wish they had a carb. If we ever get that perfect sun flare that takes out all electronic devices. Until then I like the simplicity of EFI from a user point of view.
 

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Charlie Tango Xray
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768 Posts
In the past, I prefered carbs because I was familiar with them, and I could easily tune them for conditions, (change jets etc, mostly on snowmobiles) But over the last fifteen years all my motorsport stuff has had fuel injection, and I don't think I'll ever go back to carbs again..... Other than my vintage stuff.
 

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Premium Member
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8,908 Posts
Carbs

I own 10 carburetors on bikes that are running, and need four more to get the spare fired up.

The scariest thing these days, are bikes with more than 120 hp and EFI.
The dumb things run when you press the button.

My SV1000S is fuel injected. To tune it and make a few changes, it was run on the dyno, with analysers and electronic thingies connected. That costs, but it is a one shot deal, and the info is stored. If for instance I change the pipes and mufflers, we have the base map. Probably cost $100- to get it re-tuned for the change, but worth it IMO. I am not sure how long the injectors last before they need servicing. But on my diesel engines I do it about every ten years, or if it puffs black smoke.

Unkle Krusty*
 

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1,133 Posts
OK frankly, the two cannot compare.
They are not interchangable and if you have problems with either one you have to be a rocket scientist to fix them.
Where electronics come in, you will always have that kid with the pocket protector that tells you that if you change this cap or that resistor that you can increase the gas milage and get better performance... well, in my day, caps you wore on your head, and resistors were what you call spark plugs.
 

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Ace Tuner
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A good thing about F I bikes is they can sit up MUCH longer than a carbureted machine.
It takes a lot longer for the injectors plug with bad/old fuel as opposed to the time it takes for a carb to go south.

Also, with the purchase of add on electrics you can re-map an F I system on your computer to match performance mods.

One advantage a carb has is it seems easier (for me) to fine tune for the smoothest running on idle.
Another advantage I have is customers get pay me to clean their carburetors when they let em sit up too long. Not so much with F I machines.
 

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Last year I had two different sport bikes, one of each. One was a 2004 Suzuki SV650 (EFI) and the other was a 1987 Yamaha FJ1200 (carb). The difference in the way they rode were night and day.

The Yamaha clearly had more power, but wasn't nearly as responsive. Once it got revving, the power was abundant, but it took longer to get there. The SV, on the other hand, was instant...it wanted to go now! It was quick and responsive, immediate.
 

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Gone
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Last year I had two different sport bikes, one of each. One was a 2004 Suzuki SV650 (EFI) and the other was a 1987 Yamaha FJ1200 (carb). The difference in the way they rode were night and day.

The Yamaha clearly had more power, but wasn't nearly as responsive. Once it got revving, the power was abundant, but it took longer to get there. The SV, on the other hand, was instant...it wanted to go now! It was quick and responsive, immediate.
The biggest difference in how those two engines make power is that one is a Vtwin and the other an inline 4.
 

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I'm sorry my bike has a carburetor attached to it. On those cold days fuel injection would make it so much easier to start the bike than having to pull the choke wide open and wait and wait after for the bike to warm up before I pull out.
 
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