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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Ok,I am a cheapskate and if I can make a free repair to something,i will. Sometimes you might encounter those old brass honda floats that may have leaked a bit and now have gas inside them. Here is how to remove it.
First,if you shake the float,you may hear a sloshing sound ,or what you hear could be a little piece of solder inside the float. I cannot hear too well from a lifetime of using tools,so a leak test is in order. Run some hot tap water into a disposable container and immerse the float. Bubbles will appear at the sight of the leak, so mark those sites with a permanent marker.

Now you need to remove the fluid which is probably a mixture of water and gas. With the leak facing down, add a little heat [low setting] from a hair dryer to the float.The heat will warm the air inside the float chamber enough to push out the fluid inside and it will weep out the leak site. Quit applying heat when the float starts feeling rather warm to the touch,and then let the float cool down. A damp cool cloth may help out here, but is not necessary. As the float cools,air will be drawn inside to equalize the pressure. Reheat the air and more fluid will be expelled and keep repeating until the float is completely dry inside.

Once you are sure the floats are cleaned out, it is time to seal them. Since I have a perforated tank that also requires repair,I am using tank sealer from Northern industries. The sealer is 33.00 a quart and probably not worth buying for float repair unless you also have a gas tank that needs to be sealed. One float is about 30.00 shipped and two floats would be 45.00 shipped.

Slum.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Ok,I will let you know. I am presently using electrolysis on the tank in question to minimize any removal of good metal. However,the gray sludge left behind slows the process and it will probably take some agitation with abrasive to remove it and then more electro treatment to get the tank down to pure steel and no rust. Because the tank will not hold water for the eloctro,I am submerging it in the washing soda solution. i have been at it for a week and the cool thing about it is that even on bare metal,there is no rusting at all on the bright metal on sanded areas of the tank. When I finish learning the process or suffer defeat,i will share my experience with you guys

I was going to use RedKote on the tank,but the Northern was highly recommended by the local motorcycle shop.

BTW,i will probably order new floats for the bike when I get a big enough order to share the freight charge as 14.00 a float is certainly reasonable if the floats are still available as new parts.
 

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Definitely put up a post when you get done with the tank. I'd be interested in seeing how your processes work out.

I stopped even trying to de-rust any tanks myself and just take them to a local radiator shop that does a lot of tanks also. It costs the bike owner more but I just don't have the time or patience to spend on one tank. (If it was for my bike I likely would though, as I'm a cheap skate too.)
 
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