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I'm 16- just getting started in the whole motorcycle scene. I've signed up for my Rider's Edge class in late July and I'm really excited for that. I've been to the dealership and definently crossed out 250cc bikes. I'm curious about the 500 and 600s though. I'll get to try out a 500 at Rider's Edge, but what do you think about a new rider having a 600? Responsibilty definently comes first on those, and Craigslist sure has a lot of them!

Please feel free to give me some input!
 

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You're not just getting started in the motorcycle scene, you're getting started in the whole driving on the street scene!

How do your parents feel about you and motorcycles?

I'm going to assume that you're interested in sport bikes? Why have you crossed off 250s?

I feel the need to clarify something at first that most people, myself included, didn't realize when looking at sport bikes for the first time. Engine size, (cc) isn't everything, you have to take into account whether the bike has, (typically) 2 or 4 cylinders. 2 cylinder bikes are usually 250, 500, 650ccs, and 4 cylinder bikes are 600, 750, 1000+.

4 cylinder bikes like the CBR600s, R6s, GSX-R600s you're looking at are developed, manufactured and tuned with professional riders in mind. These are not geared towards beginners and you'd be very hard-pressed to find a level headed person suggest a brand new, 16 year old rider go buy a 4-cyl super sport as his first motorcycle.

I have a Ninja 250r, I've had it for about 4,000 miles now and I haven't "outgrown" it, which is a lot of new rider's "worry." Trust me, you have much more to concern yourself with than how quickly you'll tire of your first bike.

Starting small lets you learn on a more forgiving bike. It lets you soak up more of the riding experience without having to worry about spiking the throttle in a panic and having the bike shoot out from under you. Starting small is the best way to go, and you honestly can upgrade later when you are ready.

Also, while you get a feeling for the seating position etc at the riders edge course, you don't go over 15ish mph, so you don't get any idea of how the bikes really are at speed, or what kind of power they have or don't have.
 

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BTW, the 500cc bikes they use in the Rider's Edge course are single cylinder Buell Blasts that make about the same power as a Ninja 250, if not less. They are nothing like your typical 500cc bike.

I am looking for a first bike as well, and while I wanted a CBR600RR like my friend has, I realized that is death waiting to happen with no motorcycle experience.

Before I started reading this forum I had no idea what the hell I was getting into. I would recommend reading a TON on here because there is a lot of information to be learned. I have been using this advice in my car to make myself a better driver and to prepare myself for the bike when it comes.

I'm also glad I've been driving a few years and have learned to read the road and traffic before I even think of getting on a bike. I think that will make me a safer rider too, since I won't be taking on the whole road experience at once, just the motorcycle.

Long story short, I'm glad I didn't jump on a 600cc sportbike at 16, I would have killed myself. At 21 with a few years driving under my belt and a better head on my shoulders, I think I'm now ready to take on riding. I'm getting my permit in a couple weeks and then taking the MSF course, and won't even start really looking at bikes until after that.
 

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+1 to everything mapolley07 said

Except, you can start looking at bikes whenever you want, that's half the fun! I was at dealerships every other weekend just checking stuff out, months before I even had my license. I didn't actually buy my bike until after I took the MSF course and got licensed, but it can take some time to find the right bike at the right price, so don't put off the purchase if you don't have to!
 

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Well, I have been looking at bikes, but I meant seriously trying to decide on a bike. I've hit up the dealerships and looked at bikes and asked for advice and what not, but until I have a little experience, I don't want to look too much and get dead set on a bike that's not right for me.

btw, porange, what part of cincy are you in? I live in Fairfield, and would like to have some people to ride with and learn from when I do get my bike
 

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Oh cool another rider in Cincinnasty! :tongue:

I live down in Deerpark/Kenwood area... You've got some better roads up in your part of town though! When are you taking your course, are you going through Great Oaks?
 

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Not sure yet, I'm going to take the one that is sponsored by the DMV, because its only $25!! I haven't scheduled yet, as I haven't started getting paychecks from my summer job, so I'm a bit broke as of yet. I'll hopefully be taking the course soon, but if i can't schedule it before I get a bike, I'll probably start riding it around the neighborhood a little bit to get the feel of it until I can take the course
 

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Ooh boy, yeah the one for $25 is the one through Great Oaks.. They fill up several weeks in advance so I'd start looking now just to get it squared away. That's the course I took, nice instructors!
 

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+1 to everything mapolley07 said

Except, you can start looking at bikes whenever you want, that's half the fun! I was at dealerships every other weekend just checking stuff out, months before I even had my license. I didn't actually buy my bike until after I took the MSF course and got licensed, but it can take some time to find the right bike at the right price, so don't put off the purchase if you don't have to!
I'm still at the dealership every other weekend. :p

Tire kicking is both fun and depressing at the same time.
 

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Austin, my advice is to get/borrow yourself a dirt or dual-sport motorcycle and learn with it.
Do take the course as soon as you are able.

As was posted earlier, it is best to learn to drive in traffic in a cage first. :thumbsup:
MUCH safer.

Eric
 

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I need to put that on my list as well,going to dealerships,etc.

For the last few months i have been looking on prices of bikes on ebay,craigslist but it wont hurt to check in person as well.

Ive been doing so much research online and in these forums so by the time i have the money maybe by fall Sept,October, i can be ready to buy and ride.

Im enjoying learning more day by day but dam i just want it now sometimes lol
 

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Is anyone else against a 16 year old getting on a motorcycle? Dirt bike sure, but riding on the highway is truly a do or die situation especially for someone new to driving. My parents fought me for getting back into riding and I'm 38 years old! By the way get a used bike. Buying a new bike while just starting out will lead to heartbreak when your shiny new motorcycle makes contact with asphalt.
 

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I agree. No shinny NEW bike and stay off of the highway until you have been driving for at least a year in a cage!
I put 22,000 street miles on my CB350 before I ever needed/felt the need to venture onto a highway.
I have NEVER wrecked a street bike ever in over 35 years of riding...
Dirt bikes... of course! :wink:

Eric
 

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I'm about your age and just took my MSF course. At my class we had a choice between a Rebel 250 and a Nighthawk 250 (same bike, different seating). If you haven't ridden a bike other than a dirtbike ( where you can go as fast as you please) you'll notice that a 250cc is plenty to start on.
Most people our age that get into bikes thing that they wont be stupid and ease on with the bike until they get used to it but the truth is...you wont want too! Do yourself a favor and take the MSF course, try the bikes and if you still feel you need a bike bigger than a 250, get something like a DR400 or an EX500 Ninja, which I'll be looking for myself unless i decide that I'd rather get a 250 Ninja and do the ZX7 rear suspension swap.
 

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Let me give you some advice.

1. Dont listen to a thing the stealership dealer tells you. They are there to sell the most expensive bike they can, and to make lots of money, NOT to make sure you are safe or make good choices. If you want advice regarding which bike to buy, ask other bikers....not some choad that works on commission.

2. A 600cc inline 4 is NOT a beginners bike, in ANY case. A inline 4 600 bike has more power in 1st gear than the ninja 250does in nearly its entire gear range. That might sound fun and exciting, but its way more than any beginner can handle properly.

You need to spend time on a "forgiving" motorcycle before tackling a EXPERT ONLY bike like a inline 4 600. There are motorcycling basics that you simply must learn before you can ride safely. These basics that you learn on a smaller displacement bike will keep you from killing yourself later.

Riding a motorcycle is much more than just twisting the throttle. There is braking technique, weight transfer management, throttle management, body positioning, countersteering, shifting, rev-matching, downshifting, engine braking, etc. All things that are much safer and easier to learn on something that wont toss you off with the slightest mistake.

If you make a mistake on a 250R, most of the time you will get away with it, with just a change of underwear.

If you make even the tiniest of mistakes on a 600, you will likely end up on the pavement. There is no forgiveness with these bikes. They dont suffer fools, or tolerate incompetency. You had better know what you are doing 100% of the time with these bikes, and you dont as a beginner.

Do yourself a huge favor, and start on a Ninja 250R. And stay on it until you have at least 6k miles on it before you even think about upgrading.

New pilots dont learn how to fly in F-16's, New racers dont learn how to race in F1 cars, and new motorcyclists shouldnt learn on 600cc inline 4s
 

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At 16, you're new to the entire driving scen, not just the motorcycle scene. Personally, I would wait awhile, learn how to drive a car before a bike. I don't just mean learn how to physically handle the car but also, you need to learn the rules of the road, threat analysis, get used to dumbass drivers. Also, I cant imagine insurance being anything less than astronomical for you being that you're only 16. But if you do decide that you need a bike right now, I'll repeat everything that everyone else said. Forget anything with 4 cylinders. This means no 600, 750, or 1000+. A 250 or 500 will do what you need it to do and plenty more. Trust me, I started on a 250 and I'm still faster than most cars on the road, and I'm a bigger dude.
 
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