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Discussion Starter #1
So my fuel filter on my 98' Kawasaki Vulcan was slightly dripping- I thought no problem, just needs to be readjusted and tightened. As it turns out I made a few too many turns and overtightened it and the glass cracked :mad:

Now I found the part on Kawasaki's website, but I was supposed to go out on a long cruise with a friend tomorrow, so I really need a new fuel filter ASAP. I figure that the average automotive dealer doesn't carry motorcycle fuel filters but they do carry car fuel filters, if it's the same size, could I just use a car fuel filter on my bike?

Thanks in advance:71baldboy:
 

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Save them all!
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Yes, if the fuel lines attach safely and the filter physically fits in the bike it will get you through. OEM is best, but honestly I run mostly Generic FLAPS filters in all my bikes. It will get you though.
 

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Okay, thanks! Yes I think I am going to order the OEM and put the temporary one on as backup once the OEM comes in. Hopefully I can find a matching one at Pepboys or Advanced Auto Parts
 

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Something that just crossed my mind- could you possibly run a motorcycle without a fuel filter? What would happen if it ran from the petcock to the carb? Would you just get bad fuel mileage? Would it gunk up the carb?
 

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Gone.
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Ron's very accurate, but succinct, answer just brought a smile to my mug.:biggrin:

Fuel filters are good for catching rust specks and larger pieces of trash. They won't purify bad gas and won't strain out enough water and other slime to keep your carburetors from getting gunked up if your tank is nasty and you have crappy gas in it.
 

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Aging & Worn
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speaking of filters.........(I know, I know.....a "fuel" filter)......

What's up with those air filters that look like this:



Is it just "the look" or is there something uniquely functional about them?

-Soupy
 

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Many if not most motorcycles don't use a filter. Most do have some sort of screen in the tank to stop larger particles from getting into the fuel system.

A concern with a fuel filter is that it allows enough fuel flow through it for the engine to operate properly.

Cars (and some motorcycles) use a pressurized fuel system, while many motorcycles use a gravity-fed system. If your motorcycle has a fuel pump, an auto filter may work fine. If not, I might use a small engine filter such as one for a riding mower.

Either may work of course, but choosing type closest to stock will probably be the wisest choice.
 

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speaking of filters.........(I know, I know.....a "fuel" filter)......

What's up with those air filters that look like this:



Is it just "the look" or is there something uniquely functional about them?

-Soupy
Those are high-flow filters that allow more air into the mixture. Using one may require that the fuel mixture is adjusted to work properly, especially combined with an aftermarket exhaust.
 

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^^^:thumbsup:

In addition, the particular ones you're showing there have a stand-off which is a sort of "cold air" intake. That gets the intake away from the engine so theoretically it draws in colder, denser air that will have more O2 in it per unit of volume.
 

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Pale Rider
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Soupy, these filters use a cotton filtration material, soaked in a very sticky oil. They are similar to foam filters more commonly used on dirt bikes, which to me, speaks volumes about their effectiveness at filtering crud particles. They are around $50 for a bike model's air filter, if they make one for your bike... Otherwise, you can custom-make one using Uni filter foam, and just apply the same type of oil. Make sure the media seals properly, though, especially around the seams.

I had a K&N filter in my '79 Honda 750. It seemed to open the lungs up a bit, according my laser-accurate butt dyno, but no discernable improvement in mileage. I also replaced the falling-apart OEM foam filter media in my '83 KZ440LTD, using the Uni foam media, and the K&N oil (see below). Worked beautifully.

The other thing about the K&N filters, is that they are re-usable: clean them every 50,000 miles of roadway usage, re-apply the sticky oil, and put them back into service. The K&N brand claim a lifespan of 1,000,000 miles -- seriously, that is their claim. Servicing them requires a special kit with cleaning spray to dissolve, and remove, the old oil and captured crud, along with an aerosol can of sticky oil to apply to the dried, cleaned, media. These kits work well on Uni foam filter media, as well.

:coffee:Cheers!
 

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Swamp Rat Rider
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+1 on the K&N filters!

(Except the ones for Harley's should be cleaned at every oil change, or 5,000 miles.)
What I did with all the HD's owned .. With the Victory can go 10,000 Miles even though The Vic Manual says 15K .. It's sits under the Gas Tank so it's not as exposed as the Harley Filters .. I use what's known as Stage 1 Lloyds Filter but chances are K&N actually makes it, as is the Same Principal and I clean and oil with the K&N Stuff .. Not too concerned about the Scout yet probably will change it at 10K as well as it also sits under the tank .. Not worried about adding extra air at this time until find a tuner to richen it up a bit first ..
 

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American Legion Rider
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Oh? Are you getting curious to see if it will hit what that speedometer indicates?:D I don't think you'll really want to. Although I'm think about what the Chieftain has. I haven't seen a Scout yet but figure they must be optimistic with them too.


EDIT: Yes I have seen a Scout speedo. On your other thread here about them.
 
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