Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Im 15 and I have always been interested in motorcycles. I have had some prior experience on a motorcycle. I do understand that motorcycles are more dangerous than a car would be, but also if i was cautious, alot of good could come out of owning a bike. So would it be a good idea for a 16 y/o to get a bike for their first vehicle?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
388 Posts
Yes but you have to respect the danger. My daughter got her first bike when she was 15 a Virago 250 then at 16 stepped up to a Sportster, she's 17 now and rides a Victory Vegas. Do you have an experienced rider you can ride with?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Umm unfortunately no I don't, but I do have experienced grandparents that are just a phone call away but I wouldn't ever be able actually ride with them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,140 Posts
Sure your 1st vehicle can be a bike why not? Where do you live & what type of riding will you do? City or country riding? Is winter a problem?

Please start with a SMALL bike, 300cc or less, and preferably a used bike to learn on. Get a bigger/newer bike once you have some miles under your belt :) and by all means sign up for a local BRC (basic riders course). They supply the bike, so it is also a great way to see how you like & fit on the bikes in their course.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,003 Posts
As long as you are willing to accept the risks involved, and have the ability to use good judgement I don't see why not. I strongly suggest taking the Basic Riders Course that's offered in many states. The learning experience will be well worth it. It's not necessarily the riders fault for accidents, but the others around on the roadway play a big big part in our safety. It sounds like your grandparents are riders. Pick up that phone. Listen to what they have to say, you may get some slack from them, but if they offer advise, listen to it and heed it. Not only can you learn something from them, they will be happy to be involved.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
My suggestion would be a dirt bike, and ride it in the dirt a lot until you get real good at racing it around. My experience in the dirt has saved my life on the road many times, and it is experience that a lot of road riders never get. When you are old enough you will also be experienced enough to avoid a lot of the bad mistakes that people make that get them killed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Yes I would be doing a lot of country riding and snow would definetly not be a problem. I would just be riding around my small town to school and maybe a 15 mile trip to " the big city"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Yes I would just being riding around my small town to and from school and maybe a trip to " the big city". And winter would never be problem for where I live
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
And I live in texas where it is required to take the msf course in order to get a class M license
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,342 Posts
I got my first bike at 15, my permit at 15 1/2. My first bike was a Honda 90, and that is too small. The safety course is a must even if it wasn't required. Also get good gear and don't scrimp on the helmet.
 

·
Gone.
Joined
·
17,873 Posts
I got my first street legal bike at 15 too. But I had to wait until I was 16 to ride it on the street. (Other then short runs down the block when no one was looking.) I had dirt bikes before that.

Just ride and act like you have some sense and you'll probably be okay.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,162 Posts
Add to all of this good advice that you are getting:

Gear--At the minimum,you need high top leather shoes, Never wear shorts,and wear a full face helmet-no exceptions. My full face saved my teeth in a less than 10MPH down in a corner,and yes,I was just riding around town. Broke my thumb,however.

At your age,your buddies will want to ride your bike. No way,as it might expose your parents to a huge lawsuit.

Also,you should earn every penny for the bike,insurance,and gas for it.

Funny that you do not mention what your parents think of all of this??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,169 Posts
Not funny Slumlord. It might tell us why he is asking here instead of at home.
A bike has advantages and disadvantages at 16 years old. A disadvantage I see at that age is dating. The girls may like the bike but how will their parents feel about it? A small bike can definitely be a small cost saver over a car but not as much as you might think. A large bike like I ride costs more to own than a car. Things like tires come up far more often on a bike and tend to cost more than car tires. At 16 you are going to pay tons of money for insurance on any vehicle and having a bike over a car will not help that situation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
I wouldn't allow my child to ride a bike as a daily driver at 16 unless they've grown up around and on dirt bikes or the like.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
388 Posts
I wouldn't allow my child to ride a bike as a daily driver at 16 unless they've grown up around and on dirt bikes or the like.
That's sound advice especially if you don't have an experienced rider to ride with.

Here's the bike my daughter got when she was 15. 1990 Virago 250 paid $800 for it then sold it for $800 when she was ready for another bike.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,169 Posts
.
I wouldn't allow my child to ride a bike as a daily driver at 16 unless they've grown up around and on dirt bikes or the like.
My question is why not. We have all been parents, so does our own prejudices influence anything? My answer is not only no but he!l no. Our kids have a mind of their own. Where does that leave you as a parent? It leaves you in a place that I have had to deal with. Admit to yourself that you cannot prevent them from riding or doing the wrong thing on a bike. That is reality. Where to next? Well, start by admitting that you cannot control their actions, no matter how hard that is to swallow. All that leaves you as a parent is the possibility of helping them make the right decisions. In that area you can be very influential. Your kids know full well that you care about them and if you truly evaluate their situation as an independent person might, not as their parent, and present them with a decent course of action they will probably accept it. In my mind that is a winning position to take.
Good luck to all of you. Being a parent is never really easy.
 

·
Roamer
Joined
·
176 Posts
I had a moped when I was 15 that I ran around the countryside with. It took forever to get anywhere as top speed was 35mph downhill with a tailwind. :biggrin: It was way cheaper than a car though and I was able to get around without a license (only 50cc). But after I got my license I did sell it and the dirt bike to put toward a car because I needed something to go to work, college, etc. in all weather.

Anyway, I'm not a parent and never want to be, but I think, since it sounds like you live in a rural area, as long as can you afford the insurance and maintenance, riding a motorcycle (with proper gear and common sense) wouldn't be anymore dangerous than bombing down the back roads with car full of your friends and not paying attention. If you're going to do something stupid, you'll do it no matter what kind of vehicle your in. I would suggest no passengers though, at least until you're really ready to take responsibility for another person's life. Of course, I would suggest the same about a car, too.

You should consider all the possible conditions under which you might be riding -- rain, sleet, hail, snow, hot sun, humid, freezing, nighttime. Will you need to haul cargo? Think about what you might need to carry. Are you punctual? If you are always running late, being in a hurry on a bike is a bad idea. You'll have to change that about yourself or just be late.

A car is more versatile in those regards, but I know people who only own a motorcycle and do fine. Though they always call when they need to buy something big at the store... :p

You could also sell the bike and get a car later if the need arises. Just my 2 cents...which probably isn't worth half that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,169 Posts
Are we all going to wimp out? This guy has a real concern and I, for one, really want to help. A new rider with concerns is a unique situation that calls for mature real world recommendations, at least as I see it. Please step in with any help you can give.
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top