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Discussion Starter #1
Alright, so I'm looking to get my first motorcycle soon with my income tax, but there's a lot of choices and I dont have many people I can turn to for suggestions.

I know I want either a cruiser or a touring bike. Sport bikes dont do it for me. I plan on using it for a few interstate road trips as well once I get used to it (I dont plan on going all out on the interstate right after I get it, lol) And my price limit is set at about $7500 or so

Any recommendations?
 

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What's your height/weight and riding skill level history? Are you going to ride with a passenger often?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
6' tall, 150 lbs, I doubt I'll be riding with a passenger for more than a few miles at a time. Like giving people rides home and whatnot once I'm able.

I only have a few miles of experience however. Forget what kind of bike my friend let me ride
 

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For a cruiser and it being your first bike, I wouldn't go any more than a 650 - 700 cc. I started on a 96 suzuki savage. You really want to learn on an entry level bike. They are more forgiving to rookie mistakes than the bigger bikes are. You'll gain more experience and will be able to handle the bigger bikes once you have a season or two under your belt.

I would suggest no passengers for the first season or two. You need to learn the bike yourself first. Need to concentrate on protecting your own life first before you take on the responsibility of someone elses life. Riding 2up takes skill and practice as it effects the way the bike operates.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Definitely. I always try to err on the side of caution with more dangerous things.

Is there any bikes specifically that you would recommend for my price range?
 

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I brought my Boulevard S40 for 6000. Harley has the new Street 500 for 6700. But you may be best buying used, which could open up the possibilities for you.
 

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Not to highjack your thread.....

My wife and I are both beginners, with no riding experience. We were looking at a Honda Shadow 650 for her and a Yamaha 650 V Star for me I'm 6' 2" 250, the wife a mere 5'4. Harley Davidson approved us for a sporster 883 but it doesn't look to be that comfortable and I'm not sure I want a HD for a first bike any thoughts? Sorry for the highjack
 

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Yep buying a used "1st bike" is a very smart move. Get a good deal on an older bike in good shape, ride it for a year or two, then sell it. Sometimes for nearly the same price you bought it for if you've been careful with it. Even if you lose a few $100 on the sale difference consider that to be VERY cheap rent!

Also sign up for a rider training course right away if you're new to street riding! They provide the bike for the course, so not only you learn how to ride you also get some seat time on a smaller bike & will give you some idea what size bike to buy after completing the course.
 

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Definitely take the Basic Rider Course.
A smaller bike is a better idea for the reasons above.
Also, go out to dealers and sit on everything so you can find the one that feels right when you're on it.
 

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I don't think you're ready to buy a bike yet, even if you have $ in hand. You don't even know if you LIKE to ride yet, or just like the IDEA of riding.

You need to start by BOTH completing the MSF class.

The FASTEST way to learn is to start on smaller displacement bikes and move up. Plan 3 years...

After class, pick up a USED 250 dual sport, or even a medium-sized SCOOTER is probably your next step. Or both. Use it for errands, run around town, do a few trails, see if you actually USE it. Buy helmets, gloves, etc. Go to "bike nite" There's no crime in learning to ride on a scooter, they're fun!

I used to go to MC club rides on my 250 Scooter. Nobody cared, I could keep up, and I learned how to safely ride in a group. I eventually began leading rides!

You've got a much better chance of your wife sticking with you if you allow her to start out on a scooter rather than a MC. women aren't nearly as afraid to admit how fun scooters really are! If she really wants to shift, consider a Honda 250 Rebel, the ultimate beginner's bike.

On low powered bikes/scooters you'll learn the 99 ways drivers will try to kill you at a much lower speed. Better chance of stopping!

From there you might consider a 450 or 600 upright like a Honda Shadow, etc.

My experience is you can't tell if a MC is comfortable by sitting on it in the showroom. You need a LONG test drive to determine if the riding position "works" for you. I've bought at least 3 bikes I quickly resold after figuring out they didn't "fit."

Stop and talk to every MC rider you see. Your riding buddies are the ones who'll help you determine the RIGHT bike for you. Ride every bike you get the chance to. Just ask, "Hey, can I ride that?" All they can say is "No."

After a YEAR, then you might want to look at getting a 450 or 600 upright bike to ride awhile, get used to the speeds it can do highways, etc. Start collecting gear --- boots, helmets, leather, rain gear, etc.

You may find, like me, you're a fair weather rider. Or you may prefer off-road where cagers aren't trying to kill you. Or you may indeed find you like touring and want to move up.

But starting out on a big bike. No way. You'll learn a LOT faster if you move up from small to medium to big bikes.

I would trade every moment I spent on my Ninja900 and Honda Sabre for time on a 300 Ninja where I would have learned to ride a lot better!

Nowadays I ride a ginormous KAwasaki Concours 1400..... AND a scooter!

A big bike simply isn't any fun if you haven't mastered the skills you need to enjoy it. That includes parking lot skills, U-turns, moving it, backing up, which are a LOT easier to learn with a smaller bike.

Anybody can ride a big bike in a straight line out on the highway. It's handling the "situations" that requires the skills you gain coming up through the ranks of smaller bikes.
 

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I don't think you're ready to buy a bike yet, even if you have $ in hand. You don't even know if you LIKE to ride yet, or just like the IDEA of riding.

You need to start by BOTH completing the MSF class.

The FASTEST way to learn is to start on smaller displacement bikes and move up. Plan 3 years...

After class, pick up a USED 250 dual sport, or even a medium-sized SCOOTER is probably your next step. Or both. Use it for errands, run around town, do a few trails, see if you actually USE it. Buy helmets, gloves, etc. Go to "bike nite" There's no crime in learning to ride on a scooter, they're fun!

I used to go to MC club rides on my 250 Scooter. Nobody cared, I could keep up, and I learned how to safely ride in a group. I eventually began leading rides!

You've got a much better chance of your wife sticking with you if you allow her to start out on a scooter rather than a MC. women aren't nearly as afraid to admit how fun scooters really are! If she really wants to shift, consider a Honda 250 Rebel, the ultimate beginner's bike.

On low powered bikes/scooters you'll learn the 99 ways drivers will try to kill you at a much lower speed. Better chance of stopping!

From there you might consider a 450 or 600 upright like a Honda Shadow, etc.

My experience is you can't tell if a MC is comfortable by sitting on it in the showroom. You need a LONG test drive to determine if the riding position "works" for you. I've bought at least 3 bikes I quickly resold after figuring out they didn't "fit."

Stop and talk to every MC rider you see. Your riding buddies are the ones who'll help you determine the RIGHT bike for you. Ride every bike you get the chance to. Just ask, "Hey, can I ride that?" All they can say is "No."

After a YEAR, then you might want to look at getting a 450 or 600 upright bike to ride awhile, get used to the speeds it can do highways, etc. Start collecting gear --- boots, helmets, leather, rain gear, etc.

You may find, like me, you're a fair weather rider. Or you may prefer off-road where cagers aren't trying to kill you. Or you may indeed find you like touring and want to move up.

But starting out on a big bike. No way. You'll learn a LOT faster if you move up from small to medium to big bikes.

I would trade every moment I spent on my Ninja900 and Honda Sabre for time on a 300 Ninja where I would have learned to ride a lot better!

Nowadays I ride a ginormous KAwasaki Concours 1400..... AND a scooter!

A big bike simply isn't any fun if you haven't mastered the skills you need to enjoy it. That includes parking lot skills, U-turns, moving it, backing up, which are a LOT easier to learn with a smaller bike.

Anybody can ride a big bike in a straight line out on the highway. It's handling the "situations" that requires the skills you gain coming up through the ranks of smaller bikes.
:confused:, too much
 

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I don't think you're ready to buy a bike yet, even if you have $ in hand. You don't even know if you LIKE to ride yet, or just like the IDEA of riding.

You need to start by BOTH completing the MSF class.

The FASTEST way to learn is to start on smaller displacement bikes and move up. Plan 3 years...

After class, pick up a USED 250 dual sport, or even a medium-sized SCOOTER is probably your next step. Or both. Use it for errands, run around town, do a few trails, see if you actually USE it. Buy helmets, gloves, etc. Go to "bike nite" There's no crime in learning to ride on a scooter, they're fun!

I used to go to MC club rides on my 250 Scooter. Nobody cared, I could keep up, and I learned how to safely ride in a group. I eventually began leading rides!

You've got a much better chance of your wife sticking with you if you allow her to start out on a scooter rather than a MC. women aren't nearly as afraid to admit how fun scooters really are! If she really wants to shift, consider a Honda 250 Rebel, the ultimate beginner's bike.

On low powered bikes/scooters you'll learn the 99 ways drivers will try to kill you at a much lower speed. Better chance of stopping!

From there you might consider a 450 or 600 upright like a Honda Shadow, etc.

My experience is you can't tell if a MC is comfortable by sitting on it in the showroom. You need a LONG test drive to determine if the riding position "works" for you. I've bought at least 3 bikes I quickly resold after figuring out they didn't "fit."

Stop and talk to every MC rider you see. Your riding buddies are the ones who'll help you determine the RIGHT bike for you. Ride every bike you get the chance to. Just ask, "Hey, can I ride that?" All they can say is "No."

After a YEAR, then you might want to look at getting a 450 or 600 upright bike to ride awhile, get used to the speeds it can do highways, etc. Start collecting gear --- boots, helmets, leather, rain gear, etc.

You may find, like me, you're a fair weather rider. Or you may prefer off-road where cagers aren't trying to kill you. Or you may indeed find you like touring and want to move up.

But starting out on a big bike. No way. You'll learn a LOT faster if you move up from small to medium to big bikes.

I would trade every moment I spent on my Ninja900 and Honda Sabre for time on a 300 Ninja where I would have learned to ride a lot better!

Nowadays I ride a ginormous KAwasaki Concours 1400..... AND a scooter!

A big bike simply isn't any fun if you haven't mastered the skills you need to enjoy it. That includes parking lot skills, U-turns, moving it, backing up, which are a LOT easier to learn with a smaller bike.

Anybody can ride a big bike in a straight line out on the highway. It's handling the "situations" that requires the skills you gain coming up through the ranks of smaller bikes.
What he said ^^^^. I think every new rider should read this post :)
 

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I don't think you're ready to buy a bike yet, even if you have $ in hand. You don't even know if you LIKE to ride yet, or just like the IDEA of riding.

You need to start by BOTH completing the MSF class.

You've got a much better chance of your wife sticking with you if you allow her to start out on a scooter rather than a MC. women aren't nearly as afraid to admit how fun scooters really are! If she really wants to shift, consider a Honda 250 Rebel, the ultimate beginner's bike.

On low powered bikes/scooters you'll learn the 99 ways drivers will try to kill you at a much lower speed. Better chance of stopping!

You may find, like me, you're a fair weather rider. Or you may prefer off-road where cagers aren't trying to kill you. Or you may indeed find you like touring and want to move up.

But starting out on a big bike. No way. You'll learn a LOT faster if you move up from small to medium to big bikes.

A big bike simply isn't any fun if you haven't mastered the skills you need to enjoy it. That includes parking lot skills, U-turns, moving it, backing up, which are a LOT easier to learn with a smaller bike.

Anybody can ride a big bike in a straight line out on the highway. It's handling the "situations" that requires the skills you gain coming up through the ranks of smaller bikes.
I'm not sure how comfortable I feel agreeing with Wade but he makes a few good points here. Until you have ridden you have no idea if it is for you. If you don't believe that go look at the used bikes in your nearby large dealership and see how many bikes are several years old but have very low miles on them. Those belonged to people who just liked the idea of riding.
I can't agree with relegating women to riding scooters. That is just wrong. Many women can outride their significant others.
As he suggested, smaller bikes are more forgiving so they make better starter bikes. As soon as you get really comfortable on a small bike it is time to start looking for your dream bike. Going from a 350cc or so bike to a 1731cc one like I ride is no big deal once you have mastered your riding skills. I see no reason to make multiple stops along the way if that next bike feels right during your test ride on it.
Do not do any changes without a test ride. The paper specs on a bike will give you no feel at all how a bike will handle or feel on the road. Until you have ridden a bike you are totally clueless about that bike except maybe in terms of things like torque or horsepower, both of which are meaningless when you are out in the real world.
Again I am torn agreeing with Wade but straight lines are nothing, any noob can ride in a straight line at 90 MPH but they can't stop very well and may lose control on a 10 MPH corner.
 

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Ya I don't agree with the wife having to start off on a scooter and not the male. That's just bull. If my husband told me I had to start of on a scooter, the bike would be in the bedroom and he'd be in the driveway. Just because we are women doesn't mean we can't handle a bike. I started off on a 650, and even though I dropped it once at low speed, it didn't discourage me for more than 15 minutes to try again. Glad I did, cause I'm really getting the hang of riding now.
 

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Well put Zippy. Yes I am the ultimate "feminist". If you can keep up with me you are my equal and if you can do better than me you are my superior. It is that simple and it is all about skill for me. You bet I know when I have been beat. Many women are better riders than I am. I think that is awesome and I try like crazy to catch up with their skill level.
 

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I don't think Wadenelson meant it as a bigoted remark. Maybe he didn't word it properly, but l didn't take it that way. I actually took he was suggesting that women are more open to the idea of starting slow and working their way into it, and that what you ride isn't so important as the fact that you are riding. And he hasn't behaved in a manner here that suggests that he has anything against women. I believe he has also said that he has a scooter of his own that he rides once in a while. Just saying :)
 

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I dont think he meant any harm neither. Im just the type of lady who if a guy tells me i cant do something cause im a lady ill do it just to prove him wrong. The only thing i cant do is write my name in the snow but men cant give birth so we are even...
 
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