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Discussion Starter #1
well im 16 year old and i have a job and im saving up for a ninja 300 abs there is a place near me thats selling it for 1000$ off msrp its like 4299$ or something and i cant pay for it all at once. i was wondereing if i saved up like 1000$ for the bike to put a down pament on would they do that and **** and my parents from what they tell me have really ****ty credit and im pretty sure i dont have credit and i cant buy it under my name anyways but i was just seeing do you guys think i can put a 1000$ downpament on it with ****ty credit or will they not take downpaments cuz the **** credit? thanks.
 

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If you google legal age to enter into a sales contract you will find that most states require you to be at least 18. This is just one of the ones I came up with. I hope it helps.

POWER TO ENTER INTO A CONTRACT

All persons, who are not minors or mentally incompetent lack, have the legal capacity to enter into contracts. In most states, the legal age for entering into contracts is 18. The test for mental capacity is whether the party understood the nature and consequences of the transaction in question.
 

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I think it would bw wise to ise the 1000 on a used bike. There is nothing wrong with used. New riders do better in used bikes. Most end up dropping bikes doing slow maneuvers. It would hurt more on a brand new bike
 

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You have to be 18 to take a loan, because you have to be 18 to be held legally responsible. Besides, buying a new bike is not generally a good idea. Buy a used bike and get a year or two of experience. Then, when you're 18, you can go buy the bike you want and borrow the money if you choose.
 

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You have to be 18 to take a loan, because you have to be 18 to be held legally responsible. Besides, buying a new bike is not generally a good idea. Buy a used bike and get a year or two of experience. Then, when you're 18, you can go buy the bike you want and borrow the money if you choose.
You can be taken to Court and charged as an Adult for Federal Crimes at 16. Don't understand "18" for Contractual rights. I believe it; but there is an inconsistency there on the part of the Government, but that's another Thread in another Forum.



-Soupy
 

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^^^ Yeap. There's a difference in civil and criminal laws, and federal and state laws. It's not inconsistency at all.

(And you can be tried as an adult in some cases on the state level at 14.)
 

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Take the MSF course first, have you Parents see if they can even have you insured on their policy---especially if you buy anything that has the name "Ninja" on it.

True story: I lived in California at the time and was in a local Honda motorcycle dealer, picking up my new 500 Interceptor and talking to the owner about YOUNG kids riding away on their first bike, that Mommy and Daddy bought for them, but somehow couldn't afford a helmet.:mad:

This was the time of the 600 Supersports with 100+ Horsepower and race track capabilities. A large proportion of these kids ended up in the hospital or morgue within a very short time: Look up motorcycle accident statistics and you'll see that the chances new, inexperienced riders have of serious injuries or death in the first few years of ownership is VERY high. Add in alcohol and drugs that lots of younger folks seem to enjoy and it's a recipe for disaster.

During my conversation with the shop owner, He told me that a brand new rider, never insured before on a Supersport bike would see yearly payments for insurance of between 3 to $4,000 per year. The year was 1986.

Sam:)
 

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I agree with getting a used bike. I haven't dropped mine, but I'm glad I got used my first time. Until I know how to take any corner with 100% confidence, or do a U-turn at >5 mph, I'll be sticking to the old machine.

also, do the msf course. have you even ridden before?

granted, the 300 ninja is good beginners bike. but personally, I'd go for a cheap 250 or even an old 650. 300 is relatively new, and newer bikes cost more. I got my '03 sv650 for $2400 (including title, taxes, and all that bull****). And having taken the MSF course, I knew what I was getting into, and was able to get a good handle on the bike within a few days. It varies with individual. Had I not wanted to commute on the highway, I'd have gone with a 250 for the mpg, but I'm glad I went with the 650.

if you're patient, pick out the bikes you want, and lurk around craigslist for a while to get a feel for the market. it's winter, so it's just a matter of time before a really sweet deal comes up. just don't crash on the test drive and have your parents there.
 

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It has already been said above but I cannot emphasise enough that inexperienced riders drop bikes.

Personally I have only ever had one accident in 40 years of riding but I would say I am the exception not the rule. I get folks coming on my tours who are experienced riders but they are riding a rental and that is unfamiliar to them. I have never had a rider who has had an accident on tour but I've plenty who drop a bike in the car park.

So, get started with an old bike. That way when you drop it it will be no big deal. There are 2nd hand bikes you can buy with your $1000 but remember to keep some funds to cover the insurance.

In addition to getting riding lessons it is a good idea to see if you can get a motorcycle mechanics course at your local college. That will save you a lot in potential repairs and maintenance.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Everyone saying i should buy a used bike what bike should i get i really want a abs bike but i cant find any older abs bikes
 

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Why do you want an ABS bike? Sure they can be "safer" for an inexperienced rider, but as long as the bike you buy has brakes in good shape, it will server you well. And you need to learn proper braking technique


What bike should YOU buy? I don't know where you live, but if you like Ninjas, check this one out (as an example)

http://wwwb.autotrader.ca/a/Kawasaki/Ninja+250R/WOODSTOCK/Ontario/19_8276211_/?ms=motorcycles_atvs&showcpo=ShowCPO&orup=3_15_8

It's an example of a potential great starter bike that won't cost you much to get going.

Don't forget to call your insurance company to get a quote BEFORE you buy anything!!! A 16 year old newbie on a sport bike is something the insurance companies often get nervous about, so your estimate might be kinda high.
 

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You know that the purchase cost of the bike is just the start. Then there's rego, insurance, maintenance (even if you do it yourself, oil and parts cost money) and fuel.

Then there's riding gear. A set of ATGATT (all the gear all the time) will be some hundreds of dollars, but you do need good boots, gloves (if you fall off you WILL put your hands out!), some kevlar reinforced jeans, jacket and, most importantly, a good helmet.

I picked a 300 sports bike rider up off the road and took him to hospital, he who was only wearing flip flops, shorts, a tee shirt and a helmet and had come off at a round about (traffic island) on a diesel spill at only 30 km/hr (20 mph) or so - you do NOT want to go there! Could see the knee cap bone (or is it actually cartilage? it's white anyway), minced up toes, he wasn't going to be using his hands for quite some time, and red stuff was oozing through his ripped tee shirt and shorts.

Good that you've saved up some money, and I do recommend buying a second hand bike too. The absolute best learner bike is a 250, lighter, easier to handle, cheaper 2nd hand and resaleable. As well, you'll probably want to upgrade after a year or so whatever you start on. I did 20 months/24,000 km (15,000 miles) on a 250 learner cruiser when I started riding at 61, best decision I made.

And do the MSF course!!!! Can't emphasise that more.
 

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I would not suggest ABS for a first bike. l had the same idea when l got my endorsement, but it was suggested to me that braking is one of the most valuable skills and l would be much better off learning to brake effectively before getting a bike with ABS rather than after it. ln hindsight, braking has become something that l am very conscientious about, and it is something that l practice regularly. lf l had just bought an ABS bike l almost certainly would not be as good at stopping my bike as l am.
 
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