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Vintage Rider
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420 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I do quit a few restorations in my shop for myself only. A lot are 4 strokes, but thought I'd put in a 2 stroke build thread I was working on earlier this spring.
About 5+ years ago, I purchased a '67 Suzuki B105p (aka "Bearcat") which is a 120cc single two stroke trail bike. It was poorly rattle canned in some strange maroon metal flake that was down right ugly. However the bike was somewhat complete with only 896 original miles.

Here's what it looked like when I got it home.


It had spent it's life until the '90s running up and down the beaches of South Carolina. After getting it to fire up 5 yrs ago to see if the engine sounded OK, I rode it less than a mile because the fuel tank had the bottom rusted completely out, and I had to carry a portable tank while riding.:icon_mad: After checking it out, I just put it in my project queue, while searching for parts that I'd need to bring it back to some kind of respectable machine.

Once I finally took it apart I sent it out for media blasting and paint. Even though it had originally been red, I decided to go with black, because I already have a nice red "Bearcat" also with less than a 1000 miles on it, which is a survivor. But recently I had to get another red parts bike to help with parts as well.

Here I'm beginning to sort out the painted parts to get ready for assembly.


About the only thing not black is the injection oil tank.


Here we have the swing arm, rear fender extension piece and front foot peg bar.


Here's the replacement fuel tank, since the original was beyond repair. Notice how the fill pipe is not painted.


After sealing the edge of the paint with a RC airplane type of paint made by Midwest Products P/N 65-4 it will prevent any lifting or bubbling of the paint from seepage or vapors. Once fuel get's under the paint, there is no saving the paint job. Learned this the hard way a while back. Here's the product I use to seal the edge of the paint where it meets the neck. If the neck is painted, there's no way to protect it.



http://midwestproducts.com/products/clear-aero-gloss-paint-1-oz

I always start a build by installing the triple tree and front forks.
I was unable to find an NOS set of gaiters for the Bearcat, however a CL175 K6 Honda has the same size ends, length and number of ribs. The only problem was Suzuki has an exposed spring inside the boots that was slightly larger in diameter than the boot ribs. This may or may not be a problem as they do touch the rubbler.
Forks after assembly.


After putting in all 36 ball bearings, (18 top and 18 bottom.) I put together the triple tree. Almost forgot to put on the fork lock, which would have been impossible once the triple tree is in place.


The forks were then installed and tightened in with the pinch bolts. The newly polished handle bar brackets hold in the top of the forks.


Next, the center stand is put on it's pivot bolt with a little fresh grease.

....Now that's it's starting to stand up I'll call it good till next update.
 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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14,359 Posts
looks great
 

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Shaper Of All Things Metal
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2,799 Posts
My eyes hurt from trying to find the imperfections that do not exist in your work. :p

Thanks for letting us peek over your shoulder on all these projects. Your workmanship is par excellence.:thumbsup:
 

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Female Rider
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9,311 Posts
Yep, great so far. Just wondering...How many bikes do you have??? Looks like you might be related to Jay Leno. :D :D
 

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Vintage Rider
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420 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Yep, great so far. Just wondering...How many bikes do you have??? Looks like you might be related to Jay Leno. :D :D
Love that Leno guy, wish he hadn't retired, but sadly no relationship!:biggrin:
I did a little write up on my shop and madness in this thread, but my exact numbers can vary slightly, (usually growing :)) so I'll keep them private;)
http://www.motorcycleforum.com/showthread.php?t=165706

part 2
Decided it was time to start putting the wiring harness into the frame, while I could still get my hands in there to pull things through to there proper location.
Noticed that Suzuki used the same sub-contractor to furnish their wiring harnesses as Honda did during the same time period. (Sumitomo Wiring Systems, Ltd) (Excuse the greasy finger's, pic was taken during dis-assembly)


The date on this harness is 1966, but Bearcat B105p's weren't sold until '67 to about Sept of '68 when they were replaced by the KT120 Bearcat which then had a 3 spd with dual range transmission, while the B105p used a dual sprocket arrangement and 4 spd transmission. It was typical for the wiring harness's to be made and purchased 6 month's to a year in advance of being placed in a frame.

One thing I always try to be aware of, is getting good grounding after new paint. I usually just use a die grinder and carefully remove paint where the pieces meet and can be hidden.
Here I've made a good grounding path for the combination ignition switch. This bike, having a magneto ignition system will require the switch assembly to be grounded, if I plan to shut the motor down. ;)


Wiring harness is put in place as well as the half-wave rectifier inside the frame.


As you can see the PO, cut the wire's prior to the headlight bucket as well as at the tail light. :( Repairs will be made when tying everything in. Main harness comes through the front frame hole, while the horn wires through the second hole. I've also added the front fender in this picture.


At this point, I went ahead and put the front wheel assembly together and installed it on the forks.


With front wheel on, it's time to put on the swing arm after some new grease on the bushings. The rear shocks on a Bearcat are offset and always look kinda crooked to me, but somehow it always evens out visually once the muffler is in place along with the luggage rack. I've also threaded the tail/brake light wiring through the little channels in the frame.

...more to come...later!:)
 

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Vintage Rider
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420 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
part 3

Back to work on the Suzuki,
Started by putting in a new rubber grommet through the frame for the injection oil line passage and brake light wiring.


Next I installed the coil inside the frame held by the 2 screws in the middle of this picture.


Finally got to the rear fender extension piece, carefully grinding off some paint around the tail light bracket. This is a 2 wire tail/brake light so grounding must get back to the battery through the housing, light bracket, fender and finally the frame and battery.
After it's all in place, I checked to make sure both filaments were working from the other end of the harness. I'd rather know now than chase down problems later. Here it is with brake light glowing.


Always help's to have a wiring diagram around just in case. I like the picture type diagrams Suzuki and Yamaha used in the '60's as if you needed all the orientation to know what part is where. This one is probably the world's simplest design.


Thought I'd go ahead and get the rear wheel assembly put on now so I can get it off the lift if necessary.
Here it is, but I seem to be having a difficult time getting a decent picture of a black bike. :confused: It seems to just show a solid black silhouette or a reflective glare back if I use flash. (Must be too darn shiny :p)


A closer shot of the dual sprocket arrangement. Both of my Bearcats have identical 72 tooth large sprocket and they were originally sold in different regions of the country. Part's manual's show only up to 50 teeth, so I don't really think they are from Suzuki. I've never put a chain on the large sprocket, but would imagine it could be a pretty decent hill climber with it.


Also put on the rear pegs.


Now it was time to find a spot in the shade, to sit down and polish some more pieces. :)
One of the handlebar perches.

....still more to come!
 

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Vintage Rider
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420 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Time for another update, although this project seemed to get delayed a lot, as I was planning on having it ready for a local show in June but that obviously didn't happen. So got a couple other bikes dusted off for that.

Got in a new NOS chrome mud shield that I went ahead and put on. Many of the '60's Suzuki had the metal mud flap, and very few survived without being bent in half. The original mudflap on this bike was no exception, and just wasn't worth trying to salvage. After all it's only money$$$$$ :wink:


I was able to hang the motor myself, although it's not very heavy, it can be a problem wedging it in, since the frame has to go in behind the left case half.


With the chain on the sprockets, the rubber guides were installed. Then the newly polished left case cover...... Dang that's bright! :icon_cool:


Another view of the skid plate in place with the chrome braces supporting the front. The brake pedal had to be removed again, so I could get the installation sequence right. The only proper sequence is : skid plate, then foot bar and finally the braces and brake pedal.


Right side case still needs more polish to balance out the bling! ;)
Also, some may notice that there are two oil fill caps. The Bearcat is filled from the front cap as the muffler is in the way of the rear cap, unlike the Magnum or B100p street version with the low swept muffler.

.......Back onto the project for a couple hours this morning, and decided to finally install the injection oil tank, with new sight glass and seals as well as the correct decal.


Next it was time to finish up the electrical repair as well as final testing of the components. Appears to have a rectifier problem, will work on that again later.
Head light bucket is installed with speedometer and cable routed to front wheel. Horn installed also. On the plus side, it kicks over with a nice fat blue spark at the plug!


Head light and all bulbs also wired in and working with switch. Was hoping my new clutch and front brake levers would have arrived by now, so I can finish installing the rest of the cables.


A straight ahead picture of the unique shaped Suzuki headlight.

.....later everyone!
 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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14,359 Posts
That is going to be sweet.
 

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Shaper Of All Things Metal
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2,799 Posts
Love the chrome mud-flap!

Just wondering... do you ever sleep? When I'm working on projects my brain won't shut down, even if my body won't keep going.
 

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Vintage Rider
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420 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
......Just wondering... do you ever sleep? When I'm working on projects my brain won't shut down, even if my body won't keep going.
Oh yes, waking up in the middle of the night and not being able to go back to sleep isn't fun. Thankfully usually happens only when facing some kind of conundrum with a project. I find it very beneficial to only start a project when I'm pretty sure I have everything I need to keep the project moving along. Waiting or searching for some part that's needed to proceed isn't good for me:frown: That's why most of my projects are in queue for 1 to 2 years or even longer before I start. Which then lets me stay busy all summer and spend winter mostly looking for more parts or projects. Believe me I'm already getting wore out and ready for winter:biggrin: Not complaining, as this is still a fun hobby which I hope I can do for at least another decade.:) I just drove a couple hundred miles yesterday to pick up a nice CB160 Honda which I should get to restore mid to late summer next year.
 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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I started my motorcycle life on a CB160. Looking forward to that build
 

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Vintage Rider
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420 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I started my motorcycle life on a CB160. Looking forward to that build
Not wishing to side track this thread, but just a sneak peek for you, Critter.
Here's a pic of the CB160 I picked up yesterday. All parts are obtainable and most accounted for. I do have the front fender, just not mounted.


This Black CB160 will join "Casper", my rare all white CB160 in the stable:biggrin:
Issues with the title have kept Casper in the project queue for over 4 years now. Seems like our DMV doesn't like it when the seller doesn't put a middle initial in his signature when it's typed that way on the front of the title. I know, it's ridiculous here.:mad:

There you have it, Critter. Casper now has a Black sister:wink:
 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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Doesn't look like it needs a lot of work. Mine was red. In fact all but one of my bikes have been red.
 

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Vintage Rider
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420 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Looks really good, and you do great work!

Was that model airplane paint, or dope?
According to Midwest, the manufacturer, it is a clear paint which can be applied over their dope colors. Again use part # 65-4.

Continuing with this build again, carburetor was cleaned again and installed. Then covered with the always hard to find, Suzuki Carb cover sets. Most have been tossed by original owners to make it easier to fiddle with tuning.


Next up is the installation of new clutch and front brake levers followed by routing and clipping in all cables.


Cables terminating at the clutch, oil injection pump, throttle slide and enrichment/choke valve. Also now have polished clutch cover.


With cables tucked away, now we can mount the tank in it's rubber cushions.


New petcock and fuel line was installed.


Next I bolted on the original skid resistant/suede seat. Good seats are next to impossible to find and this one has some minor issues as well.


Tank chrome sides panels were installed next.


Followed by the badges and knee grips.


....and a pic of the left side as well.

....next update soon, as this project should be wrapped up!!!
 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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That is looking great
 

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Vintage Rider
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420 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Time to finalize the Bearcat build so new projects as well as needed maintenance can begin again.
Moving on with the muffler system, the header pipe is put into place but left loose for easy movement as needed.


Next the luggage rack is installed since it shares a supporting mount with the muffler. After I got the muffler on, I discovered I had another very nice muffler and header pipe I'd probably been saving for this project for a couple of years. :confused: Don't know if I'll put that one on later as this one's is also in great shape.


Moving back to the left side, the battery and tool kit holder bracket is placed in frame.


Finally the side cover is put in place, until I decide to put in a battery.
This is the final picture before taking it off the lift.


One of the things I've mentioned before, was the 72 tooth power gear that both of my B105p's have installed, instead of the standard 50 tooth larger sprocket.
This larger sprocket would have interfered with the chrome chain guard, so they have disappeared due to PO's. Two years of searching hasn't turned up a suitable guard, but I know they are out there, just not for sale

Since the rain finally stopped long enough for the sun to barely peak out, I rolled it out side for some more pics, but was disappointed in the lighting.
First, as I've done with all my build threads, I gotta show the closest picture I could find from a brochure featuring a Black model B105p.

And for comparison my Black Bearcat!

.....and the left side


As you can see the original mileage is low as well. Not even broken in.

Since I've already got a nice running Red Bearcat, which I ride quite regularly, I'm not sure what I'll do with this one. Maybe just display it on the wall of my shop!.....Oh boy, I can already hear the groans of the "ride 'em, don't hide 'em" crowd.:biggrin:
 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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Just a thought please don't throw an old piston at me.

Why not sell it to someone who will look after it and take care of it. That will put a few bucks in the kitty to purchase others or parts
 

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Vintage Rider
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420 Posts
Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Just a thought please don't throw an old piston at me.

Why not sell it to someone who will look after it and take care of it. That will put a few bucks in the kitty to purchase others or parts
Not gonna throw anything at you, but if I sell one of my Bearcat's, it would be my red one. I just turned 1000 miles on it a couple of days ago, so it is now broken in;). They are quite rare, but don't demand any money, so will hang on to the Black one for awhile. I'll show it a few times and then put it away for my heirs to worry about:p. Since they are relatively cheap it would really bum me out to see some newbie builder wannabe get it as a platform for his so called art:frown:
Here's my red Bearcat....with the street version seat and minus the luggage rack!


.....not broken in when this pic was taken;)
 
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