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Honda Gold Wing Service Specialist
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've started another restoration project, a 1983 Suzuki GN125. Nice little beginner bike.

I've attached a couple of pictures. First one when I just rolled it into my shop. Looking pretty good from a distance. Second one is partially torn down. The deeper I look, the more stuff is screwed up on it or missing, or worn, or damaged. Ordered about $150.00 worth of new parts for it today. But, I love doing this kind of restoration work.

All is going well at this point except for the exhaust header pipe. It's held onto the cylinder head with two stud bolts that are screwed into the head. One is OK. The second one is broken off in the head with only about 1/4" of the stud sticking out.

I've been soaking it with PB Blaster for the past few days. Haven't tried to turn on it yet.

What methods have you all used to remove a broken stud bolt like this?

Any experience or advice would be appreciated before I start poking at it!
 

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Ghost in the machine
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2,857 Posts
If it sticking out 1/4", I would try threading a nut on it as far as possible. Then weld the nut to the stud on the inside of the nut, then use a wrench to unscrew it. It may also help to try unscrewing it while it is still hot from the welding process.

That's just what I would try FIRST, as my luck with drilling and easy-outs has been hit & miss. Someone else may have a better idea.
 

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if you can thread it and double nut it do so,you can use heat and cool to loosen it up,I usually tap, rap on it before trying to loosen it,if it doesn't go repeat until it does,dont force it.
 

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Biker
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1,624 Posts
I had good luck with things like this, got a spray bottle an put Marvel mystery oil in and sprayed the heck out of the broken bolt,
with small grinder, added 2 flat spots and with vice grips slowly twisted it out.
 

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Visionary
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5,278 Posts
Start simple, did you try grabbing it with channel locks, vicegrips or robogrips and trying to just get it out? Steel into aluminum might just come out, especially if you heat up the aluminum. Squeeze hard and see if it moves. Don't destroy it, just try this easy way first.
If not then the welded nut trick is a great one that I've done many times at work, if you have welding equipment that is what I would do next.

Try to avoid falling back to the last resort of drilling it out and extracting it, that works but there are some pitfalls and it doesn't always go well.
 

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If it sticking out 1/4", I would try threading a nut on it as far as possible. Then weld the nut to the stud on the inside of the nut, then use a wrench to unscrew it. It may also help to try unscrewing it while it is still hot from the welding process.

That's just what I would try FIRST, as my luck with drilling and easy-outs has been hit & miss. Someone else may have a better idea.
Good advice on stud broken off flush I weld a washer to the stud then a nut to the washer and then try to ease it out so the advice to weld a nut on is good. you may need to apply some heat to the aluminum when trying to ease it out so you don't break it again. I have had zero luck with easy outs as they normally break off and then you have real problems. worst case is to drill it out then retap.
 

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Honda Gold Wing Service Specialist
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211 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks much for all of the ideas and advice!

No, I haven't tried anything yet to get it out. Just been spraying it with PB Blaster for the last two days and tapping on it with a small hammer to set up some vibrations.

I agree that drilling and Easy-Outs are a last resort and usually don't work well.

Welding on a nut is a great idea, but I'll have to either rent/borrow a welding machine or take the bike to a shop and let them weld one on for me.

Also, just found out about "stud extractors" from a friend. Here's one I may get on Amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01GKEBG9I/?coliid=I193BYBU83WIF3&colid=1NGA3I8B74DK9&psc=0&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it

He's uses these with great success on studs broken off in automobile cylinder heads. It looks like the tool will be a bit too big on the end to get it in to reach the broken stud on this little engine.

I may start on this effort this afternoon for a bit. (After tomorrow I''ll be out of commission for a while, having cataract eye surgery!)

Thanks again.
 

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Ghost in the machine
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2,857 Posts
Start simple, did you try grabbing it with channel locks, vicegrips or robogrips and trying to just get it out? Steel into aluminum might just come out, especially if you heat up the aluminum. Squeeze hard and see if it moves. Don't destroy it, just try this easy way first.
If not then the welded nut trick is a great one that I've done many times at work, if you have welding equipment that is what I would do next.

Try to avoid falling back to the last resort of drilling it out and extracting it, that works but there are some pitfalls and it doesn't always go well.
The only problem with using pliers or vise grips is that it is very likely to mess up whatever threads may be left showing. Then it will likely be harder to get a nut on it. I assume it is VERY stuck and would not come out with just a vise grips, as it already is so stuck that it snapped off just trying to remove the original exhaust clamp nut.
 

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Honda Gold Wing Service Specialist
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211 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
I got it out ! ! !

The nasty broken stud bolt is out! :grin:

I could not get any Vise Grip pliers on it from a right angle, which would provide the most leverage. I could only get a pliers on it from straight in at it, and even then not enough room to rotate the pliers if the tip was too big.

Got a "Vampliers" for my birthday and decided to give it a try. The teeth on the thing are designed to do just this kind of job, and I could get it on the broken stud and had just enough room to rotate it.

Tried it by hand at first, but couldn't get enough pressure on the grips to keep it from just spinning on the bolt. So, I used a bar clamp to put some real pressure on the handles of the Vampliers so it could bite into the stud better.

Gave it a small turn and heard a "pop"! Figured either I broke off the quarter inch that was sticking out or it actually broke free! It had broken free!

So, hallelujah, it's out and my cylinder head is saved! :grin:

Gonna attach some pictures of the Vamplier and how I had it set up to get the stud out.

Also, here's a link to the Vampire Tools web site: https://www.vampiretools.com/

$45.00 for a pliers seemed like a lot, but the thing works! Check out the teeth on the thing in the last picture and you can see the longitudinal grooves that help it grab a bolt from straight on.
 

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Honda Gold Wing Service Specialist
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211 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Good job and you had the right tools for the job. I am guess the stud was broken by over tightening rather than it being seized so good luck on your part.
I think you're right. The threads on the section of the stud that was inside the head were not all rusted or anything, so that really helped with getting it out. Plus two days of PB Blaster! :grin:

I'm finding a lot of stuff on this poor little bike that has either been done wrong or screwed up by a PO.

At any rate, it's out, and I'm moving on with the restoration.

***
 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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15,538 Posts
Good job, I had never heard of those pliers. Looks like something else my tool box needs :)
 
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