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ZAMM Fanatic
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Discussion Starter #1
found this on the Bosch website:

The MSC motorcycle stability control system is based on a Bosch ABS plus an electronic composite brake function. All the rider has to do is apply the front or back brake. The system automatically applies the second brake, ensuring that the best possible braking force is applied to each wheel.

A lean-angle sensor measures the actual lean of the motorcycle allowing the system to instantaneously adjust its electronic braking and acceleration interventions to suit the current riding status. In this way, it provides the best possible support in bends (corners).

Given that nearly 50% of fatal motorcycle accidents happen in a bend, this is especially important. Precise regulation offers a smooth progression in brake pressure as the rider leans in for the corner, as well as boosting deceleration on the straight.

By analyzing tilt rate and linear acceleration, the system can tell sooner when the front or rear wheel is about to lift off, allowing MSC to intervene with a corrective action. Brake force is distributed flexibly and fast between the front and rear wheel according to the driving situation, ensuring the safest and best possible deceleration.

fast forward to :53
fast forward to :53

Current ABS algorithms do not consider the side inclination, and are, therefore, not able to adapt the antilock braking function during cornering. For this reason, Bosch has developed a stability control system for high-performance motorcycles that works in all situations: during both braking and accelerating, and while either riding straight or while cornering.


"I can do a better job modulating my braking while cornering than that @#[email protected]# computer can in 3....2....1..."
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American Legion Rider
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Like to know how it keeps from righting the bike unless it's just as simple as it taking over and applying less brake. I didn't hear or see anything about gyros.
 

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ZAMM Fanatic
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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Like to know how it keeps from righting the bike unless it's just as simple as it taking over and applying less brake. I didn't hear or see anything about gyros.
Agreed. Classic case of what Engineering probably said and what marketing "claims" being different, PLUS the translation from German...

Anybody know what ACTUALLY makes a bike stand upright when you brake in a corner?

Is it the gyroscopic effect of a wheel slowing down?

I'm not sure why slowing the front vs the rear would change that as I doubt the Bosch MSC can do much BESIDES alter brake balance...

But if you think about it, that explains why ADDING throttle in a corner (when you're in trouble and need additional lean) actually works.

To answer your question, yes, the MSC system HAS a gyro, but I'm guessing it's either a microscopic mechanical one (gyro on a chip) or a laser gyro, and the gyro itself isn't massive enough to alter the bike dynamics, it's just used to measure lean and rotation of the bike..

Boy, is THIS going to be a long discussion!
 

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American Legion Rider
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wadenelson said:
the MSC system HAS a gyro, but I'm guessing it's either a microscopic mechanical one (gyro on a chip) or a laser gyro, and the gyro itself isn't massive enough to alter the bike dynamics, it's just used to measure lean and rotation of the bike..
I kinda figured that but I'm more wondering how they keep the bike from standing up without a large gyro. I'm still guess less brake more throttle but still maintain max braking.

I thought this whole system had been designed for track use a few years back. Trying to allow the rider to go full throttle all the way through a race. It sure does have application on the street though.
 

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American Legion Rider
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wadenelson said:
Boy, is THIS going to be a long discussion!
Won't be if people don't understand what that thing is actually doing.:(
 

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Gone.
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Centrifugal force DECREASES when you slow down while cornering. Just like a ball on a string. How's that gonna make the bike stand up?
It's more like a hammer on a string, but the hammer is standing upright at an angle to the string instead of just swinging at the end of it like a ball weight.

Think about what a bike looks like when viewed from the front in a turn. When you're cornering, the center of mass is higher then the center of centrifugal effort. As you lean into the turn that puts the CM closer to being in-line with the center of effort and things kind of balance against each other with tire traction keeping the bike from sliding towards the outside of the turn. (We hope.)

When you brake the decrease in forward motion unbalances the CM and CE and allows centrifugal force to push the upper part of the bike towards the outside of the turn, while tire friction keeps the lower part of the bike from being pushed outward as quickly. If you don't stop or regain your balance you'll start to tumble sideways towards the outside of the turn.

Or, imagine standing on one of those old kid-powered merry-go-rounds. As your buddy spins it around, if you just stand straight up at the edge and don't hold on, eventually it will go fast enough to throw you off. If you were to somehow nail your shoes to the thing your feet might stay in place but the rest of your body would be thrown towards the outside of the circle.
 
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