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Discussion Starter #1
Suzuki 650 dual sport, ok tore the motor down to the crankcase and replaced all the bleeding gaskets and rebuilt the carb.Put it all back together fires right up and purrs like a kitten but when I go to get on it it bogs down.Do I need some type of carb adjustment?Pilot screw it set to spec what else could it be?Thanks for all the help guys I am almost there I think,can't be much I hope.
 

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It could be the carb is over-filled, causing the engine to choke out; or, the carb has so little fuel in it that the engine can't rev. Look at a spark plug, to see which.
 

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Severe intake leak? Stuck advance mechanism or poor timing? Just guesses.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I checked and double checked the timing putting it back together so I don't think that's it.What is the advance mech?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Also tried reseating the carb thinking of intake leak maybe I still have it out of whack a little gonna get some wd and check that next I guess
 

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I would suspect a mis-adjusted accelerator pump, if it has one, or a slightly obstructed accelerator pump jet or orifice. As a (very) general rule you want a little tension on the operating mechanism when the bike is at idle, so there's no hesitation when you twist the throttle.

If it doesn't have an accelerator pump I'd suspect the off-idle circuit has an obstruction.
 

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Harley65... First, I tip my hat to you. In a few older posts, you admit to being a noob when it comes to the work you are committed to doing on this bike. I admire your determination.

That said (and before you start yanking out your hair and getting frustrated), try this simple task. There's only one way I know of to determine the problem as you describe it. If your bike fires right up and idles good, but bogs down when you give the throttle a twist, You need to isolate why. I would gain access to the air filter, fire the bike up and shoot starting fluid into the airbox as close to the carb as possible and as you do this twist the throttle. If the engine revs up, then it's starving for fuel. If it still bogs down, then there's too much fuel.

Based on all the posts you've made concerning this project, I'm betting when you twist the throttle, your engine is receiving too much fuel. In all my years as a motorcycle mechanic, I've seen this exact problem (symptom) many times. If the above test shows too much fuel (engine still bogs), pull the carb out of the intake seat and airbox hose and rotate it so that you can look into the airbox side of the carb venturi. You should see the vacuum slide and the main jet needle. Look at the needle and follow it down to the bottom of the venturi tube. Do you see a metal tube sticking up (and around) the needle? It will rise about one-eighth of an inch above the bottom of the venturi. That little tube is known as the main jet needle GUIDE. It is OFTEN overlooked by inexperienced people, thus it is often lost when they take the carb apart. When you remove the main jet, then the main jet holder, there's nothing holding that guide in place. Typically, they require a bit of force to get them to fall out. But when you soak the carb in solvent, they sometimes fall right out and get left behind in the dip can, or worse. Please check to see if this has happened. It shouldn't take too long to do.

Keeps us updated!!!
 

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And the accelerator pump is a small auxiliary pump, usually operated by an arm or a rod attached to the throttle cable drum. When you twist the throttle it will shoot a small jet of fuel directly into the incoming airstream. Usually you'll see a small jet sticking up right in the very front of the carburetor throat, and when you twist the throttle you'll actually see it squirt gas into the throat.
 
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