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I'm getting ready to buy a standard/trad/naked style bike, leaning towards a Speed Twin. It occurred to me that some bikes they used to sell may be my choice today if they still made them. I would go so far as to say that most of these bikes do not have a true modern peer as styles and design have changed so drastically and specialization rules. Today's big standards seem more like supersports - fairings + riser bars + retuned. I don't have a problem with tuning for torque but with some of the bigger motors like the Bandit and ZRX1200 you get such a nice, fat powerband!

How about bringing back:

Suzuki Bandit 1250 (07-16 partial)- Liquid cooled, 100HP that felt like 150 on the street. I used to own the original a 97 air/oil cooled Bandit 1200.

Honda CBR600F2&F3 (1991-1998). Remember when 600cc sportbikes were rideable? I sure do!

Yamaha YZF600r. (1995-2007) Actually owned one of these, a 95 model, see post above about rideable streetbikes

Kawasaki ZRX1100/1200 (1997-2005). This, OMG this one.

Kawasaki ZL1000 Eliminator. Was it a UJM? A Cruiser? It certainly looked evil. Honorable mention to various V45 and V65 magnas.

Honda VFR800 (1998-2001). The pinnacle of the model before Vtec came along to complicate things and improve nothing. Could stand to lose 30-40 pounds with a naked version. I owned a 98 model for 5 years and 25k miles.

Honda CB1000 (1992-1996). I think an opportunity was lost when the Nighthawk 750 and CB1000 left the scene. The bigger bike was a looker and had a reasonable 100 HP and would hold its own against many of today's standards while bringing a lot of tradition to the table. If the current CB1000 was more like the current, excellent Kawasaki Z900RS I think it would be very appealing. If the Z900RS was more like the ZRX1200 I'd probably just buy it.
 

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I have a '95 CB1000 in arrest-me-red with 50,000 on it. Just installed new Bridgestone Battlaxe T32 tires and a new speedometer cable. Have had one clutch replacement since I bought it new and fork seals replaced once. Wheels are pinstriped in red. Has a Two Brothers open exhaust with adjusted carbs. Naked engine and no windshield. It feels fast at 0-100 in 8 seconds and 1/4 mile in 11.79 and a joy to ride. :)
 

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Kawasaki in making a bunch of retro bikes.
Honda has the CB1100. Royal Enfield has the 650 twin. Triumph has the 900 twin Thruxton.
I have a 79 XS11 Special.
I used to own a CanAm 250 2 stroke that made about 38hp. More than the 350 and 400cc bikes back then. I rode all the 2 stroke Kawasaki's. 400 single dirt bike. Massive grunt. The 250 and 350 twins, and all the three cylinder bikes. The 68 350 twin was the best. There were others, but it could be a long story. UK
 

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Wow! I never knew...
I rode a few of those HARD when re-tuning. Soooo glad I never broke one. :eek:

S F
I never had a problem either, but I read about others having problems. And for that type bike, I never rode it to its limits, I would have exceeded mine long before I got there.

If I remember right, it was the third main journal that would not get enough lube.
 

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I never rode a 2-stroke. However, I used a 2-stroke 1-hp lawn trimmer recently and man, what power that thing had. I can now appreciate what you said.
I had a 1937 DKW bike and a 1958 DKW Station wagon. Both were made in Germany and both were two stroke. Both had surprising acceleration!! Mixing oil with gas was a pain for the bike but the car had a mixer built into the tank. Fond memories of ring-ding-dink-a-ding- ding when releasing the throttle!
 

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I sometimes wish for my abnormal '72 BSA Thunderbolt. It was relatively easy to make a nice cafe' racer out of it. Mine was agile, light, well-balanced, and reliable as a stone - which is why I say it was abnormal - their reputation was otherwise.

However, when I categorize what I loved about that bike and combine with all the problems I would have trying to actually have and use a real one, I figure I can get most of what I loved in it out of my DRZ400 with not too many mods, and more importantly, without the muscle-memory challenges of switching shifter/brake operation and the potential mountain-climbing challenges of having a reliable, efficient bike.
 

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Didn't have my TR-3 long enough to find out, but my MGB was a very reliable car. Daily driver for quite a few years.
Friend of mine had two Spitfires. They would sheer off the bolts that held the clutch to the flywheel. He became quite good at removing the transmission, extracting the sheered bolts, and putting it back together.
 
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