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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

After a few years of use, for the first time this winter I actually covered my 2015 CB650F and let if sit for a month outside (I usually ride all winter). The weather was pretty warm actually, rarely dropping below freezing. I tried to start it the other day and the pump turns on, the lights as well, and the starter tries to turn the bike on but there's no ignition. I took the battery out and the charged it with the battery tender, put it back, no improvement. I just had the spark plugs changed a few months back, and I'd be surprised if they went dead after less than a month of no use. I'd need to take the bike to the garage to replace the spark plugs. My question: if it is the spark plugs, is there a way to revive them without replacing? Also, if it's not the spark plugs, what could it be? I'm thinking air intake or something related? Thanks in advance, and let me know if I can provide more clarification.

M
 

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The battery should have been connected to a tender while not in use. The fuel may be a bit flat.
You give no hint about the temperature or your location, and that impacts what I just said. If the plugs are 4 years old, buy new ones. All you can do is clean the old plugs and set the gap.
I have know idea if your bike is fuel injected, or has carburetors.
Do a load test on your battery. Check the specific gravity. If it gives any hint of not being perfect, replace it.
Check your owners manual for starting instructions. Report back.

UK
 

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Moderator - Loves All Motorcycles
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The 2015 CB650F is fuel injected. Assuming you were riding it somewhat regularly before it sat for that month, fuel shouldn't be much of an issue, either.

Try a different battery? Sometimes I've found that once a motorcycle battery goes completely dead it's not quite the same even after it gets "charged".
 

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Nightfly
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Give it a quick spray of ether. Even if the engine is not getting fuel it will fire for a couple seconds. Then you will know if you have spark. I highly doubt it is your plugs especially if only a couple months old as you say. But anything can happen.

I believe you said it was sitting outside. Could be a little critter climbed aboard and played havoc with some of the wires. But if it fires with ether, you've got spark, just not a good supply of fuel. A battery tender is not the way to recharge a battery. I am assuming you've checked for loose or corroded connection with the cables.
 

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AC Delco Charging instructions. In the box with a new battery, February 019. An initial charge is required before placing battery into service. For best results and maximum life, use a 500m Amp Trickle Charger. see chart.
About 14 hours for DP battery.
The only small amp charger I have is the battery maintainer.

Further down.
Note: If you have a 2 Amp or 6 Amp charger, use the automatic setting and charge until charger indicates complete charge.
After sitting the specific gravity should be 1.282 and the battery should be 12.7 volts.

I use the battery maintainer to charge new batteries, and usually leave them on for 24 hours. I use the 2 amp auto function for the larger bike batteries if needed.

I suspect the OP did not leave the maintainer on long enough. Then if the bike does not fire, the batteries do not crank for long.
I have jumped the battery, but only from another bike battery, and only to save time.

Wintsol has mentioned not exceeding 10% of the battery amps.

UK
 

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Swamp Rat Rider
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Have to have fire from the Coil for the Spark Plugs to work .. Possibly Ignition Module as well .. Tobacco road is spot on for testing if you actually have Spark ..
 

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I have know idea if your bike is fuel injected, or has carburetors.
Fuel injected and liquid cooled.

The airbox is between the engine and fuel tank. You need to do
a bit of stripping to get at the spark plugs. This is not ideal
for roadside diagnostics, although my 22 year old Kawasaki is
just as bad.
 

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Ace Tuner
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I'm voting for a new battery too.
I'm guessing the battery may be the original and sitting for a month probably killed it.
Almost four years old then no use for a month, makes sense.

Spark plugs should not be harmed from non use for a month.
 

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Never had a tender on mine and never had to jump it. That is one of the advantages of living where you can ride year round (sorry, just gloating).
 

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Moderator - Loves All Motorcycles
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Never had a tender on mine and never had to jump it. That is one of the advantages of living where you can ride year round (sorry, just gloating).
*Tries to give you a major side eye but can't because everything is frozen.*

I don't have a tender on any of my bikes either. I just make sure to start and run them once every month on a day that's above freezing. It's how I keep my garage queen cars fresh, too.
 
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American Legion Rider
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So Miss M, do any of your batteries last 7 years or more. Mine do with a tender. One good tender can service several batteries making that one little purchase pay for itself many times over. I've even heard of a few getting as much as 15 years but I'd never boast that because surely there must be more to that story. But I've personally got 7 years several times on different batteries. I have purchase more tenders after I saw the advantage instead of tripping over extra lines.
 

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Out of my four cars, my oldest battery is now 10 years old and is in need of replacement. Second oldest is 7 years and it probably has a year left in it. Third is a 2016, and fourth a 2018. My oldest bike battery is the 2017 that's in my Goldwing. I drive/ride/run my vehicles often enough not to warrant a tender. That said, next winter I'll probably get a tender anyway, just to save me trips to my storage unit.

The computers in my cars (I have four of the same model, but different generations) are very demanding and as a result, there are pretty much no owners of these cars that have batteries older than 9-10 years. Around this time, the computers start having drive system errors and will eventually leave you stranded, even if your battery is fully charged.
 

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American Legion Rider
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You are doing much better than I was. I was lucky to get 3 years out of one until I started using tenders on everything. Some, because of computers, demand a tender.
 
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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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07 RSTD bought in summer of 14 put on a tender when not used. Do not know how old the battery is.

88 Springer bought in summer of 16, had been on a tender when I got it, still is. No idea how old it is,


Boat bought in 14 had a single battery that he replaced every year. It now has 2 batteries on tenders all winter, including the one that was in it when I bought it.

My 06 Solstice has a fair share of after market electronics and will drain a battery to a no start mode in 3 weeks. New batteries in 09, 11 and 13, It has been on a tender since then, I was a slow learner.

Yes I have several tenders. These are all summer only vehicles.
 

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Nightfly
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Battery tenders just make sense. Starting your bike/car once a month and not getting it up to operating temperature and riding/driving it for a bit, you're not doing that vehicle any favors.
 

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Ace Tuner
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I got nine years out of a 'factory activated' type battery that came in one of my bikes that I bought new.
I never used a tender but I did/do put the battery on charge from time to time even If I'm riding the bike almost daily.
That reminds me, gotta go plug in the charger...

BTW, starting and running a bike for a few minutes is not long enough for the battery to fully recover from the drain of start-up.
 

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Battery tenders just make sense. Starting your bike/car once a month and not getting it up to operating temperature and riding/driving it for a bit, you're not doing that vehicle any favors.
I got nine years out of a 'factory activated' type battery that came in one of my bikes that I bought new.
I never used a tender but I did/do put the battery on charge from time to time even If I'm riding the bike almost daily.
That reminds me, gotta go plug in the charger...

BTW, starting and running a bike for a few minutes is not long enough for the battery to fully recover from the drain of start-up.
Yeah, I didn't really want to go there for fear it would get things off course in regard to battery tender use. But y'all are 100% correct.
 
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Nightfly
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Veering off course a little has always been part of the repartee and fun of these forums. I don't see the problem my friend. It certainly is an off-shoot of the main subject and fits the topic well. There isn't a whole lot of discussion concerning the pro vs con, of using a bike tender, left to be said. Those who will use it, will, those who see no need will probably never be convinced. Which was never my intent, don't know about the others...
 

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It is the battery period:wink2:

Plugs in these modern fuel injected engines with unleaded fuel can and do last 50,000 miles or more in bikes.

Mice sometimes get into the intake/ airbox and can cut off enough air to affect the running.

The fuel pump may need to be checked by the dealer.

I once had a brand new BMW motorcycle that ALWAYS had to be plugged into a battery tender or the next time I rode it, it would get maybe 20 miles or so down the road and just DIE. The dealer asked me how often I rode it and I told him that with my job, I sometimes didn't ride for a few weeks at a time and I never had a problem with my JAP bikes???? He said that my new 1987 R65 didn't like short rides or not being plugged in to keep the battery fully charged:surprise:

The bike had less than a thousand miles on it and I sold it the next week.:grin:

Sam:)
 
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