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Everyone seems to be telling me that a 600 is huge for a first bike, but I had one very experienced rider tell me that I should get the biggest [CC] bike I possibly can for my first because I will grow tired of a smaller bike within a week. As long as I am responsible with the throttle, there should be no problem. He also added to practice on a smaller one though before actually riding the bigger one. I'm going to get a sports bike by the way. Any thoughts on this?
 

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Welcome to the forum!

For a good beginning bike, you should look for something that has 2 cylinders rather than 4. Displacement (CCs) does not matter as much as engine configuration and vehicle weight when learning. Kawasaki and Suzuki make several sport models that fit this description. These bikes are all fun to ride and any twin 250CC and over can do highway speeds.

Take a few minutes and read this entire thread:
http://www.gixxer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=151947

It's full of interesting information a new rider should know when choosing a new bike.
 

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I learned on a 1200 cc cruiser, a big difference from a rocket. My Son learned on a ZX-6R, which is a supersport. It can be done, but if you go that route please be careful.
 

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I have also had an experienced rider tell me that it would be boring to get something slow. He suggested the gixxer 6. It just seems it would be overly easy to mess up. I wold really like to have a gixxer 6 in the future but im just ot sure if it will make a good first bike.....
 

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I think a lot of experienced riders who say that are into riding due to the ego boost rather than for the love of riding itself. However, it's probably a lot easier to learn on the biggest bike that Harley makes than to start on a 600cc super sport. The 600cc super sport puts out a HECK of a lot more power than Harley's biggest bike. The V-twin engines in Harley's are also much more friendly to a new rider.
 

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Some riders recommend bigger bikes just to make themselves look badass. I'll probably get flak for that statement but it's true, I've seen it happen in person. Someone asks them for advice and they puff out their chest and go, "Well, I guess if you're a girl anything but the latest race replica is alright, but men like me wouldn't take anything less than a literbike!"
 

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Some riders recommend bigger bikes just to make themselves look badass. I'll probably get flak for that statement but it's true, I've seen it happen in person. Someone asks them for advice and they puff out their chest and go, "Well, I guess if you're a girl anything but the latest race replica is alright, but men like me wouldn't take anything less than a literbike!"
those are the ones I laugh at, it is sooooo funny watching a new rider on a bike that is way too big for them. I saw several this summer, and even left a few of them at the stop lights, with my cruiser :cool:
 

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600 isn't to big for your first bike, I think that is the right size to start.
Honda's, Suzuki's and Kawasaki's all have good cycles with V-twins in that engine range. HD 883 isn't bad either. I would probably stay with a V-twin for your first bike. They're a lot more rider friendly. This just my opinion,....but good luck and I'm not trying to put down anyone else.

Ride Safe
 

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to clarify a little the 600cc bikes he (skooter bum) is talking about (I think) are cruisers, the 600cc sport bikes are not v-twins, they are inline 4's and not the best for a new rider. ;)
 

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Wow call off the dogs then, eh? New riders on 600 cc race reps is a touchy subject for veterans (I'm not a veteran).

If you're talking about cruisers, than I think you can certainly handle 600 cc. It's a totally different experience.

However, I would advise you to steer clear of heavy bikes. The hardest thing for new cruiser riders to learn is how to control their massive bikes at low speeds (such as in a parking lot). Drops are frequent. A lighter bike will be much less cumbersome and much easier to maneuver.

Good luck!
 

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I agree, the cruisers are heavy, my Suzuki Boulevard C50 come in at 542lbs. but they are also well balanced, but on any bike, take it easy in slow conditions.
 

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PassioneDucati,....sorry if I came across the wrong way.

But when someone ask an opinion about a bike, they're going to get a wide array of answers from all the different classes of bikes. And I don't think the answers were meant demean any of the other classes of bikes. It is apparent that the riders who are active in this forum have a deep passion for riding and are just sharing that passion and knowledge.

Ride Safe.
 

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I had one very experienced rider tell me that I should get the biggest [CC] bike I possibly can for my first because I will grow tired of a smaller bike within a week. As long as I am responsible with the throttle, there should be no problem.
Within a week of riding - unless you are Rossi - you are not going to master a bike even if it's a 125cc. You WANT to get bored of a bike - that way you know your capabilities have maxed out the bike's capabilities.

Most riders take a season or two to develop their skills to master a 250-500cc. This means fluid gear shifting, proper emergency swerves and stops, deep leans on turns, etc.

He also added to practice on a smaller one though before actually riding the bigger one. I'm going to get a sports bike by the way. Any thoughts on this?
If not for your friends practice on a smaller bike comment I would say he has a death wish for you.

If you feel very confident after taking your MSF course and don't feel like upgrading - pick up a 500 or 600cc bike. That will give you more than enough power for your first few seasons.

Please do not get an 1100 and kill yourself - I don't want my insurance to go up.
 

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If not for your friends practice on a smaller bike comment I would say he has a death wish for you.
Yes, and if Primalmu were there he would have your pal shot by firing squad.
:D:D:D:D

In all seriousness, I went from a 50cc scooter to a 250cc Ninja, and nearly a
thousand miles into the Ninja I can tell you this: I'll need at least another
year before I go bigger.
The lie is that you will be bored. The truth: No, you won't. take it from a guy who rides a 250. :)
And anything over 500cc is just going to run you more-- 4 or 5 grand instead of $1500-$2500.


Also consider:
in-line 4s are more expensive to insure.
In fact, when I went to check on insurance for bikes, I looked at the GS500
by Suzuki which is a good starter sport. The insurance was $70 a month for sucktastic coverage,
versus the $35 a month I pay now for full, cushy, low-deductible insurance.
So on a supersport, make it a 600cc, and figure in your age and marriage status, and prior record. Even just one ticket, not married, and under 25 and you are the prison queen for the insurance company.

Two links you should check:

good sport bikes to start on:
http://www.sportbikes.net/forums/new-rider-forums/391524-looking-beginner-bike-look-no-further.html

why size matters: :D
http://www.sportbikes.net/forums/new-rider-forums/354478-want-600-read.html
 

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For me a 600 was the only way to go for my first bike. A 250cc bike simply isn't meant for highway driving and to me it's just as dangerous cruising down the highway with the bike shaking as it is to have a bigger bike.

With a bigger first bike, it's all about self-control in my opinion. I don't try to go screaming around turns or drive 100 mph. I take it slow and steady and am responsible.

It's really all on you and what you think you can handle.
 
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