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Hey All,
I'm a 47 yo guy with the coolest wife in the world. She started riding motorcycles 3 years ago. Now she wants me to start also. We still have her first bike, a Virago 250. Here's the problem: I have been an avid bicycle rider for decades now. On and off road, and yes, I still ride. On bicycles, the right side lever is the rear brake, on motorcycles, it is the front brake. This could be a big deal. Any bicycle/motorcycle riders out there who have overcome this potential problem?
I am about to take the basic MSF course, so I'm still not sure about this. Any other dual purpose riders out there?
 

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Chris
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once you get on a motorcycle you will sell your bike within the month!
imagine going 20X faster when you want to without having to sweat over it! and feeling the wind all over you
sounds nice right?
its a dream! if you like bicycles, you will LOVE motorcycles.
switching from a bike to the motorcycles is very easy, don't worry!
 

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I was in your shoes one month ago and have had no problem at all with remembering which brake to use. As has been said so many times on here - go out and practice in a safe environment, such as an empty parking lot, until you feel comfortable controlling the motorcycle. You'll have no trouble adapting after a few hours of practice.

And I fear that gggval is correct. I've wanted a motorcycle for years. Some of my bicycle buddies were also motorcyclists. I've often joked that the only thing stopping me from buying a motorcycle was the suspicion that if I had both, any time that I looked outside and saw a nice day for riding, the thought process would go something like "Hmmm. Do I want to spend the next few hours sweating my @$$ off or cruising through the countryside in the breeze?".

The result? I haven't turned a pedal since I got my motorcycle. :)

Happy trails,
Chris
 

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I have the same opinion as the others. The balance and steering you learned on a bike will help, but the motorcycle is way more fun. I have not sold my bicycles, but they have sure not gotten much use.
 

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i hope that you keep riding your bicycle ... it's a great way to stay fit!!!

don't sweat the small stuff.
you will get used to the change in the controls.
pretty soon you won;t even think about it.

the only time you need to worry - is if your wife wants you to sign a life insurance policy over to her. and right after that ... she challenges you to a street race on your new motorcycle.

Hahahaha !!!!

dT
 

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Hey All,
I'm a 47 yo guy with the coolest wife in the world. She started riding motorcycles 3 years ago. Now she wants me to start also. We still have her first bike, a Virago 250. Here's the problem: I have been an avid bicycle rider for decades now. On and off road, and yes, I still ride. On bicycles, the right side lever is the rear brake, on motorcycles, it is the front brake. This could be a big deal. Any bicycle/motorcycle riders out there who have overcome this potential problem?
I am about to take the basic MSF course, so I'm still not sure about this. Any other dual purpose riders out there?


I actually swapped the brakes on my bike, right side front brake. I do know a lot of riders who use the left front bicycle then transition without problem to the right front brake on the motorcycle. It simply takes a brief period to "shift gears" so to say. Much like going from a left side shift to a right side shift as some of us have done when riding certain bikes with the right hand shift. You probably do some things like this when riding the off road bike vs the road bike. You just develop two distinctly different sets of reactions for each.

Personally I just started riding the bicycle again. Bought a full suspended decent used Haro. Love it. I do the few miles ride to the post office and down town whenever I can. Too short a hop to ride the bike or car when the weather is good. Besides I could use getting into shape more than I am. At the risk of sounding hokey, I find riding the bicycle invigorating. I spin about a 60-70 rpm rate and use the gears - a lot - to keep the spin rate, because that's where I work best. I may be fat and the knees may be ****, but my wind and ability to ride for some time at a decent rate is proving to be very good. I won't be out doing 50-100 miles, but cranking around for an hour or so doing errands is no problem at all.
 

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This site requires you introduce yourself as one of your first few posts so people know you are serious and not a hit and run type poster. Introductions found here ... https://www.motorcycleforum.com/forums/new-member-introductions.305/
How to put the motor on the bike: The motor must be slotted and fastened to the frame, install the new motor chain on the bike. Place an elastic bushing on either side of the bicycle tire, behind the screws, attach a steel washer. Install the drive chain into the system, using the bracket to attach the motor to the frame. Screw the engine into place and screw the spark plug and mount the clutch near the left handlebar, you will have to remove the left handbrake and insert the other end into the engine bar. Take out the screwdriver and slowly tighten the wire Install the accelerator on the right side of the handle. Connect the fuel tank to the carburetor using the hose in the engine kit. Using the bolts included in the bike kit, attach the silencer to the exhaust. To ensure safe travel, try cycling around your neighborhood while doing different maneuvers.
 

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How to put the motor on the bike: The motor must be slotted and fastened to the frame, install the new motor chain on the bike. Place an elastic bushing on either side of the bicycle tire, behind the screws, attach a steel washer. Install the drive chain into the system, using the bracket to attach the motor to the frame. Screw the engine into place and screw the spark plug and mount the clutch near the left handlebar, you will have to remove the left handbrake and insert the other end into the engine bar. Take out the screwdriver and slowly tighten the wire Install the accelerator on the right side of the handle. Connect the fuel tank to the carburetor using the hose in the engine kit. Using the bolts included in the bike kit, attach the silencer to the exhaust. To ensure safe travel, try cycling around your neighborhood while doing different maneuvers.
Too bad this may be deleted since there is no introduction. Been warned so just have to see. Would like further explanation but suspect pure spam.
 

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Sinman,

Shouldn't be problem learning a new process. You do different maneuvers every time in a car and that works out okay. On the bike you should be using a right foot brake at the same time as your right hand brake and thus you will have a completely different motor memory being trained.

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