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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I dropped a new battery in my 2000 Suzuki Intruder 800 early fall and always leave the bike hooked up to the battery tender when not in use. I went into the bike shed this past weekend and heard a faint, intermittent beeping sound. I located it to be coming from the battery area and it stopped and started up again when I disconnected and reconnected the tender. Never heard this beeping before. Any ideas what’s going on? I disconnected the tender before closing up the shed but would like to keep the battery charged over the winter.
 

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The battery should not make any noise. That leaves three other choices. The battery tender, something on the bike, something else in the shed.
Eliminate the bike noise by disconnecting the battery from the bike. Determine the tender noise by listening to it.
If no noise from it, have a dekko / listen around the shed.
Why did Buddy Holley call has band the Crickets?

UK
 

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Have you actually tested the voltage of the battery? I'm wondering if a previous owner installed a turn signal indicator(beeper) but your tender has malfunctioned and you aren't actually keeping the battery charged to full power. And maybe the turn signals have corroded allowing very small amount of voltage to trigger the beeper but just barely. Long shot at best but I'd certainly want to know the state of the battery anyway. I don't know of a tender that has a beeper but there maybe one. When you had the tender disconnected, did the beeping stop? If not then as suggested, disconnect the battery. If it's coming from the bike, with those two things disconnected it can no longer be coming from the bike. Do you have a neighbor that likes to play around with practical jokes?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It's been cold, so I haven't followed up on what the two of you suggested till now...

After being off the battery tender for a week, the battery's voltage is holding steady at 12.6. With the tender hooked up it is 14.4. There are no aftermarket devices installed, the tenders are about four years old and the battery is new as of a few months ago.

The same high pitch noise was observed coming from the battery "area," stronger from the left side of the bike, when hooked up to the tender. I tried making audio and video/audio recordings, but the noise is so faint I don't think you'll be able to hear it. When I disconnect the battery tender, the noise stops, and when I reconnect it, it starts again.... a soft, faint, high pitch hum or beep that lasts several seconds, stops for a second and starts up again.

I switched the tender on my bike with the one on my son's bike. My tender on his bike made no noise. His tender on my bike didn't hum/beep, but instead made a faint bubbling sound (like boiling, but no heat to the touch, so I assume it was electrolisis or something like that in the battery).

Hopefully you'll be able to hear these clips with the volume turned up:

These are with my tender on the bike:
1-video and audio with tender one
2-audio with tender one
And this one is when I switched tenders and put my son's on my bike:
3-audio with tender two

In case the links above are not clickable, you can copy and paste these:
1: tender one video.MOV
2: Tender one.m4a
3:Tender two.m4a

Really curious to hear any guesses about what might be happening.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·

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Well even as poor as my hearing is I could hear it and believe it or not I have heard it before. Problem is I can’t remember where or on what or what caused it. But knowing me I gave it the slap up side the head kind of thing. For some reason I was thinking in my case it was my tender. At least I had one once that cooked a battery but I just can’t remember if the noise came from that tender. The fact the sound changes makes me suspicious. Depending on how many more weeks you think you will have it in storage, I think I would leave it unplugged to be on the safe side. But if it wasn’t in a confined area you may never have noticed it in the first place so there’s that.
 

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Probably just the switching power supply frequency causing something to resonate on the bike. I bet if you put an oscilloscope on the battery, you'd see that frequency. Sounds like around 950 Hz square wave to me. What do you think?:

When I go to buy a used vehicle, I bring my mechanic's stethoscope. It's pretty interesting what you can hear.

I would think that any tender that is capable of actually monitoring the battery, would be switching it's output off and on. Seems like it couldn't check the battery voltage when it's making power.

I don't personally own such a fancy gadget, I've only read about the technology.
 

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If there is 'boiling' from electrolysis, then the water levels will drop in the cell(s) doing it. The whining sound is unusual, but may be the switching rate of the tender. I'd keep a check on water levels, and if any cells are declining, you may have a battery with a manufacturing problem.

Is the tender cable attached directly to the battery, or through the auxiliary terminals of the fuse box?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
It's been a few years since I hooked up the wire for the tender, but I am 95% sure I wired it through the aux terminals.

Good news: Just checked the bike and there's no noise. Fingers crossed it was just the cycling on and off.
 

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Just don't forget to drop the battery several times during the riding season, to keep the water levels up. After a few years of that, I replaced mine with an AGM type - no more top-ups, and it went months overwinter without a tender.
 
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