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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well,
Winter is coming in the North East
so my bike will be in the garage for some months
Now... battery storage. I have been told I must use some device (Battery tender?) connected to my battery in order
to keep it in shape during storage in winter months. My garage is not attached to my house and not well insulated.

My Honda Rebel has a connector for it just behind the seat

Recommendations, please?

Thank you
 

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A Battery Tender, not a trickle charger, will maintain your battery at full charge throughout the winter. You do not have to remove the battery from your bike. If you do not have an outlet in your garage, run an extension cord to your house. Just plug it in and wait until Spring. Some people do more, but here is all I do when winter comes, and I have never had a problem with any bike in the spring when riding season starts up again. I hook the Battery Tender up, add Stabil to a full gas tank (running the engine for 5 minutes after adding the Stabil), stuff rags into the pipes to keep critters from nesting there, and cover the bike. I’ve been doing this for the last 30+ years, and usually all I have to do in the Spring is check tire pressure.
 

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Hello all, been a while since I've posted. I'm in Florida and even thou the riding season is 365 here, my bikes are always on battery maintainers when not being used, which sometimes can be a while. Keeping the battery fully charged with a smart maintainer will extend the life of the battery. I use 2 amp Schumacher battery maintainers, but there are several brands out there that work very well, any of the good ones between 1 to 2 amps max output.
 
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A Battery Tender, not a trickle charger, will maintain your battery at full charge throughout the winter. You do not have to remove the battery from your bike. If you do not have an outlet in your garage, run an extension cord to your house. Just plug it in and wait until Spring. Some people do more, but here is all I do when winter comes, and I have never had a problem with any bike in the spring when riding season starts up again. I hook the Battery Tender up, add Stabil to a full gas tank (running the engine for 5 minutes after adding the Stabil), stuff rags into the pipes to keep critters from nesting there, and cover the bike. I’ve been doing this for the last 30+ years, and usually all I have to do in the Spring is check tire pressure.
You guys are lucky lucky lucky that just adding Sta-Bil to the fuel will keep your machine safe in storage.
Here in the Houston area THAT WILL NEVER EVER WORK because of the pump gas we are forced to use.
We are in what is called a "non attainment area", meaning we pollute the air too much.
Area industry is the cause so of course we get sorry gasoline and lower speed limits as one way to help 'fix' it. :sad: :confused:
Without Sta-Bil in the fuel it only takes about three weeks for fuel to begin breaking down in carburetors, longer with FI.
With Sta-Bil in the fuel your fuel will last a little longer, but not by much.
Down here if you don't ride your bike every two weeks or so you'll be doing a carb job soon, again longer with FI machines.
It may be a fuel evaporation thing...? I'm guessing.
 

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A Battery Tender, not a trickle charger, will maintain your battery at full charge throughout the winter. You do not have to remove the battery from your bike. If you do not have an outlet in your garage, run an extension cord to your house. Just plug it in and wait until Spring. Some people do more, but here is all I do when winter comes, and I have never had a problem with any bike in the spring when riding season starts up again. I hook the Battery Tender up, add Stabil to a full gas tank (running the engine for 5 minutes after adding the Stabil), stuff rags into the pipes to keep critters from nesting there, and cover the bike. I’ve been doing this for the last 30+ years, and usually all I have to do in the Spring is check tire pressure.
And rob yourself of all the excitement when you wake them up in the spring? Haha
 

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You guys are lucky lucky lucky that just adding Sta-Bil to the fuel will keep your machine safe in storage.
Here in the Houston area THAT WILL NEVER EVER WORK because of the pump gas we are forced to use.
We are in what is called a "non attainment area", meaning we pollute the air too much.
Area industry is the cause so of course we get sorry gasoline and lower speed limits as one way to help 'fix' it. :sad: :confused:
Without Sta-Bil in the fuel it only takes about three weeks for fuel to begin breaking down in carburetors, longer with FI.
With Sta-Bil in the fuel your fuel will last a little longer, but not by much.
Down here if you don't ride your bike every two weeks or so you'll be doing a carb job soon, again longer with FI machines.
It may be a fuel evaporation thing...? I'm guessing.
Good thing you rarely see temps below 50 huh?
 

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You guys are lucky lucky lucky that just adding Sta-Bil to the fuel will keep your machine safe in storage.
Here in the Houston area THAT WILL NEVER EVER WORK because of the pump gas we are forced to use.
We are in what is called a "non attainment area", meaning we pollute the air too much.
Area industry is the cause so of course we get sorry gasoline and lower speed limits as one way to help 'fix' it. :sad: :confused:
Without Sta-Bil in the fuel it only takes about three weeks for fuel to begin breaking down in carburetors, longer with FI.
With Sta-Bil in the fuel your fuel will last a little longer, but not by much.
Down here if you don't ride your bike every two weeks or so you'll be doing a carb job soon, again longer with FI machines.
It may be a fuel evaporation thing...? I'm guessing.
Oh, you're one of the cities which has "oxygenated" gasoline. The Federal environmental agency mandates a certain level of an oxygenated compound in the gasoline , you're sort of using a partially burnt gasoline in order to lower emissions. Ethanol (ethyl alcohol or corn alcohol) or MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether) are the most common oxygenated additives. But they do tend to gum up the fuel system fairly easily, especially in areas like carburettor jets or Fuel Injection pintles. I'm not familiar with Sta-bil, but I always used Chevron's Techron gasoline and concentrate to keep carburettors and fuel injection systems clean, Chevron used to sell Techron gasoline treated at a rate to keep your fuel system clean, don't know if it is still available, and then you could use the concentrate at I think a 1:1000 ratio as a clean up boost.

When I was working for the Chevron subsiduary down here in New Zealand we wanted to gain the BMW fuel test certificate. This meant we had to ship 800 Litres/220 US gallons of unleaded, un-additised gasoline to BMW in San Francisco, our additive company would add the additive to the gasoline and BMW would perform the test. They dismantled an engine, weighed and photographed the inlet valves, reassembled the engine in the car and drove it up and down the Californian coast until they used up the gasoline. The problem BMW had encountered was inlet valve deposits from gasoline similar to that Semi-fast has to use. Deposits built up on the back of the inlet valve, this deposit absorbs gasoline during start up, making the fuel mix lean and starting hard. Then when the engine warms up this gasoline evaporates out of the deposit making the mix rich and causing rough running. So they demanded a detergent additised gasoline which passed the BMW fuel test .

Well things didn't actually go to plan, the gasoline arrived on a cargo ship and was unloaded the day before the San Francisco earthquake and went 'missing' for four weeks. Once the fuel was found, it got tested and BMW re-disassembled the engine and weighed the inlet valves again. They found that 3 of the valves had absolutely no weight gain and one had been cleaned up so that it lost 0.01 of a milligram. They'd never seen such good results that they rang the additive company and asked if they were testing some new additive. It turned out that our base gasoline from New Zealand was of such a high standard and naturally oxidation resistant that no deposits had been formed, or formed at such a low level that the additive in the gasoline cleaned up the fuel system and produced the exceptional results that BMW saw.

I kept the display box with the four inlet valves in it from the test as a paper weight on my desk for years, that paper weight - and the BMW certificate saying we'd passed their fuel test - probably cost nearly $US100,000. But we really publicised that our gasoline was the first and only gasoline to pass the BMW fuel test and saw a slight increase in sales. But it was probably the most expensive paper weight in the country.

So bottom line, use a detergent gasoline additive or buy fuel that is already additised. And that Sta-bil you're adding when storing the bikes is probably a good idea.
 

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I too live in an area where they pump air into the fuel and charge us more for it (oxygenated fuel) We used to see it about 6 months of the year. 10% milage loss using this fuel. I think we have it year around now. Our county is right on the bay.


BMW in this area as part of their tune ups has an optional crushed walnut shell flush of your intake system to clean the valves. Other car companies are starting to follow suit.
 

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"Oh, you're one of the cities which has "oxygenated" gasoline." - Quote from Kiwi Steve


Yes, that's the problem. It's not just in the city. Probably about 100+ miles in any direction from Houston.

Rubber parts in the carburetors don't like it either.
 

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Yes, yes it is. :grin:
However, last winter we had temps down to 20 for about a month. That's WAY cold for us. :surprise:
WOW!!! I have heard of cold snaps in the south. In fact, one of the greatest football games I can remember was a bowl game in the south where it snowed a bunch and there was frozen rain and all the players were slipping and sliding all over the place. But I didn't realize that those cold snaps would stick around so long.

Did you still ride some anyway?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank you guys !
What brand would you recommend ? not looking for the cheapest but don't want to pay a fortune also,
affordable sounds better !
 

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Your local battery store or auto parts store should have a battery tender. I usually have about 4 batteries connected to tenders. On my Suzuki I will be plugging the air intake this year. Found evidence of critter activity in the past.
Chevron here has a sign on their pumps ( may contain ethanol ) which is not very helpful.

UK
 

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I'm assuming you have some electricity in your garage, so a battery tender will really help give you a warm fuzzy feeling in spring. If you have a regular lead acid battery (like the ones with the little yellow caps to top its cells up from time to time with distilled [not tap or "filtered"] water), then most any one will do. Harbor Freight frequently has these ones on sale for under $5, or rummage for coupons here. NOTE WELL: If your battery happens to be some sort of ultra-sexy AGM, a Lithium-Ion type or maybe some surplus NASA prototype power unit or something, then its long term health may benefit from a specialized charger to specially suit it.

For folks like me maintaining regular old lead acid batteries in sheds or on boats or wherever "off grid", these little 1½ Watt Solar Panels that also often go on sale for like ten bucks do the trick nicely. They're also handy to lay in the windshield of any cars you might not use all that often, like Aunt Mildred's old '64 T-Bird. If the cigarette lighter's an "always on" type, whether or not the ignition's on, just plug it in with the included adapter, lay the panel under the windshield or elsewhere with lots of sun, and all will be lively when the daffodils bloom or if you need it in the dead of winter. Otherwise, or for bikes, just hook it up with the included jump-start-cable-style alligator clips (red to positive/black to negative), and put or hang that little panel outside in the sun or at a window.

There are a lot of good tips already here, but if this is the original poster's first winter with a bike, and it's a climate where they get REAL winters, where the bike's most sensibly mothballed for several months whilst the wolves howl lamentingly on the glaciers covering the Dairy Queen parking lot, then they'd probably do well to google "winterizing your motorcycle" or similar.
 

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WOW!!! I have heard of cold snaps in the south. In fact, one of the greatest football games I can remember was a bowl game in the south where it snowed a bunch and there was frozen rain and all the players were slipping and sliding all over the place. But I didn't realize that those cold snaps would stick around so long.

Did you still ride some anyway?
Did I still ride some anyway?
Ahhh No.

The older I get, the higher the temp has to be for me to ride.
Funny cause when I was a youngster we'd ride in the ~30's without proper cold weather gear.
Now that I have ALL the gear, I'll park it at 45 degrees or below. Yep, I'm officially a fair weather rider.
We have 100% humidity around here a lot of the time. So that doesn't help in cold-ish weather.

You gotta keep in mind, I ruined my M/C hobby when I made motorcycles my job.
Kinda takes the zeal out of something when it becomes a job. (Don't judge me, it's just the way it is). Lol
 

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I've been using a Battery Tender Plus (the one with the "smart chip") which is good on all batteries including AGM. I have the Battery Tender "pigtail" on my motorcycle, cars and lawn mower batteries so that I can plug my one Battery Tender extension cord to any of them from inside my garage to outside in the driveway. When I know that any of my vehicles will sit for awhile, I just plug it in and forget about it. I just rotate the cord to wherever it is needed. The battery can be hooked up for months or just days at a time. When the charging light goes to solid green, the battery is fully charged. I've been using the same one for over 15 years with no problems. You can get it and any accessories just about anywhere from Amazon to Walmart and they are not expensive. Mine has paid for itself many times over in all the batteries that I've extended the lives on.
 
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