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There are machines but I have had perfect success on about 12 sets of tires with a $50 balancer like this one, smooth as silk up to 120+ mph. This looks just like mine but I got mine on Amazon.
 
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On The Road Again!
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I have been using the balance beads in the tires for the last few years and they work great.
I recently removed an old front tire from the rim after 19,000 miles with the beads.
Here is the picture I took. There is NO dust to indicate that the beads were wearing out. There are a few little balls of rubber in there, and the inside of that tire was polished as smooth as a baby's hiney.
19,000 miles with no trouble and it ran smooth as silk 'til the day it was removed from the bike.
The new tire has the beads in it, ready to go back on the Goldwing.
Automotive tire Tread Synthetic rubber Tire Automotive lighting
 

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A lot of people use the beads, obviously they work, but I like using weights. A box of them is $20 and it's probably a lifetime supply, especially because I had to buy 2 boxes after I committed the great sin of using a silver weight on my wife's black rim..
 
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Zip
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I have committed the greatest of sins, I do not balance them at all. That said I ride pretty much the speed limit or barely over and I haven't done interstate riding for a few years now.
So your tires are not exactly unbalanced. Rather, they are balanced correctly for their intended purpose. :)
 

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CB125T, EX250 commuter, Ninja 250 racebike, VF500F, CBR600RR, VFR750F
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I've developed procedure similar to Randall that results in +150mph smoothness and can deal with unmarked tyres like Avon & Michelin. Uses minimal amount of weights to get perfect balance. I've even taken freshly balanced wheels from machines and applied my process to same tyre and wheel to reduce weights needed by 1/2 or even none.

Here's some assumptions that causes problems:

1. lightest spot on tyre is yellow/red dot. Nope! I've found that +50% of tyres are improperly marked. They are after all, applied by humans.

2. heavy spot on wheel is always at valve-stem. Nope! In fact, some are opposite.

Automatically lining up yellow/red dot at valve-stem on this wheel would stack heavy spots on both and require massive amounts of weights to balance. I use balancer like that Black Widow model shown above. But with built-in bubble-level so I can make sure balancer is perfectly flat. My method works by placing heavy spot of tyre exactly opposite of heavy spot of wheel so they cancel each other out.

1. balance bare wheel 1st. Very few wheels are heaviest exactly at valve-stem. Many are off by 20-30 degrees and some are exactly 180-degrees off. Spin both ways to verify. Mark location on bottom as heaviest spot on wheel. Add weight to opposite side of wheel so it's perfectly balanced by itself.

2. install tyre any which way and find imbalance. I always ignore yellow/red dot, they've let me down way, way too many times. Spin in both directions to verify and mark top as lightest spot on tyre. Since wheel was already balanced beforehand, we know that this is truly lightest spot on tyre (most of time, won't line up with yellow/red dot).

3. reinstall tyre lining up real lightest spot with real heaviest spot on wheel! Break tyre beads off rim, take off one bead from wheel and remove weights from rim. Now that's I've measured and marked both wheel and tyre, I can rotate tyre and line up its actual lightest spot with actual heaviest spot on wheel!!!

4. Pump up and balance final assembly. Will result in least amount of weight needed for combo. Often no weights needed at all!

This process has always resulted in less weight and better balance than anything else I've tried. No one has been able to bring in freshly-balanced wheel+tyre that I couldn't reduce weight used with this method. Sure, perfect balance in end may be same, but combo stays in balance better with mileage and wear. Often completely wearing out tyres with no re-balancing needed.
 

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Jack stands and a piece of copper pipe has worked well for me for multiple sets of tires and runs up to 140 mph or so...
 
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