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ZAMM Fanatic
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2,732 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My last pair of flat tires cost me at least $300, if not $500 apiece to get back on the road again.

That includes the cost of towing, replacement tires, mount & balance, overnight motel stays, meals, ...



I've been trying ever since my FIRST flat tire to be better prepared and able to get back underway faster and cheaper. Here's how:

(Mind you, SOME of the expenses are unavoidable unless you care to ride on a plugged tire)

For starters,

A) Mini-compressor, tire plug kit, SLIME...and be sure you actualy have a place/way/cigarette lighter jack to plug it into!

B) AAA "Premier" Insurance which covers RV's and motorcycles. $150/yr. I found out on the side of the road BOTH of the policies I THOUGHT covered my bike would not cover A) Motorcycles or B) Towing beyond a few miles.

C) A friend with a pickup,, or a MC trailer, able to "rescue" you when you flat locally, should you be unable to effect a roadside repair. You can rent a U-haul trailer for about $30, but you'll need tiedown straps, and one of those handlebar ..things. Loading into a pickup truck is tricky, at best.

D) Tires. A set of replacement tires for your bike. Boxed up in such fashion that NO ONE can tell there's a tire inside the box, because FEDX and others will not OVERNIGHT, AIR FREIGHT it if they know it's a tire. Unless you prefer to wait several days for ground delivery.

E) It may be if you ride a popular HD you can roll into any shop in America and they'll have the tire for your bike. Ride a scooter, a crotch rocket, or be particular about which tire you want, and....of course, tires are a LOT cheaper from Superstore.

F) Tire spoons? I don't know many riders who actually do the physical change of the tire itself, instead finding a motorcycle shop to do it and balance the assembly. But you at least need

G) The tools necessary to REMOVE the tire from the bike. Unless you like borrowing tools, or paying some bottom-level tech at the shop to do it. Oh gee, I wonder why there's no anti-seize on these swingarm bolts.... no locktite on anything, why it was (apparently) put on with an impact wrench, why that MORON re-used a beat up cotter pin instead of putting in a new one (for all of twelve cents)...

H) The knowledge and expertise to actually change your tire. If you've never done it before, the side of the road is NOT the place to "learn." Mistakes can be costly.

What about just plugging it on the bike, pumping it up and going? Sometimes you'll get lucky, the plug will seal, and you can simply ride to your favorite shop and be done. Other times...everything will go wrong. Having a "Plan B" is essential when you're in Woodward Oklahoma, and the first words you hear are

"We don't work on scooters. We ain't got that size tire. And we don't plug tires."

Cheers~!
 

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3,162 Posts
What size are those tires? It almost appears that you could haul one on your scoot. For me, the Motion pro tire iron[ the big 16"] is the one that gets things done. http://www.motorcycle-superstore.com/4456/i/motion-pro-assorted-tire-iron-set. I already have one, but am considering having two to make tire changing a pleasure.

I totally agree on practicing changing a tire when you are not in a need to situation. I use a mild penetrating oil when changing them out. Save the old tire and get it patched inside with a vulcanized patch and that is your spare. I had a guy put one on my lawn mower tire last week and he used Napa tire cement and after sanding down to rubber applied the cement and set it on fire. Old school guy who knows his stuff.
 

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Flat Tire and Towing Suggestion

My last flat tire I was able to get home since my sidewalls are pretty stiff. Added slime, pumped up and lasted two months right before end of season (winter) and then replaced tube. Big nail in tube tire. Slime is a good product.

I have AAA recreational vehicles card since state farm does not tow motorcycles and even cars they will only tow to nearest repair shop. Worth the money. Keep in mind tell AAA you must have flat bed and the necessary equipment to hold MC in place otherwise tell them to find another. I have found found four towers I know along my drive that are equipped and accept AAA.

I do not understand comment about AAA not covering motorcycles. It does. I had mine towed recently for 30 miles to home due to dead battery.
 

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My last flat tire I was able to get home since my sidewalls are pretty stiff. Added slime, pumped up and lasted two months right before end of season (winter) and then replaced tube. Big nail in tube tire. Slime is a good product.

I have AAA recreational vehicles card since state farm does not tow motorcycles and even cars they will only tow to nearest repair shop. Worth the money. Keep in mind tell AAA you must have flat bed and the necessary equipment to hold MC in place otherwise tell them to find another. I have found found four towers I know along my drive that are equipped and accept AAA.

I do not understand comment about AAA not covering motorcycles. It does. I had mine towed recently for 30 miles to home due to dead battery.
I didnt know Slime would work in a tubed tire?
 

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American Legion Rider
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18,538 Posts
Slime won't work in a tubed tire. At least not very long. But Ride-On will. So they claim. Don't have much to lose in trying it. I like it just for the balancing of the wheel part. Stopping a leak is a side benefit if it works.
 
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