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Discussion Starter #1
Was just wondering how long folks keep their bikes, on average. It can be your daily rider, a stable, a collection of antiques.

I seem to be on a two year plan and only have one at a time.

What say you?
 

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American Legion Rider
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When I rode every day rain or shine in Cali, it's was every three years. Now that I'm retired, this is my third year and the bug is nibbling at me. Plan was ten years. Don't know that I'll make it but the bank might just force it that way.:D
 

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Charlie Tango Xray
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The Hondas I've bought new, ten years on average. This one I plan to keep till the wheels fall off. Other brands, not so long, three maybe four years. And the ones I buy off Craigslist to save from a tarp death come and go after I get them running.
 

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First Honda: totalled after 14 months
Second Honda: stolen after 18 months
Third Honda: stolen after 8 months
Fourth Honda: sold after two years
Fifth Honda: sold after three years

First Suzuki (sixth bike overall): 2,100 miles in less than two months, so far

Over 43,000 miles (combined) on six bikes. Only totalled one! :)

Only two ER visits total. First ER visit when I totalled first bike was ugly. Second time someone turned in front of me, went road surfing at about 15-20 mph, stitches in knee was about it.
 

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Gone.
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Lessee....I have one that I've had for about 18 years and one for about 10 years. No plans to get rid of either one.

I have another that's almost 60 years old, but I've only had it for about 3, and plan on getting rid of it in another 5 years or maybe sooner if I get a good offer.
 
G

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I do worry about getting my future bike stolen. I know this is prob a stupid question but what are some preventive methods for that? They seem far easier to take than a car.

Are there any brands that have reputations for being the longest lasting bikes?

Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk
 

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Troublemaker
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2,517 Posts
I keep them 12 to 18 months. The only one I kept longer is the old 360, it's nostalgia for me, what I grew up with, just not the one I have.

After they get to 40,000 miles, I think I have done my time on it and let someone else have it.
 

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MODERATOR
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I like shiny new toys and so I average a new bike about every 2 years or sometime before I have to buy new tires as it's easier just to get a new bike:biggrin: There was about a 12 year period where I had on average about 4 new bikes always enjoying the comfort of my garage! It's tough but but someone has to do it!

Sam:biggrin:
 

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Premium Member
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Hmm...
I kept my first bike, a '65 Honda S90, from '68 until a few years ago, when I gave it to a good independent shop owner. My '67 305 Super Hawk was only mine for a couple years, from '70 until '72, when I sold it to a college friend. I bought my mostly '70 CB450 in '77, and still ride it, my '05 VS800 in '07, still riding that, too, and my '98 Valkyrie last April. Average time of ownership? May not be a valid number for me.
 

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I've had everything you listed except for the S90 and the CB450 but I'd have liked to have owned them. Both were very nice bikes.

Sam:biggrin:
 

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I do worry about getting my future bike stolen. I know this is prob a stupid question but what are some preventive methods for that? They seem far easier to take than a car.

Are there any brands that have reputations for being the longest lasting bikes?

Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk
The key to motorcycle anti-theft is layering of methods. The first is obviously to use the fork lock.

After that you've got disc locks. There's ones with alarms if the bike is moved. If you get one for each wheel, it's better to get two different brands. That lessens the chance that someone who wants to steal your bike will know how to defeat the lock.

A plain cover with no brand logos helps. That way the would-be-thief has to come up and check under it just to see if your bike is even worth stealing.

There's alarms you can install on your bike.

A good chain with a good, non-standard-brand lock to chain the bike to something solid will prevent people from just lifting it in the back of a truck or van. Make sure not to leave slack. Slack makes it easier to break a chain.

Park the bike in a high-traffic area when you go somewhere in order to prevent thieves from working in secrecy. Don't park the bike on the road outside your home.

You can also do things to the bike. Add a secret kill switch. Remove the clutch lever, things like that.

The purpose isn't to make your bike unstealable, because that's not going to happen. The point is to make your bike so inconvenient and time-consuming to steal that it's not worth bothering. The more layers of protection you use, the more they have to work for it.

New sport bikes 600 and up are stolen most often.
 
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The key to motorcycle anti-theft is layering of methods. The first is obviously to use the fork lock.

After that you've got disc locks. There's ones with alarms if the bike is moved. If you get one for each wheel, it's better to get two different brands. That lessens the chance that someone who wants to steal your bike will know how to defeat the lock.

A plain cover with no brand logos helps. That way the would-be-thief has to come up and check under it just to see if your bike is even worth stealing.

There's alarms you can install on your bike.

A good chain with a good, non-standard-brand lock to chain the bike to something solid will prevent people from just lifting it in the back of a truck or van. Make sure not to leave slack. Slack makes it easier to break a chain.

Park the bike in a high-traffic area when you go somewhere in order to prevent thieves from working in secrecy. Don't park the bike on the road outside your home.

You can also do things to the bike. Add a secret kill switch. Remove the clutch lever, things like that.

The purpose isn't to make your bike unstealable, because that's not going to happen. The point is to make your bike so inconvenient and time-consuming to steal that it's not worth bothering. The more layers of protection you use, the more they have to work for it.

New sport bikes 600 and up are stolen most often.
Thank you so much. This is incredibly helpful!

Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk
 

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American Legion Rider
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Or don't own one to begin with. Problem solved.:D
 

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A legend in his own mind
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The bikes I've actually OWNED, First one -81 Maxim 650- about a year n a half, I got it on a trade and later traded it away, about a week later two of the four carbs started flowing gas like a pump.
Second -03 V-Star 1100- still have going on 11? years now.
And the Third -83 KZ 1100 Spectre- about three years and still a work in progress as time and money allow
 

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If you do modify your bike (extra kill switch, installed alarm system, etc) be sure to do it RIGHT! I bought a used vehicle with an extra "anti-theft kill switch" installed by the owner and it caused me lots of problems because he didn't know what he was doing. I ended up having to pay someone to uninstall it and clean up the mess that he made!
The key to motorcycle anti-theft is layering of methods. The first is obviously to use the fork lock.

After that you've got disc locks. There's ones with alarms if the bike is moved. If you get one for each wheel, it's better to get two different brands. That lessens the chance that someone who wants to steal your bike will know how to defeat the lock.

A plain cover with no brand logos helps. That way the would-be-thief has to come up and check under it just to see if your bike is even worth stealing.

There's alarms you can install on your bike.

A good chain with a good, non-standard-brand lock to chain the bike to something solid will prevent people from just lifting it in the back of a truck or van. Make sure not to leave slack. Slack makes it easier to break a chain.

Park the bike in a high-traffic area when you go somewhere in order to prevent thieves from working in secrecy. Don't park the bike on the road outside your home.

You can also do things to the bike. Add a secret kill switch. Remove the clutch lever, things like that.

The purpose isn't to make your bike unstealable, because that's not going to happen. The point is to make your bike so inconvenient and time-consuming to steal that it's not worth bothering. The more layers of protection you use, the more they have to work for it.

New sport bikes 600 and up are stolen most often.
 

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I'm 67, started riding at 60, on my fourth bike.

So, on average I get a new (always pre-used) bike about every 2 years.

But I moved up from my 250 cc learner cruiser to my first M50 after 20 months/24,000 km/15,000 miles as a natural progression. Then I had my first Suzuki M50 for about 2 years, my Honda ST1100 for just over 2 years, and I've had my second Suzuki M50 for about 3 months.

By the way Porky, Wintersol's '05 VS800 would have been an S50 wouldn't it? 50 cu inch = 805 cc. VZ800 = M50, VL800 = C50. The 90 series of Boulevards are about 1500 cc and the 109 series are about 1800 cc.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Good to know most of us are on a two year or longer plan.

I'm trying to convince myself to stay out of the dealerships for a while. Mine's only two months old...
 

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MODERATOR
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Steve, you are correct on the CC's.

The M50, a great mid size, all around bike was once called the Suzuki Volusia and I had one all decked out in 2003. It is a real bargain.

Sam:biggrin:
 

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Most of my bikes have been kept five years or so, only two have been short terms of a year or less. The first was a Harley 90cc trail bike that was terrible, the second was a Husqvarna that I bought after almost twenty years away from owning a bike. The reason I only kept the Husqvarna SM610 for around six months was I intended to only ride locally on mostly back roads but ended up riding much longer distances at highway speeds and wanted something better suited to that type of riding.
 

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By the way Porky, Wintersol's '05 VS800 would have been an S50 wouldn't it? 50 cu inch = 805 cc. VZ800 = M50, VL800 = C50. The 90 series of Boulevards are about 1500 cc and the 109 series are about 1800 cc.
You are correct - the bike's designation is Boulevard S50, before that, they were the Intruder vs800, but the actual model number is VS800GL for the '05. For years, the state thought it was 50cc, until I marked through the S50 model name and changed it to VS800. Even the insurance company was confused.
 
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