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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Mine seem to be completely drained of oil, and I'm betting the springs have lost a lot of strength too. Is there any way I can change out the seal on the shocks and refill the oil? What about hardening the springs? Any other bikes with shocks that fit on one of these?
 

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Motorbike Macgyver
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Sometimes a seal can leak just from being excessively dirty. I had this happen to my k10 forks. I had to figure out how to disassemble them by Googling so I could remove the lower fork seals, cleaned them real good, cleaned the fork legs and reassembled. Put the whole front end together, filled forks with oil, squeezed the front brake and pushed down on the handlebars hard and fast several times. Then took a paper towel and dabbed around the fork lowers where they'd been leaking. No more oil and have not had a problem with them since. As far as the springs are concerned, unless they are very badly rusted they should not have lost any strength, that simply doesn't happen, the springs are tempered and would only lose their temper through excessive heat or wear. The springs may be a little soft to begin with, the k10 fork springs are. But the springs are really just there to assist the travel action, the hydraulic cylinders actually do most of the work. The best thing to do is take the forks completely apart, clean them out thoroughly, use solvent if necessary and let sit to dry if solvent has been used. When you are ready to put them back together, fill with oil to the level recommended in the owners manual. Test the forks for leaks and to see how comfortable you are with the amount of travel. If there is too much travel, add another half ounce of oil to each fork leg and test again. When you're sure there are no leaks and the fork has the right amount of travel for you, you're good. Now obviously if you find anything broken or damaged when you take them apart, you'll need to replace it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So you can top off the oil in a CT90 K0 leading link shock? everything I've read says you have to replace the cylinder
 

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Motorbike Macgyver
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Ahh, now I see. I had to look up a leading link and realize now why they can't be filled. I suppose you have two options. One is to replace the cylinders if you can find them, the other is to switch to telescopic forks. With switching to telescopic, I don't know what forks specifically will fit your bike but I do know how you can find out. You need to know what type of headset you have, I'm guessing conical bearings with this being an older bike, which means threaded steerer tube, but could be wrong. The other important factors to know are steerer tube diameter and length. You may be able to fit a steerer tube that is a bit longer than yours, but not shorter. If no one else here knows what specific forks might fit your bike, you can always take your forks off and measure the steerer tube length and diameter, then maybe visit some local salvage yards and you just might get lucky.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I haven't been able to find new or rebuilt cylinders, but I was considering getting C70 front shocks just to see how they would fit. They definitely wouldn't have the same travel as a CT shock, but they're readily available and just about anything would be better than what I've got. It nearly bottoms out when I sit on it. What about the rear shock, could I refill them? I've got two spares to play around on that don't return, I was thinking I might be able to drill a hole in the bottom, tap it, and stick a plug in it.

Sorry I'm asking so many questions, I've never messed with shocks much, so I don't know much about what to do with them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I went ahead and got a pair of C70 front shocks just to try them out, they're off of dratv. The everything fit except for the bracket that bolts up to the arm. It was just a little too wide, but nothing a small washer couldn't handle. The bike rides a whole lot better with those shocks than the ones I had. No bottoming out, even of rough dirt roads. Haven't been on anything too rough, but I'm betting they'll handle fine.

The cylinders telescope about an inch farther than the springs on the old shocks, and there was no return at all.
 
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