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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Several questions:

1. Is it better to wait for a while after you apply the choke till the gasoline evaporates, rather than press the start button right after applying the choke?

2. Is it suggested to roll the throttle a little bit when hitting the start button, or don't apply the throttle at all?

3. Right after you start the bike and in some way it stops, is it better to wait for a while so that you can get enough gasoline evaporated to restart the bike again?

4. Can I keep the choke applied after I park the bike, so I can start the bike easily next cold morning?

Thanks!
 

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Fire it up.

Full choke, fuel on, key on, hit the button no throttle. Putter putter for a little bit depending on how cold. Squeeze the throttle gently, if the motor picks up revs okay, clunk in first and take off.
Putter down the road, move choke about half way back after maybe a mile, and all the way back after about two miles. Again depending on temperature.
When you get home turn off the key, and the gas if required and park it.

No need to leave the choke in any position than the normal riding mode. When starting there is no need to delay, because no gas is doing anything until you hit the start button.

CV carbs do not need any throttle. That will delay starting, and or prevent starting.
Even on the older style carbs no more than a tiny squeeze was required.
Jerking the throttle open while kick starting a bike, is a good way to get some leg exercise, and have no engine sounds.

Unkle Crusty*
 

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You don't have to wait for "gasoline to evaporate" - it does that the instant it passes through the carburetor or fuel injector.

Every bike has its own characteristics on cold start and you need to learn what your bike prefers but as a general policy it is good to let the engine warm up a bit before hitting the road and asking for power. That gives the oil a chance to get everything lubed before you go.
 

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--

My experience with identical bikes is that each starts in different ways. One starts better with no throttle, the other with about 1/4 throttle. Neither needs choke (actually an enricher) for more than getting started and moving a half block. I never let the bike just sit for awhile idling to warm up. I always take off immediately after starting. After even barely warming up, neither needs either enricher or throttle to restart.

My point is that you may need to try different ways and remember how your bike functions best. I question those who say it's necessary to keep the enricher on for a mile or two. And how yours starts in warm summer may be completely different than in winter.

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Ace Tuner
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Like others have said, the choke does nothing till starting the bike and every bike has it's own starting procedure.
In warm weather my bike only needs a touch of choke to start, then I 'feather' the choke a few times during warm up.
In cold weather more is needed. I never pull away before the choke can be turned off.
In my opinion any motor needs at least a short warm up.

Does it need any throttle when starting? Some yes, some no. You'll have to find out what your bike likes.

If the motor has some warmth in it, no choke is needed or should be used.
The bike can be restarted as soon as it is turned off, no reason to wait.
 

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On a bike with a carburetor apply the choke and open the fuel valve. Give it a couple of seconds for the carburetor to fill if the fuel has been shut off for a while. Start the bike with zero throttle.
A choke basically shuts off most of the air in front of the fuel jets in your carburetor which makes the fuel mixture rich. Opening the throttle defeats that strategy. Fuel injected bikes are entirely different but a choke implies a carburetor is present.
You will want that rich mix for a while until the engine warms up so doing something like Uncle Crusty suggested makes sense. I never took quite that long to get rid of my choke but I let my bike idle a few minutes before I drove off so we each may be getting about the same result, just using different approaches to warming the engine.
 

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Most modern motorcycles have an enrichener instead of a real choke. We still call it a choke for simplicity.

With an enrichener, the fuel mixture is made rich, meaning more fuel is added to the mixture. As mentioned above, opening the throttle negates this effect because the throttle actually only opens the main air passage. It doesn't directly add fuel.
 
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