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I rode a Triumph, BSA, and Norton. Have owned all three. My dad rode a Norton. I had the fastest Norton in these parts, and can prove it. Their resurrection is not going as well as Triumphs. Moto2 is running Triumph engines.

Norton made a primary chain case cover in 1934 that leaked oil. It was still leaking oil in 1968. Norton designed a twin cylinder engine in the late fourties. The basic design was still being used in the seventies. They contracted Cosworth to make an engine, which they did. But after Norton interfered with it, it was no good.

Early BSA and Triumph did similar silly things. My 68 350cc Kawasaki, was as fast as a 650 Norton and Triumph.

I would want a lot more details on the engine in the bike in the links.

UK
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Norton made a primary chain case cover in 1934 that leaked oil. It was still leaking oil in 1968...
Had to laugh... yep, you could often tell Norton riders, their left boot was oily from the instep to toe -- still have an old pair that I finally retired about 6-8 years ago... oily left boot...

But I loved my Nortons (P11 and Commandos) -- had lots of bikes since, mostly all good, but antiseptically sterile by comparison and I don't recall any that spoke to me quite the same...

-- Larry
 

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Had to laugh... yep, you could often tell Norton riders, their left boot was oily from the instep to toe -- still have an old pair that I finally retired about 6-8 years ago... oily left boot...

But I loved my Nortons (P11 and Commandos) -- had lots of bikes since, mostly all good, but antiseptically sterile by comparison and I don't recall any that spoke to me quite the same...

-- Larry
An oil slide is like no other.
Many of the problems have cures. The newer Commando chain case cover, the triplex chain, and the clutch, can be fitted to the earlier models. A belt drive is also available. So is a short stroke crank system. The piston speed was too great with the long stroke motor. Others fixed the vibration with counter balancers, and 180 or 270 degree cranks. Norton mounted the engine is spongy rubber.
The Cosworth motor had a 270 degree crank, but Norton informed them, that is not the way to do it. Best to have a 360 crank and loads of mass creating an imbalance. The newer forks and disc brake can also go on an earlier model. I did all this on a 68 Dunstall.
A 500 Suzuki swing arm and rear wheel can go on. The steel balls in the steering head from a CB750 fit, and a CB750 master cylinder for the front brake works great.

A 650 in a Featherbed frame would be nice. A good old classic. We get several Nortons at the Sunday bike gang meetings.

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I rode a Norton once, in 1983, a Commando, but at $850 it was too much money for me to come up with at the time. One dollar per cc was the rule of thumb then, for a good bike at a good price. I ended up with a Honda 450 Twin. The Norton was more impressive and clearly had more power, but the Honda was surprisingly capable, and clearly emulated the geometry of the Brit. bikes.

There's a Norton Owners Club here in chicago that is quite active. A nice bunch of bikes, I mean guys...., and they are quite active. You can find them on facebook and at CNOC dot org.
 
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