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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yesterday I took a ride to Virginia to buy cigarettes making a couple local stops first. First stop at an ATM after about six miles, shut off the bike for around five minutes, second stop for lunch about twenty minutes right next to the first stop then around five miles to stop for gas. The rest of the way only stopping for stop signs or traffic lights until going a couple miles beyond the bridge over the Potomac River to the store about forty five miles from home. I saw that on the way back across the bridge traffic was backed up, stop and go for over a mile from the bridge. After stopping for fifteen minutes started back to take my place in the two lane line heading to the bridge, after around ten minutes of very slow going without much stopping the heat coming off the exhaust started to burn my right thigh so bad I had to pull off on a turn lane and stop for about five minutes. After having the engine shut off for that short time got back on and getting back in line it didn't get that hot again. There wasn't any warning light on the speedometer that it was overheating, the ambient temperature was in the mid to upper eighties and sunny. The bike is a Harley XR1200 with a Termignoni exhaust that has been tuned by the Harley dealer, I did have to take it back because it wasn't running right, seeming to be running very rich but since then it has seemed to be running right. As an air/oil cooled engine it has got a little hot at stops before but never that hot, anybody else had that happen?
 

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Could be you had a little cross breeze blow what heat is there right into your leg. As opposed to other days that it may have been a head on wind or tail wind(breeze). Doesn't take much to show you just how hot those engines get. So I would chock it up to circumstances. I had to add XIED's to make mine run richer. The Stage 1 maps just wasn't doing it well enough for my liking. Which makes me wonder just how lean did they get you. To me too rich would be good considering they have these things so darn lean now due to EPA requirements.
 

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If you only run the engine when you can move forward, my bet is you will have no real trouble. I spent a full hour in basically stopped traffic due to construction on a bridge at St. Louis across the Mississippi. I ran the engine only when there was a chance to move forward under power. The engine spent much of the time shut off. I owned that bike for another 10000 miles and never saw anything bad come of it. The HD engines have their faults but being shut down for short periods does not seem to be one of them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
I had another Termignoni exhaust on the bike that had also been tuned by the same dealer, they have had a turnover in the shop since then. The reason for the new exhaust was a crash last year, the new exhaust was also tuned on the dyno using the same "super tuner" sold by Harley as the first exhaust. While I had been in traffic before and felt heat coming off the engine but it was nowhere near what this was. The service manager has shown me a chart that showed the other exhaust had been tuned lean and the new one has been tuned properly at around fourteen percent fuel/air ratio(as I recall). As I say this had never happened before, my question is has anyone else ever had that happen with their Harley or any other bike? Why did it only take a few minutes of being shut off for the heat to dissipate? Could it have been just a computer glitch?
 

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It could have been a glitch, yes. It could also have been an intermittent loose wire to an injector or from a sensor. A temporary clog in the fuel filter or injector from crud in the gas could also cause that to happen.

I think the first thing I'd do is check for any stored DTC's.
 

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Love the Harley XR1200 and if it had a larger gas tank I would have bought one long ago!

My advice may not be applicable because if I remember correctly, your scoot comes stock with an oil cooler-right? If not see my next paragraph.

My Electra Glide that I bought new in 1991 didn't come with an oil cooler. I decided to buy the biggest and best touring cooler that Harley had and put it on. My friend did the same on his 1992 FXR. Both of our bikes were Dyno winners producing 2.5 times the stock HP of an EVO engine to the rear wheel so I knew as a builder that a cooler would be a nice addition although my bike nor his ever overheated even in Sunny Southern California.

On a 100 degree+ beautiful July afternoon a bunch of us left my house to ride up into the neighboring mountains that were quite steep, curvy and approximately 20 miles to our lunch destination.

After we parked the bikes and stood there for a while, a few of the guy's noticed that I had a big oil cooler on my bike and they said they doubted that they did any good. I was the only one that had an oil dipstick with the thermometer in it so I humored them but had them check out the temperature of my oil. Mine was if I remember correctly about 210 degrees.

I wiped it off, waited maybe 5 minutes and put it into the doubters oil tank on his Heritage Soft tail classic and the results very interesting. His oil was at 275 degrees.

We checked a few other bikes and they were all just about the same.

Next ride, almost all in our group had oil coolers on their scoots.:biggrin:

Of course we all know that fuel injected bikes run leaner and hotter and that aftermarket exhaust systems are normally much thinner and hotter.

Sam:coffeescreen:
 
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