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Funny, the older I get, the more important comfort is.

The "BUTT" test is very important: Every butt feels fine when sitting on most any bike in the air conditioned comfort of the dealers showroom but how will it be in stop and go traffic, in Arkansas, in August when it's 105 degrees and 3,000% humidity?

A persons legs can only be in the 'jockey' position for so long unless you are a 4ft-10in, 90 lb Japanese person like some of these bikes are designed for but a large citizen needs leg room.

I've had a few bikes with terrible ergonomics and solid oak seats, with pegs so high that my knees were in my chest but they were okay for a short commute, like 25-50 miles or so but a person could almost commute around the world in comfort on a Goldwing!

Sam:coffeescreen:
 

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That brings up a question that's been on my mind. What sport bikes are known for being more comfortable? Oxymoron, I know, but I like sport bikes and I like being able to feel my legs when I get done with a ride. I'm fairly tall at 6'-0".
 

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Never tried this bike myself, but my brother rides an FLH and for his sport bike, he rides a 2005 Hayabusa and he loves it! He's 6'2" and around 250lbs.
 

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Hayabusas are freaking awesome. I love the way they look for both speed and comfort, but that's way more power than I'm comfortable handling. I'd prefer a 600 or maybe a 750 if the legroom is nice. Liter bikes and up are out though.
 

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I found it interesting that in the article, there was a statement like THIS one, "Victory not only excelled in owner satisfaction, but the company had a strong showing with reliability—putting it almost on par with leading Japanese brands."

What it SEEMS to be saying, is that Victory is "catching up" to the Japanese brands, but still running behind (at least in terms of reliability).

-Soupy
 

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Swamp Rat Rider
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Not Surprised Victory was ranked #1 in Satisfaction .. I don't think they will ever be a Big Seller, but as long as can deliver the quality and an enjoyable ride think will do well just being what they are .. A Fine Refined Machine with enough loyalty to Make a Profitable Business ..
 

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My two most important factors were cost, since I had just got my license and didn't want to spend a lot of money before deciding I liked it. Secondly, I wanted something easy to ride. For those reasons I bought a TU250x, which I like a lot. It's a lot of fun to drive, though I wouldn't say it's comfortable. I like that the pegs are where the seat meets the tank. I wouldn't want them under my butt. I wouldn't say the seat is like plank, but after an hour or so, it's time to get off for a break. I may look into one of those Air Hawk cushions soon.

I think comfort will be much higher up the list for my next bike. I'm not so sure feet forward is the best fit for me. Maybe mid controls might be a better idea, something like the Shadow RS. I think it'll be a few more years until I'm ready to upgrade, so I've got time to mull it over.
 

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I honestly believe the longer Victory is around and the more the die hards are forced to see the reliability, the more they are going to grow. Especially if they would tone back the space age look. I have yet to try one but I promise I will and I'm not brand loyal. So just in case the saying, "don't ride one unless you are ready to buy one" is fact, I won't be trying until I have the cash. I'd hate to try and like and not be able to trade on the spot or purchase on the spot.:) I could handle a total of 3 bikes.:D
 

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For the mature motorcycle rider you would think reliability and comfort would always top the list.

With that in mind I have always wondered why the OEM would not put their best foot forward and offer the very best seat they could?

I know after market seats can be high $, but to the OEM they could mass produce and bring the cost down, and give their product a much better first time perception.

To the buyer that first 10 seconds in the saddle sets the tone. You may not decide its the one for you, but it may very well tell you it is NOT the one for you.

That may very well be a good poll, I am not faulting its result. But for a poll like that to be most productive you need to take it after one or two years of ownership. The minute you walk off the sales floor with your new purchase, you better love it. :biggrin:
 

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I'm in agreement about the "look" of the Victory, to the extent that I want to see them tone done the space age appearance and give it a more classic cruiser style. The "arrow" aspect of the body, turns me off. I get the aerodynamic logic and that they are intentionally creating what they would call uniqueness, but it (imho) is limiting their Sales.

-Soupy
 

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For the mature motorcycle rider you would think reliability and comfort would always top the list.

With that in mind I have always wondered why the OEM would not put their best foot forward and offer the very best seat they could?

I know after market seats can be high $, but to the OEM they could mass produce and bring the cost down, and give their product a much better first time perception.

To the buyer that first 10 seconds in the saddle sets the tone. You may not decide its the one for you, but it may very well tell you it is NOT the one for you.

That may very well be a good poll, I am not faulting its result. But for a poll like that to be most productive you need to take it after one or two years of ownership. The minute you walk off the sales floor with your new purchase, you better love it. :biggrin:
This^^^^^^^^^

I really like the ergos of the CB750, and the seat is still comfortable, even on a 35 year old bike. Honda brought the bike back with the CB1100 as it sits very close to the same, but the seat itself is bad news......
 

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Like a few said, the older we get the more important it is. I bought my last bike specifically for comfort on longer rides, and had I not wanted more comfort I would not have been buying another bike. So I guess comfort was very important to me.

I chose a Roadking because I always thought they were stylish and good looking bikes, and I like the rock-solid reliability of Harley's.
 

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Like a few said, the older we get the more important it is. I bought my last bike specifically for comfort on longer rides, and had I not wanted more comfort I would not have been buying another bike. So I guess comfort was very important to me.

I chose a Roadking because I always thought they were stylish and good looking bikes, and I like the rock-solid reliability of Harley's.
This is why one manufacture can never be the do all end all for everyone.

Last fall we where looking for a bike, I thought for sure I wanted a RK.
I really love the style and I have had good luck with my 883 over the years.
Right up till I set on one. (We where looking at an 05)
I just didn't like the seating position, it made me feel like I was just too far forward. For lots of folks this is the gold standard, and I don't fault them for their option.

Comfort can be so subjective. You got height/weight different body proportions, then preconceptions of what you like.

Reliability is just a much more quantifiable number.
 

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If you aren't comfortable you won't ride as much or the bike only gets ridden close to home or for short periods of time. Maybe that is why touring bikes are being offered with the options or standard equipment like the old Cadillacs of the sixties that were called boats, you just floated down the highway. Are the sport bikes just made for rides that last as long as an average road race? As to the Victory styling, doesn't one of Arlen Ness's sons work for Victory or consult on designs? Both of my bikes are somewhat comfortable for one tank of gas, so you will be getting off of them every couple of hours or so anyway.
 

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I'm in agreement about the "look" of the Victory, to the extent that I want to see them tone done the space age appearance and give it a more classic cruiser style. The "arrow" aspect of the body, turns me off. I get the aerodynamic logic and that they are intentionally creating what they would call uniqueness, but it (imho) is limiting their Sales.

-Soupy
There is nothing space age looking on my Kingpin. Victory makes more models than the Vision.
 

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This is why one manufacture can never be the do all end all for everyone.

Last fall we where looking for a bike, I thought for sure I wanted a RK.
I really love the style and I have had good luck with my 883 over the years.
Right up till I set on one. (We where looking at an 05)
I just didn't like the seating position, it made me feel like I was just too far forward. For lots of folks this is the gold standard, and I don't fault them for their option.

Comfort can be so subjective. You got height/weight different body proportions, then preconceptions of what you like.

Reliability is just a much more quantifiable number.

It hurt like heck when I sat on the bike the first time due to past injuries, so I knew I'd have to make a few changes. But I also knew what I would have to do, and how easy it would be, and that everything else on the bike would work the way I wanted it to, comfort-wise. (So to speak.)

As you said, comfort is subjective. :)
 

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My one and only experience riding a Victory was a demo ride on the Cross Country Tourer last year. I was very disappointed. The whole bike felt poorly put together. I'm not saying it was, but it just felt "loose". When I ride my Triumph Thunderbird it feels solid, and I like that feeling.

For me, comfort is a requirement and I would not buy a bike that I was not completely comfortable on the moment I get on it. If I have to scrunch my legs back, or lean too far forward, or the seat feels too hard, I move on to another bike. But comfort alone is not enough. I want mechanical reliability and performance that does not leave me dissatisfied. Performance means both handling and power. I don't need nor expect Hayabusa acceleration, but I want to feel that I can comfortably leave the 4 wheelers behind in the dust when the light turns green, and that I can pass a 60 mph truck on a two lane without undue engine effort. I also want one that turns when I lean and does not have to be fought with to go where I want it to go, even a sharp turn from a full stop. After those facts, look and sound come into play. I guess I do expect a lot from a bike before I would consider buying it, but that's just me.
 

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Comfort

I went to the bike show and sat on everything that might interest me, and some that did not.
Huysong 650, SV650 and the Triumph triple cruiser fir the best.
Would not buy an unproven brand from Korea, never again is stuck in my brain about British. I bought an SV650.
I have a soft spot for Moto Guzzi, but the V7 riding position does not suit me, and I do not need or want their big cruiser.
Comfort has always been a factor for me. The bike has to fit my large 5' 6 1/2" frame, with the 28 inch legs. Ducks disease at its finest.

Unkle Crusty*
 
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