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Discussion Starter #1
OK... This is the year... @44 years old I'm going to fulfill the dream and get myself a bike. Grandfather was a motorcycle cop, the dream goes back that far.

@16 years old, mother told me if I bring a motorcycle home, she'll run it over with the truck. I believed her.
@early 20's - I guess I was mature enough to realize that I'd probably kill myself.
@mid-20's - Got married and thought I didn't want to leave my wife a widow.
@late 20's - had the first kid
@32 years old went and took the MFS course and obtained my motorcycle license

Have sat on that for the past 12 years...

@44 - It's going to happen soon.. I've got a 33 mile one way, back road commute that's going to be perfect 6-8 months of the year...

so I joined this forum so I can start my research... right now thinking Honda CB 300F in the fall.

Mike
 

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Hello Mike and welcome to the Forum. Yep, at 44 I'd say you should be mature enough to start riding. I hope you remember all/most of the things that you learned in the BRC. Don't forget to go to a parking lot and practice those slow maneuvers. Good luck to you!
 

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Welcome to the forum. After 12 years away, I think I would take the MSF course again. Unless you have been riding and practicing, chances are you have forgotten much of what you were taught, at least on a visceral level. A nice small bike like a 300cc or so would make a good commuter and a good first bike as long as you don't need to deal with highways. If your commute includes highway miles I would look at something closer to 500cc. Mileage at that point should still be at least 50 MPG and a 500 is even competent on the interstate.
After a few years off, as a long time rider, I went with a 1300cc bike when I started back in. I quickly decided that I needed a refresher so I took the BRC at my first opportunity. Here I am 7 years later and my bike is a 40 MPG 1731cc V-twin. There is no shame in admitting your present skill level and deciding to do something about it. It will give you a good foundation to start from.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Welcome to the forum. After 12 years away, I think I would take the MSF course again. Unless you have been riding and practicing, chances are you have forgotten much of what you were taught, at least on a visceral level. A nice small bike like a 300cc or so would make a good commuter and a good first bike as long as you don't need to deal with highways. If your commute includes highway miles I would look at something closer to 500cc. Mileage at that point should still be at least 50 MPG and a 500 is even competent on the interstate.
After a few years off, as a long time rider, I went with a 1300cc bike when I started back in. I quickly decided that I needed a refresher so I took the BRC at my first opportunity. Here I am 7 years later and my bike is a 40 MPG 1731cc V-twin. There is no shame in admitting your present skill level and deciding to do something about it. It will give you a good foundation to start from.
Thanks for the suggestion re: cc's. I have multiple routes I can take, some all back roads, a little longer but faster highway and back roads combined. Sounds like I'll need to think about a little bigger bike if I'm thinking the highways.

Plan would be to attend the MSF course again as I haven't touched a motorcycle since. I want to build a good riding base with the idea of some day getting a nice tour bike that my wife and I could take on a nice weekend get-a-ways.

I think is the most intimidating point in obtaining my first motorcycle, used or new... showing up with helmet and a safety gear in hand, to drive away on a motorcycle for the first time. That seems both adrenaline filled and nerve racking at the same time.

Thanks again,
m
 

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Hi Mike & welcome to the saddle!

If that last MSF course is your only experience on 2 wheels then yeah you should certainly consider retaking the course. You'll be glad you did.

Re: buying a bike & getting it home.. a "new" purchase can have home delivery arranged into the sale agreement. And for a "used" purchase, if you don't have a buddy who can help ride it home for you, maybe the previous owner might volunteer to do that for you :)
 

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Hi Mike & welcome to the saddle!

If that last MSF course is your only experience on 2 wheels then yeah you should certainly consider retaking the course. You'll be glad you did.

Re: buying a bike & getting it home.. a "new" purchase can have home delivery arranged into the sale agreement. And for a "used" purchase, if you don't have a buddy who can help ride it home for you, maybe the previous owner might volunteer to do that for you :)
Thanks for the getting it home tip, never thought about those options. Guess I could also reach out to a old friend who rides and ask if he'd accompany me to ride it home... Something about removing the 'pressure' of taking off the first time.
 

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Plan would be to attend the MSF course again as I haven't touched a motorcycle since. I want to build a good riding base with the idea of some day getting a nice tour bike that my wife and I could take on a nice weekend get-a-ways.

I think is the most intimidating point in obtaining my first motorcycle, used or new... showing up with helmet and a safety gear in hand, to drive away on a motorcycle for the first time. That seems both adrenaline filled and nerve racking at the same time.
Do show up with gear in hand. Once you have taken and passed the BRC the only way to learn is by doing. Are you going to be in a hurry to get home? I doubt it. Take your time and enjoy that ride home, even if it takes twice as long as it would in your cage. Sooner or later you will be on a real road so why wait and do it from home? If you are really nervous, ride around the dealership parking lot a few times before you go out onto the road. If you can't overcome your trepidation you will never actually be riding and, in my mind, that would be terrible for someone so close to enjoying his ride.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Do show up with gear in hand. Once you have taken and passed the BRC the only way to learn is by doing. Are you going to be in a hurry to get home? I doubt it. Take your time and enjoy that ride home, even if it takes twice as long as it would in your cage. Sooner or later you will be on a real road so why wait and do it from home? If you are really nervous, ride around the dealership parking lot a few times before you go out onto the road. If you can't overcome your trepidation you will never actually be riding and, in my mind, that would be terrible for someone so close to enjoying his ride.
Thanks... I need to just bite the bullet, suit up and go.
 

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Welcome to the forum Mike. I started riding at 44. That was 5 years ago. I'm on my second bike and it's one of the best moves I've made. It's relaxing, profitable (gas) and saves money of the therapy sessions. I have a twenty five mile commute. If it's not raining, I'm riding.
Like the Nike logo says, "Just do it"...
 

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Nice to meet you, MShannon.
You have one year on me, and after not having ridden since high school, I finally decided I needed two wheels.
Started with the BRC, now I'm looking at user friendly 500cc rides. Was going to start with a 250, but thanks to a lot of comments in the forums, I'm getting something a little bigger, with highway power.
Good luck to you, and enjoy the ride!
 
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